Reference : Comprehensive auroral imaging of Saturn during the International Heliophysical Year
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Unpublished conference
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Space science, astronomy & astrophysics
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/19580
Comprehensive auroral imaging of Saturn during the International Heliophysical Year
English
Nichols, J. D. mailto [Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 United States ;]
Clarke, J. T. mailto [Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 United States ;]
Duval, J. mailto [Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 United States ;]
Gérard, Jean-Claude mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'astrophys., géophysique et océanographie (AGO) > Labo de physique atmosphérique et planétaire (LPAP) >]
Grodent, Denis mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'astrophys., géophysique et océanographie (AGO) > Labo de physique atmosphérique et planétaire (LPAP) >]
Wannawichian, S. mailto [Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 United States ;]
1-Dec-2006
No
International
AGU Fall Meeting
American Geophysical Union
San Francisco
[en] 5706 Aurorae ; 5737 Magnetospheres (2756) ; 6275 Saturn
[en] As part of the International Heliophysical Year in 2007, a large-scale campaign is planned to observe the UV auroras of Jupiter and Saturn with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). In this talk we will provide an overview of the Saturn campaign. Previous HST observations of Saturn's auroras have greatly extended our knowledge of the processes that occur in the planet's magnetosphere. In particular, Saturn's main oval auroras vary much more than Jupiter's in terms of latitudinal position and extent, and have been shown to be correlated with the conditions in the solar wind. However, these campaigns have generally been limited by their short-term nature, and in order to establish exactly how the auroras depend on the solar wind we must make observations continually over at least one complete solar rotation. This is the goal of the 2007 campaign, in which Saturn will be observed for a period of 30 days in January and February. The timing is fortuitous since not only will the planet be in opposition, allowing near-Earth measurements of the interplanetary medium to be extrapolated to Saturn's orbit, the Cassini spacecraft will be in a position to obtain in-situ plasma and magnetic field measurements from the magnetosphere and solar wind. Cassini will also make observations of Saturn's UV and SKR emissions throughout the campaign, and the planet will be observed by ground-based IR and radio telescopes. Here we provide a brief review of our current understanding of Saturn's auroras, along with an overview of the coordinated observations planned at Saturn and the key science goals we aim to address.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/19580
http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.P52A..06N

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