Reference : Spinal muscle evaluation using the Sorensen test: a critical appraisal of the literature
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Orthopedics, rehabilitation & sports medicine
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/12988
Spinal muscle evaluation using the Sorensen test: a critical appraisal of the literature
English
Demoulin, Christophe mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la motricité > Kinésithérapie spécifique et réadaptation motrice >]
Vanderthommen, Marc mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la motricité > Kinésithérapie spécifique et réadaptation motrice >]
Duysens, Christophe [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Chirurgie de l'appareil locomoteur >]
Crielaard, Jean-Michel mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la motricité > Evaluation et entraînement des aptitudes physiques - Médecine physique et réadaptation fonctionnelle >]
2006
Joint Bone Spine
Elsevier Science
73
43-50
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1297-319X
1778-7254
Paris
France
[en] muscle endurance ; low back pain ; trunk extensor muscles ; physical evaluation ; spinal muscles
[en] The first test for evaluating the isometric endurance of trunk extensor muscles was described by Hansen in 1964. In 1984, following a study by Biering-Sorensen, this test became known as the “Sorensen test” and gained considerable popularity as a tool reported to predict low back
pain within the next year in males. The test consists in measuring the amount of time a person can hold the unsupported upper body in a horizontal prone position with the lower body fixed to the examining table. This test has been used in many studies, either in its original version or as variants. Although its discriminative validity, reproducibility, and safety seem good, debate continues to surround its ability to predict low back pain; in addition, the gender-related difference in position-holding time remains unexplained and the influence of body weight unclear. A contribution of the hip extensor muscles to position holding has been established, but its magnitude remains unknown. The influence of personal factors such as motivation complicates the interpretation of the results. Despite these drawbacks, the Sorensen test has become the tool of reference for evaluating muscle performance in patients with low back pain, most notably before and after rehabilitation programs.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/12988

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