Reference : Systematic review of efficacy of nutraceuticals to alleviate clinical signs of osteoa...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Veterinary medicine & animal health
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/132492
Systematic review of efficacy of nutraceuticals to alleviate clinical signs of osteoarthritis.
English
Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel [Université de Liège - ULg > Département clinique des animaux de production (DCP) > Département clinique des animaux de production (DCP) >]
Coisnon, C. [> >]
Clegg, P. [> >]
Cambier, Carole mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de sciences fonctionnelles > Département de sciences fonctionnelles >]
Pierson, Audrey mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de sciences fonctionnelles > Pharmacologie, pharmacothérapie et toxicologie >]
Hontoir, F. [> >]
Saegerman, Claude mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des maladies infectieuses et parasitaires > Epidémiologie et analyse des risques appl. aux sc. vétér. >]
Gustin, Pascal mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de sciences fonctionnelles > Pharmacologie, pharmacothérapie et toxicologie >]
Buczinski, S. [> >]
2012
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
26
3
448-56
Yes (verified by ORBi)
0891-6640
United States
[en] Animals ; Cat Diseases/diet therapy ; Cats ; Clinical Trials as Topic ; Dietary Supplements ; Dog Diseases/diet therapy ; Dogs ; Evidence-Based Medicine/methods ; Horse Diseases/diet therapy ; Horses ; Osteoarthritis/diet therapy/veterinary
[en] BACKGROUND: Various treatments of osteoarthritis (OA) have been described, including use of nutraceuticals. OBJECTIVES: To review systematically the literature about the effects of nutraceuticals on clinical signs of pain or abnormal locomotion in horses, dogs, and cats, and to discuss methodological aspects of trials and systematic reviews. METHODS: A systematic search of controlled trials evaluating the impact of nutraceuticals on OA in horses, dogs, and cats was performed, using Medline, CAB Abstracts, and Google Scholar. Scientific evidence was evaluated by means of criteria proposed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and a scoring system adapted from both the CONsolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement and recommendations for assessing trials by the Center of Evidence Based Medicine of Oxford. RESULTS: Twenty-two papers were selected and reviewed, with 5 studies performed in horses, 16 in dogs, and 1 in cats. The strength of evidence was low for all nutraceuticals except for omega-3 fatty acid in dogs. There were limited numbers of rigorous randomized controlled trials and of participants in clinical trials. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: The evidence of efficacy of nutraceuticals is poor, with the exception of diets supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids in dogs. Greater access to systematic reviews must be part of the objectives of the veterinary science in the future. Their reporting would be improved by internationally agreed-upon criteria for standards and guidelines.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/132492
10.1111/j.1939-1676.2012.00901.x
Copyright (c) 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

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