Reference : A 6-hour nocturnal interruption of a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion: 1. Metabo...
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Endocrinology, metabolism & nutrition
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/14083
A 6-hour nocturnal interruption of a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion: 1. Metabolic and hormonal consequences and scheme for a prompt return to adequate control.
English
Krzentowski, G. [> > > >]
Scheen, André mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Diabétologie, nutrition et maladie métaboliques - Médecine interne générale >]
Castillo, M. [> > > >]
Luyckx, A. S. [> > > >]
Lefebvre, Pierre [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Diabétologie,nutrition, maladies métaboliques >]
1983
Diabetologia
Springer Verlag
24
5
314-8
Yes (verified by ORBi)
0012-186X
Berlin
Germany
[en] 3-Hydroxybutyric Acid ; Adult ; Blood Glucose/metabolism ; Diabetes Mellitus/blood/drug therapy ; Fatty Acids, Nonesterified/blood ; Female ; Glucagon/blood ; Growth Hormone/blood ; Humans ; Hydrocortisone/blood ; Hydroxybutyrates/blood ; Insulin/blood ; Insulin Infusion Systems ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Time Factors
[en] Interruption of a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, most often due to technical problems occurring during the night, is a not uncommon event whose metabolic consequences have received relatively little attention until now. We have therefore investigated the changes in blood glucose, plasma non-esterified fatty acids, 3-hydroxybutyrate, glucagon and free insulin in eight C-peptide negative Type 1 diabetic patients whose pumps were deliberately stopped between 23.00 h and 05.00 h. A control test with the pump functioning normally was carried out in each patient and the studies were randomized. Considering the values at 23.00 h as reference, interruption of the insulin infusion resulted in (1) a rapid decrease in plasma free insulin significant after 1 h and reaching a nadir of 6 +/- 2 mU/l after 6 h; (2) a rise in blood glucose which was significant at hour 3 and reached 17.4 +/- 1.9 mmol/l at hour 6; (3) a moderate increase in plasma nonesterified fatty acids which remained in the range of 700-800 mumol/l; (4) an early and linear rise in plasma 3-hydroxybutyrate, significant after 1 h and averaging 1290 +/- 140 mumol/l after 6 h; (5) a late increase (hour 5) in plasma glucagon. The second aim of our study was to provide for the patient a precise scheme of insulin supplements administered via the pump and based on blood glucose monitoring (Dextrostix - Glucometer) and semi-quantitative evaluation of ketonuria (Acetest). Resetting the pump at its basal rate at 05.00 h and giving insulin supplements (2-8 U) at 06.45 h (with the usual breakfast dose) and again at 10.00 h have proved efficacious in restoring satisfactory metabolic control by noon the day after starting the experiment. These results form practical recommendations to patients undergoing this type of accident.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/14083

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