Reference : Is evidence-based medicine so evident in veterinary research and practice? History, o...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Veterinary medicine & animal health
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/103718
Is evidence-based medicine so evident in veterinary research and practice? History, obstacles and perspectives.
English
Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel [Université de Liège - ULg > Département clinique des animaux de production (DCP) > Département clinique des animaux de production (DCP) >]
Kirschvink, Nathalie [Facultés Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix - Namur - FUNDP > Médecine vétérinaire > > >]
Clegg, Peter [University of Liverpool > Faculty of Health and Life Sciences > Department of Musculoskeletal Biology > >]
Vandenput, Sandrina mailto [Université de Liège > > Bibliothèque des Sciences de la vie >]
Gustin, Pascal mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de sciences fonctionnelles > Pharmacologie, pharmacothérapie et toxicologie >]
Saegerman, Claude mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des maladies infectieuses et parasitaires > Epidémiologie et analyse des risques appl. aux sc. vétér. >]
2012
Veterinary Journal
Elsevier
191
1
28-34
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1090-0233
England
[en] Animals ; Evidence-Based Medicine ; Veterinary Medicine
[en] Evidence-based medicine (EBM) refers to the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence from research for the care of an individual patient. The concept of EBM was first described in human medicine in the early 1990s and was introduced to veterinary medicine 10 years later. However, it is not clear that the EBM approach promulgated in human medicine can be applied to the same extent to veterinary medicine. EBM has the potential to help veterinarians to make more informed decisions, but obstacles to the implementation of EBM include a lack of high quality patient-centred research, the need for basic understanding of clinical epidemiology by veterinarians, the absence of adequate searching techniques and accessibility to scientific data bases and the inadequacy of EBM tools that can be applied to the busy daily practise of veterinarians. This review describes the development of EBM in the veterinary profession, identifies its advantages and disadvantages and discusses whether and how veterinary surgeons should further adopt the EBM approach of human medicine.
Students ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/103718
also: http://hdl.handle.net/2268/132494
10.1016/j.tvjl.2011.04.013
Copyright (c) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Restricted access
1-s2.0-S1090023311001511-main.pdfPublisher postprint267.14 kBRequest copy

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.