Reference : Characterization of the primary sonic muscles in Carapus acus (Carapidae): a multidiscip...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Zoology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/12702
Characterization of the primary sonic muscles in Carapus acus (Carapidae): a multidisciplinary approach
English
Parmentier, Eric mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences et gestion de l'environnement > Morphologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Gennotte, Vincent mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de formation et de recherche en aquaculture (CEFRA) >]
Focant, Bruno [Université de Liège - ULg > > > > > >]
Goffinet, Gerhard mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Services généraux (Faculté des sciences) > Relations académiques et scientifiques (Sciences) >]
Vandewalle, Pierre mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences et gestion de l'environnement > Morphologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
7-Nov-2003
Proceedings of the Royal Society B : Biological Sciences
Royal Soc London
270
1530
2301-2308
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0962-8452
London
[en] sonic muscle ; Carapidae ; helix ; parvalbumin ; myofibrils ; ATPase activity
[en] Sound production in carapid fishes results from the action of extrinsic muscles that insert into the swim bladder. Biochemical, histochemical and morphological techniques were used to examine the sonic muscles and compare them with epaxial muscles in Carapus acus. Sonic fibres are thicker than red and thinner than white epaxial fibres, and sonic fibres and myofibrils exhibit an unusual helicoidal organization: the myofibrils of the centre are in a straight line whereas they are more and more twisted towards the periphery. Sonic muscles have both features of red (numerous mitochondria, high glycogen content) and white (alkali-stable ATPase) fibres. They differ also in the isoforms of the light chain (LC3) and heavy chain (HC), in having T tubules at both the Z-line and the A–I junction and in a unique parvalbumin
isoform (PAI) that may aid relaxation. All these features lead to the expression of two assumptions about sound generation: the sonic muscle should be able to perform fast and powerful contractions that provoke the forward movement of the forepart of the swim bladder and the stretching and ‘flapping’ of the swim bladder fenestra; the helicoidal organization allows progressive drawing of the swim bladder fenestra which emits a sound when rapidly released in a spring-like manner.
Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (Communauté française de Belgique) - F.R.S.-FNRS
Researchers ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/12702
10.1098/rspb.2003.2495

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