Reference : “How are you Vulnerable?”: Using Participation for Vulnerability Analysis in Emergenc...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Sociology & social sciences
Law, criminology & political science : Political science, public administration & international relations
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/170780
“How are you Vulnerable?”: Using Participation for Vulnerability Analysis in Emergency Planning
English
Rossignol, Nicolas mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de science politique > Anal. et éval. des politiques publ.-Méthod. de sc. politique >]
Turcanu, Catrinel mailto [Studiecentrum voor Energie = Centre d'Etude de l'Energie Nucléaire - SCK = CEN > > > >]
Fallon, Catherine mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de science politique > Département de science politique >]
Zwetkoff, Catherine mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de science politique > Département de science politique >]
2014
Journal of Risk Research
Routledge
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1366-9877
Abingdon
United Kingdom
[en] Vulnerability ; STS ; Emergency Planning ; Participation
[en] Scientists in many fields of research have developed models, theories and concepts attempting to grasp and manage dangers that are often difficult to imagine. Among the different perspectives, the Science and Technology Studies (STS) Vulnerability Approach seems very promising. Relying on a constructivist paradigm, it is based on an inductive collection and analysis of a wide range of factors, with a particular focus on cultural factors and actual day-to-day practices. In this paper, we present the roots of this approach and we display findings based on three case studies exploring emergency planning in three different contexts (a city near a SEVESO plant, a school near a nuclear plant, and a city confronted to multiple catastrophic scenarios). The cases studies were realized by conducting three Focus Groups with different types of stakeholders (citizens, teachers, firemen, decision makers, etc.). After presenting the results of the case studies, we discuss how stakeholders’ participation can inform such type of vulnerability analysis in the context of emergency planning. We argue that participation fosters a deep understanding of actual safety governance practices which allows innovative results to emerge as well as it initiates a learning process among the participants. It contributes to questioning the relations between decision-makers, experts and citizens. It has the potential of bypassing the positivist and quantitative rationale of safety, and thus, of redefining the vulnerability governance. As a conclusion, we question the role of such STS vulnerability approach within the actual vulnerability governance.
Spiral
Belgian Crisis Center ; GDF SUEZ in the framework of the cooperation agreement CO-90–07–2124 between SCK • CEN and GDF SUEZ
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/170780
10.1080/13669877.2014.961522

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