Reference : A comparison of the training value of two types of anesthesia simulators: Computer sc...
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Anesthesia & intensive care
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/12487
A comparison of the training value of two types of anesthesia simulators: Computer screen-based and mannequin-based simulators
English
Nyssen, Anne-Sophie mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de personne et société > Ergonomie et intervention au travail >]
Larbuisson, Robert mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Anesthésie et réanimation >]
Janssens, Marc mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Anesthésie et réanimation >]
Pendeville, P. [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc (Bruxelles) > > department of anesthesiology> > > >]
Mayne, A. [Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc (Bruxelles) > > >department of anesthesiology > > >]
Jun-2002
Anesthesia and Analgesia
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
94
6
1560-1565
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0003-2999
1526-7598
Philadelphia
[en] simulation ; training ; anesthesiology
[en] In this study, we compared two different training simulators (the computer screen-based simulator versus the full-scale simulator) with respect to training effectiveness in anesthesia residents. Participants were evaluated in the management of a simulated preprogrammed scenario of anaphylactic shock using two variables: treatment score and diagnosis time. Our results showed that simulators can contribute significantly to the improvement of performance but that learning in treating simulated crisis situations such as anaphylactic shock did not significantly vary between full-scale and computer screen-based simulators. Consequently, the initial decision on whether to use a full-scale or computer screen-based training simulator should be made on the basis of cost and learning objectives rather than on the basis of technical or fidelity criteria. Our results support the contention that screen-based simulators are good devices to acquire technical skills of crisis management. Mannequin-based simulators would probably provide better training for behavioral aspects of crisis management, such as communication, leadership, and interpersonal conflicts, but this was not tested in the current study. IMPLICATIONS: We compared two different training simulators (computer screen-based versus full-scale) for training anesthesia residents to better document the effectiveness of such devices as training tools. This is an important issue, given the extensive use and the high cost of mannequin-based simulators in anesthesiology.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/12487

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