Reference : Working fluid selection and operating maps for Organic Rankine Cycle expansion machines
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Paper published in a book
Engineering, computing & technology : Energy
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/128663
Working fluid selection and operating maps for Organic Rankine Cycle expansion machines
English
Quoilin, Sylvain mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'aérospatiale et mécanique > Systèmes énergétiques >]
Declaye, Sébastien mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'aérospatiale et mécanique > Systèmes énergétiques >]
Legros, Arnaud mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'aérospatiale et mécanique > Systèmes énergétiques >]
Guillaume, Ludovic mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'aérospatiale et mécanique > Systèmes énergétiques >]
Lemort, Vincent mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département d'aérospatiale et mécanique > Systèmes énergétiques >]
2012
Proceedings of the 21st International Compressor Conference at Purdue
10
Yes
No
International
21st International Compressor Conference at Purdue
from 16-07-2012 to 19-07-2012
[en] ORC ; Organic Rankine Cycle ; expander ; screw ; scroll ; turbine ; operating map ; fluid selection
[en] Fluid selection for the Organic Rankine Cycle has been the object of an abundant literature. Most of the scientific publications focus on the cycle thermodynamic efficiency in order to select the best candidate. However, other thermodynamics properties, such as molar mass, or vapor density condition the whole design of the cycle, and its cost. For example, the molar mass influences the number of stages required in the case of an axial turbine; the volume ratio between expander supply and exhaust conditions the possibility to use a volumetric expander (whose internal volume ratio is limited); the vapor density at the expander exhaust determine the size of the expander, and of the condenser; etc.
This paper considers a whole range of ORC applications, in terms of power (from the kW-scale to the multi-MW plants), heat source temperature (from 90°C to more than 300°C) or heat source nature (solar, biomass, waste heat recovery, geothermy, etc.). For each of these applications, a screening of the available fluids is performed, and their thermodynamics performance are compared with respect to the foreseen application.
A detailed analysis of the most common expansion machines is then conducted, by comparing their respective operating maps for each fluid and for each application type. The considered expansion machines are the radial-inflow turbine, the screw expander, and the scroll expander, since they are the most widely used in commercial applications and/or in scientific literature.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/128663

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