Reference : Glucose metabolism in obese subjects: lessons from OGTT, IVGTT and clamp studies.
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Endocrinology, metabolism & nutrition
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/13988
Glucose metabolism in obese subjects: lessons from OGTT, IVGTT and clamp studies.
English
Scheen, André mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Diabétologie, nutrition et maladie métaboliques - Médecine interne générale >]
Paquot, Nicolas mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Diabétologie,nutrition, maladies métaboliques >]
Letiexhe, Michel mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Diabétologie,nutrition, maladies métaboliques >]
Paolisso, G. [> > > >]
Castillo, M. J. [> > > >]
Lefebvre, Pierre [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Diabétologie,nutrition, maladies métaboliques >]
1995
International Journal of Obesity & Related Metabolic Disorders
Nature Publishing Group
19 Suppl 3
S14-20
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0307-0565
1476-5497
London
United Kingdom
[en] Blood Glucose/metabolism ; Body Weight/physiology ; Female ; Glucose/metabolism ; Glucose Clamp Technique ; Glucose Tolerance Test ; Humans ; Hyperglycemia/metabolism/physiopathology ; Hyperinsulinism/metabolism/physiopathology ; Insulin Resistance/physiology ; Obesity/blood/metabolism/physiopathology
[en] Impaired glucose tolerance and overt diabetes are more frequent in presence than in absence of obesity. In obese subjects, glucose tolerance can be maintained within the normal range by compensating for insulin resistance by peripheral hyperinsulinism, the latter resulting from both increased insulin secretion and reduced insulin clearance. Impaired glucose tolerance is observed when insulin resistance is associated to impaired first-phase insulin response, which results in a significant increase in plasma glucose levels and a late insulin hyperresponsiveness. Both hyperinsulinaemia and hyperglycaemia are then able to overcome peripheral insulin resistance and impaired glucose disposal. When a more marked defect in insulin secretion is present, hyperglycaemia progresses, probably due to an additional participation of impaired suppression of hepatic glucose output. Overt diabetes then occurs with persistent post-absorptive hyperglycaemia. All these abnormalities can be reversed after a marked weight loss and recovery of ideal body weight, arguing for acquired rather than inherited metabolic defects in presence of morbid obesity. If a sufficient weight reduction can not be obtained, pharmacological approaches may be considered to improve insulin resistance of obese subjects, especially those with impaired glucose tolerance or overt diabetes.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/13988

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