Reference : Cues from introduced fish alter shelter use and feeding behaviour in adult alpine newts
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
Life sciences : Aquatic sciences & oceanology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Animal psychology, ethology & psychobiology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/135870
Cues from introduced fish alter shelter use and feeding behaviour in adult alpine newts
English
Winandy, Laurane mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Biologie du comportement - Ethologie et psychologie animale >]
Denoël, Mathieu mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Biologie du comportement - Ethologie et psychologie animale >]
2013
Ethology
Blackwell Publishing
119
2
121-129
Yes
International
0179-1613
1439-0310
Berlin
Germany
[en] Introduced species ; Fish ; Amphibian ; Behaviour ; Cues ; Shelter use ; Feeding ; Space use ; Risk assessment ; Habituation ; Conservation ; Goldfish ; Alpine newt ; Carassius auratus ; Mesotriton alpestris ; Ichthyosaura alpestris ; Scan ; Focal ; Invasive species ; Effects ; Behavior
[fr] Triton alpestre ; Poisson rouge ; Espèce introduite ; Espèce invasive ; Amphibien
[en] Amphibians are particularly affected by alien fish introductions and are declining worldwide. However, the behavioural mechanisms behind the observed cases of coexistence and exclusion patterns between adult amphibians and fish are poorly understood. In the present study, we aimed at testing the hypothesis that adult newts display different feeding and space use behaviour in the presence of fish cues (i.e. access less food resources and use more shelters than when fish cues are absent). To achieve this we measured behavioural patterns in 100 adult Alpine newts (Mesotriton alpestris) in a replicated laboratory design (20 tanks × 7 replicates across time). Half of trials involved individuals in indirect (visual and olfactory) contact with goldfish (Carassius auratus), a non-predatory species for adult newts. In the presence of fish, significantly more newts hid under shelters than in their absence, but this difference decreased over time. A lower number of newts fed in comparison with controls. These results show that newts responded to fish presence even in the absence of direct contact, but the differences were small. Newts decreased vital activities such as exploration of open areas and feeding. They also adjusted shelter use over time, suggesting a process of habituation or a risk assessment in the absence of direct risk. These results reveal that exploring behavioural patterns can aid in understanding the causes of exclusion and coexistence patterns between fish and amphibians.
AFFISH
NON-FRIA Grant of the University of Liège ; Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (Communauté française de Belgique) - F.R.S.-FNRS ; Fonds Spéciaux de la Recherche (Université de Liège)
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/135870
10.1111/eth.12043
http://reflexions.ulg.ac.be/en/Newts
The final paginated version of this paper is avalable at Wiley website: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com

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