Reference : Chemical composition of silage residues sustaining the larval development of the Culi...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Entomology & pest control
Life sciences : Veterinary medicine & animal health
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/132486
Chemical composition of silage residues sustaining the larval development of the Culicoides obsoletus/Culicoides scoticus species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)
English
Zimmer, Jean-Yves mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences agronomiques > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Saegerman, Claude mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des maladies infectieuses et parasitaires > Epidémiologie et analyse des risques appl. aux sc. vétér. >]
Losson, Bertrand mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des maladies infectieuses et parasitaires > Parasitologie et pathologie des maladies parasitaires >]
Beckers, Yves mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences agronomiques > Zootechnie >]
Haubruge, Eric mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Services administratifs généraux > Vice-Recteur de Gembloux Agro Bio Tech >]
Francis, Frédéric mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences agronomiques > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
2013
Veterinary Parasitology
191
1-2
197-201
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0304-4017
[en] Culicoides ; Silage residues ; Breeding sites ; Obsoletus complex ; Bluetongue
[en] Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV). Bluetongue is a viral disease that affects domestic and wild ruminants. Since its recent emergence in northern Europe, this disease has caused considerable economic losses to the sheep and cattle industry. The biotopes, and more particularly the chemical characteristics which are suitable for larval development of the main vector species, are still relatively unknown. This study shows that the larvae of biting midges belonging to the species Culicoides obsoletus and Culicoides scoticus are able to breed in different types of silage residue (maize, grass, sugar beet pulp and their combinations). The chemical composition of substrates strongly influences the presence of the immature stages of these biting midges. Higher lignin and insoluble fibre contents seem to favour their presence and could play the role of a physical support for semi-aquatic larvae. In contrast, higher concentrations of magnesium and calcium are negatively correlated with the presence of these two species. These data will help to locate and monitor the breeding sites of these species and could contribute to the control of these insects on farms.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/132486
Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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