Reference : Perilimbal pocket technique for surgical repositioning of prolapsed nictitans gland in d...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Veterinary medicine & animal health
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/132432
Perilimbal pocket technique for surgical repositioning of prolapsed nictitans gland in dogs
English
Prémont, Johanna mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département clinique des animaux de compagnie et des équidés > Médecine des oiseaux, des lagomorphes et des rongeurs >]
Monclin, Sébastien mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département clinique des animaux de compagnie et des équidés > Pathologie médicale des petits animaux >]
Farnir, Frédéric mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de productions animales > Biostatistiques et bioinformatique appliquées aux sc. vétér. >]
Grauwels, Magda mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département clinique des animaux de compagnie et des équidés > Département clinique des animaux de compagnie et des équidés >]
8-Sep-2012
Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association
British Veterinary Medicine
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0042-4900
London
United Kingdom
[en] The objective of this prospective study was to investigate the success rate, practicality and complications of a new perilimbal pocket technique for the replacement of prolapsed nictitans gland in 30 dogs (44 eyes). A first incision was made in the bulbar conjunctiva, 2-3 mm from and parallel to the infero-nasal limbus, a second incision on the bulbar aspect of the nictitating membrane (NM), 2-3 mm parallel to the free edge. The gland was returned to its normal position by suturing the subconjunctival tissues of the NM to the episcleral tissues, using four to six interrupted horizontal mattress sutures. The English bulldog, Neapolitan mastiff, great dane and American cocker spaniel were commonly presented. Nictitans gland prolapse occurred prior to one year of age in 83.3 per cent of dogs, and unilaterally in 15 patients. The procedure was easy to perform, and had a 90.9 per cent success rate, with minimal complications. The median duration of follow-up, conducted by ophthalmic examination or telephone contact with the owners, was 21.5 months. Tear production and ocular health were not affected in 17 eyes with at least six months follow-up. There was a statistically significant increase between preoperative and postoperative Schirmer tear test-1 measurements.
Professionals ; Students ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/132432

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