Reference : Is the (E)-ß-farnesene only volatile terpenoid in aphids?
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Entomology & pest control
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/18458
Is the (E)-ß-farnesene only volatile terpenoid in aphids?
English
Francis, Frédéric mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech >]
Vandermoten, Sophie mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech >]
Verheggen, François mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech >]
Lognay, Georges mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech >]
Haubruge, Eric mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech > Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech >]
2005
Journal of Applied Entomology
Blackwell Publishing
129
6-11
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0931-2048
[en] aphid ; (E)-beta-farnesene ; infochemicals ; insect–plant interactions ; terpenes
[en] Herbivore insects use a broad range of chemical cues to locate their host to feed or to oviposit. Whether several plant volatiles are effective allelochemicals for insects, the latter also emit molecules which have infochemical role. The (E)-beta-farnesene (EBF) is a well-known aphid alarm pheromone commonly found in all previously tested species. Analysis of the released molecules from 23 aphid species, mainly collected on their natural host plant from May to July, was performed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. While EBF was identified as the main volatile substance in 16 species, alone or associated with other molecules, the alarm pheromone was only a minor component of the volatile molecule pattern of five other species. Moreover, two species, Euceraphis punctipennis and Drepanosiphum platanoides, did not release EBF at all but other terpenes were identified. This original observation raised the question on the utility and the source of the non-EBF volatiles. Are these potential infochemical substances produced by the aphid or only absorbed from the host plant? Here we determined that terpenes released by insects were not only provided by the host plants. Indeed, Megoura viciae emitted additional molecules than the ones from several aphid species reared on the same host plant. Moreover, no systematic relation between the feeding behaviour of the aphid species and the volatile releases was observed. Aphid terpene composition and proportion would provide reliable cues to identify the emitting organism, plant or insect. The next step of this work will be to determine the infochemical role of terpenes found in the range of tested aphid samples to better understand the relations between the different tritrophic levels.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/18458

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