Reference : The rocker bone: a new kind of mineralised tissue?
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Zoology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/14699
The rocker bone: a new kind of mineralised tissue?
English
Parmentier, Eric mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences et gestion de l'environnement > Morphologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Compère, Philippe mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences et gestion de l'environnement > Département des sciences et gestion de l'environnement >]
Casadevall, Margarida [ > > ]
Fontenelle, Nicolas [ > > ]
Cloots, Rudi mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de chimie (sciences) > Chimie inorganique structurale - Doyen de la Faculté des Sciences >]
Henrist, Catherine mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de chimie (sciences) > Chimie inorganique structurale >]
2008
Cell & Tissue Research
Springer Science & Business Media B.V.
334
67-79
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0302-766X
1432-0878
New York
NY
[en] In some Ophidiiform fishes, the anterior part of the swimbladder is thickened into a hard structure called the “rocker bone”, which is thought to play a role in sound production. Although this structure has been described as cartilage or bone, its nature is still unknown. We have made a thorough analysis of the rocker bone in Ophidion barbatum and compared it with both classical bone and cartilage. The rocker bone appears to be a new example of mineralisation. It consists of (1) a ground substance mainly composed of proteoglycans (mucopolysaccharide acid) and fibres and (2) a matrix containing small mineralised spherules composed of a bioapatite and fibrils. These spherules are embedded in mineralised cement of a similar
composition to the spherules themselves. The rocker bone grows via the apposition of new apatite spherules at its periphery. These spherules are first secreted by the innermost fibroblast layer of the capsule contained in the rocker bone and then grow extracellularly. Blood vessels, which represent the only means of transport for matrix and mineral material, are numerous. They enter the rocker bone via the hyle and ramify towards the capsule. We propose to call this new kind of mineralised tissue constituting the rocker bone “frigolite” (the Belgian name for styrofoam) in reference to the presence of spherules of different sizes and
the peculiarity of the rocker bone in presenting a smooth surface when fractured.
Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (Communauté française de Belgique) - F.R.S.-FNRS
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/14699
10.1007/s00441-008-0665-x

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