Reference : The impact of aging and hearing status on verbal short-term memory
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Unpublished conference
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/126902
The impact of aging and hearing status on verbal short-term memory
English
[fr] Les impacts de l'âge et du statut auditif sur la mémoire à court terme verbale
Verhaegen, Clémence mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Neuropsychologie du langage et des apprentissages >]
Collette, Fabienne mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Neuropsychologie >]
Majerus, Steve mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
May-2012
Yes
No
International
First joint meeting of the Belgian Association for Psychological Sciences and the Sociedad Española de Psicología Experimental
10-11 may 2012
University of Liège
Liège
Belgium
[en] aging ; hearing loss ; verbal short-term memory
[en] We determined the impact of hearing status on age-related effects on verbal short-term memory (STM). Rabbit (1991) observed that elderly participants with hearing loss show impaired STM; he suggested that in the case of hearing loss, attentional resources had to be recruited to a larger extent to stimulus perception, reducing the available pool of attentional resources for STM processing. We tested this hypothesis by distinguishing the impact of aging from the impact of hearing status on STM. This was done by administering different verbal STM tasks to elderly and young adult participants matched for hearing threshold, as well as normal-hearing control participants. We observed that elderly participants and hearing-matched young participants showed equal levels of performance in all verbal STM tasks, and performed overall more poorly than the normal-hearing young control participants. These results suggest that mild hearing impairment is a major explanatory factor of reduced STM performance, and importantly, is age-independent. The results are discussed within an interactive framework of STM and attentional processing (Majerus et al., 2009).
University of Liège (Bourse non fria) ; Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (Communauté française de Belgique) - F.R.S.-FNRS
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/126902

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