Reference : Understanding veterinary practitioners' decision-making process: implications for vet...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Veterinary medicine & animal health
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/131454
Understanding veterinary practitioners' decision-making process: implications for veterinary medical education
English
Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel [Université de Liège - ULg > Département clinique des animaux de production (DCP) > Département clinique des animaux de production (DCP) >]
Vandeweerd, Solene [> >]
Gustin, Catherine [> >]
Keesemaecker, Geneviève mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de sciences fonctionnelles > Département de sciences fonctionnelles >]
Cambier, Carole mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de sciences fonctionnelles > Département de sciences fonctionnelles >]
Clegg, Peter [> >]
Saegerman, Claude mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des maladies infectieuses et parasitaires > Epidémiologie et analyse des risques appl. aux sc. vétér. >]
Reda, Ayalu [> >]
Perrenoud, Philippe [> >]
Gustin, Pascal mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de sciences fonctionnelles > Pharmacologie, pharmacothérapie et toxicologie >]
2012
Journal of Veterinary Medical Education
University of Toronto Press
39
2
142-151
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0748-321X
Toronto
Canada
[en] evidence-based medicine ; decision ; veterinarian
[en] Understanding how veterinary practitioners make clinical decisions, and how they use scientific information to inform their decisions, is important to optimize animal care, client satisfaction, and veterinary education. We aimed to develop an understanding of private practitioners' process of decision making. On the basis of a grounded-theory qualitative approach, we conducted a telephone survey and semi-structured face-to-face interviews. We identified a decision-making framework consisting of two possible processes to make decisions, five steps in the management of a clinical case, and three influencing factors. To inform their decision, veterinary surgeons rarely take the evidence-based medicine (EBM) approach. They consult first-opinion colleagues, specialists, laboratories, and the Internet rather than scientific databases and peer-reviewed literature, mainly because of limited time. Most interviewees suggested the development of educational interventions to better develop decision-making skills in veterinary schools. Adequate information and EBM tools are needed to optimize the time spent in query and assessment of scientific information, and practitioners need to be trained in their use.
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/131454

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