Reference : Using the daydreaming frequency scale to investigate the relationships between mind-wand...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/131563
Using the daydreaming frequency scale to investigate the relationships between mind-wandering, psychological well-being, and present-moment awareness
English
Stawarczyk, David mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
Majerus, Steve mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
Van der Linden, Martial mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
D'Argembeau, Arnaud mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
2012
Frontiers in Psychology [=FPSYG]
Switzerland Frontiers Research Foundation
3
363
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1664-1078
Pully
Switzerland
[en] mind-wandering ; daydreaming ; mindful awareness ; encoding style ; psychological distress ; well-being
[en] Recent findings have shown that mind-wandering – the occurrence of stimulusindependent
and task-unrelated thoughts – is associated with negative affect and lower
psychological well-being. However, it remains unclear whether this relationship is due to
the occurrence of mind-wandering per se or to the fact that people who mind wander
more tend to be generally less attentive to present-moment experience. In three studies,
we first validate a French translation of a retrospective self-report questionnaire widely
used to assess the general occurrence of mind-wandering in daily life – the Daydreaming
Frequency Scale. Using this questionnaire, we then show that the relationship between
mind-wandering frequency and psychological distress is fully accounted for by individual
differences in dispositional mindful awareness and encoding style.These findings suggest
that it may not be mind-wandering per se that is responsible for psychological distress,
but rather the general tendency to be less aware and attentive to the present-moment.
Thus, although mind-wandering and present-moment awareness are related constructs,
they are not reducible to one another, and are distinguishable in terms of their relationship
with psychological well-being.
Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (Communauté française de Belgique) - F.R.S.-FNRS
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/131563
http://www.frontiersin.org/personality_science_and_individual_differences/10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00363/abstract

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Open access
Stawarczyk et al. - 2012 - Frontiers.pdfPublisher postprint875.43 kBView/Open

Additional material(s):

File Commentary Size Access
Open access
DDFS_French.pdfFrench Daydreaming Frequency Scale336.15 kBView/Open
Open access
FST_French.pdfFrench Future Self Thoughts questionnaire45.94 kBView/Open

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.