Reference : The spatial footprint of the non-ferrous metal industry in Lubumbashi
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Social, industrial & organizational psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/131809
The spatial footprint of the non-ferrous metal industry in Lubumbashi
English
Vranken, Isabelle mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Biodiversité et Paysage >]
Munyemba Kankumbi, François [> >]
Amisi Mwana, Yamba [> >]
Bamba, Issouf [> >]
Veroustraete, Frank [> >]
Visser, Marjolein mailto [> >]
Bogaert, Jan mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Biodiversité et Paysage >]
2013
Tropicultura
Agri-Overseas
31
1
Landscape ecology in Subsaharian Africa
20-27
Yes
International
0771-3312
Bruxelles
Belgium
[en] Copper belt ; Lubumbashi ; Atmospheric deposits ; Landscape metrics ; Perception ; Kevin Lynch
[en] In the south-eastern part of the Katanga Province (Democratic Republic of the Congo), high concentrations of copper and cobalt are found in the soils of the well-known “Copper Belt”. Due to the dominant south-eastern winds, the metallurgic industry in Lubumbashi has been the source of spatially concentrated atmospheric deposits of non-ferrous metal particles and associated substances in a cone-shaped zone, situated north-west of the metal processing site. The existence of this zone has been evidenced using two different techniques: firstly, by means of landscape metric comparisons of the vegetation and bare soil patterns in two study areas, one inside the pollution cone and one outside; secondly, by means of the theory on city perception developed by Kevin Lynch. Higher fragmentation and lower vegetation presence were observed inside the pollution cone, reflecting the negative impact of atmospheric deposits. Those differences were higher for sites closer to the emission source. Lynch’s approach outlined the negative impact of diverse industrial plants on the perception by the local population. Six pollution districts and several contaminated paths, limits, nodes and polluting landmarks were identified. Citizens even recognize them as part of the collective image of the city.
Université Libre de Bruxelles, Service d'Ecologie du Paysage et Systèmes de Production Végétale ; Gembloux Agro Bio Tech, unité Biodiversité et Paysage
Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (Communauté française de Belgique) - F.R.S.-FNRS ; Commission universitaire pour le Développement - CUD
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/131809

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