Reference : AOB community structure and richness under European beech, sessile oak, Norway spruce...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/130266
AOB community structure and richness under European beech, sessile oak, Norway spruce and Douglas-fir at three temperate forest sites
English
Malchair, Sandrine mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Ecologie végétale et microbienne >]
Carnol, Monique mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Ecologie végétale et microbienne >]
May-2013
Plant and Soil
366
1-2
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0032-079X
1573-5036
[en] Forest soil ; Tree species ; ammonia oxidizing bacteria ; PCR-DGGE ; soil chemical properties ; microbial activities
[en] Abstract

Background and aims The relations between tree species, microbial diversity and activity can alter ecosystem functioning. We investigated ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community structure and richness, microbial/environmental factors related to AOB diversity and the relationship between AOB diversity and the nitrification process under several tree species.
Methods Forest floor (Of, Oh) was sampled under European beech, sessile oak, Norway spruce and Douglas-fir at three sites. AOB community structure was assessed by PCR-DGGE and sequencing. Samples were analyzed for net N mineralization, potential nitrification, basal respiration, microbial biomass, microbial or metabolic quotient, pH, total nitrogen, extractable ammonium, organic matter content and exchangeable cations.
Results AOB community structure and tree species effect on AOB diversity were site-specific. AOB richness was not related to nitrification. Factors regulating ammonium availability, i.e. net N mineralization or microbial biomass, were related to AOB community structure.
Conclusion Our research shows that, at larger spatial scales, site specific characteristics may be more important than the nature of tree species in determining AOB diversity (richness and community structure). Within sites, tree species influence AOB diversity. The absence of a relation between AOB richness and nitrification points to a possibly role of AOB abundance, phenotypic plasticity or the implication of ammonia oxidizing archaea.
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/130266
10.1007/s11104-012-1450-x

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