Reference : Parental educational level influence on memory and executive performance in children
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/127184
Parental educational level influence on memory and executive performance in children
English
[en] Influence du niveau éducationnel des parents sur des mesures exécutives et de mémoire chez des enfants
Catale, Corinne mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement >]
Willems, Sylvie mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Services généraux (Fac. de psycho. et des sc. de l'éducat.) > Clinique psychologique et logopédique universitaire (CPLU) >]
Lejeune, Caroline mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Neuropsychologie >]
Meulemans, Thierry mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Services généraux (Fac. de psycho. et des sc. de l'éducat.) > Doyen de la Faculté de Psychologie et des sc. de l'éducation >]
2012
European Review of Applied Psychology = Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée
Elsevier
62
161-171
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1162-9088
Paris
France
[en] Parental level influence ; Cognitive performance ; Children
[en] Introduction. – The influence of Parental Educational Status (PES) on cognitive performance has been confirmed in several studies.
Objective. – The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between PES and several domains of cognitive functioning and examine, through mediation analyses, the relationship between PES, language,and cognitive tasks. Method. – We first administered tasks measuring memory, executive and attentional abilities to 64 European native French speakers, divided into two groups of children according to parents’ educational status.
Results. – The results suggest that, on most tasks, the effect of socio-educational status is mediated by language abilities. However, because the results were less clear for executive functions, we carried out a second experiment in which we administered more specific executive measures (i.e. inhibition, cognitive flexibility, updating and reasoning) to 80 children.
Conclusion. – The results confirmed the influence of the parents’ educational status on the executive functioning and also that, contrary to other cognitive functions, this influence on executive tasks is not completely explained by language differences.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/127184

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