Reference : The community of Hymenoptera parasitizing necrophagous Diptera in an urban biotope
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Entomology & pest control
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/123504
The community of Hymenoptera parasitizing necrophagous Diptera in an urban biotope
English
Frederickx, Christine [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences agronomiques > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Dekeirsschieter, Jessica mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences agronomiques > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Verheggen, François mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences agronomiques > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Haubruge, Eric mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Services administratifs généraux > Vice-Recteur de Gembloux Agro Bio Tech >]
Apr-2013
Journal of Insect Science [=JIS]
University of Wisconsin Library
13
32
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1536-2442
WI
[en] Alysia manducator ; Nasonia vitripennis, ; Tachinaephagus zealandicus ; carrion ecology ; forensic entomology ; temperate area
[en] Most reports published in the field of forensic entomology are focused on Diptera and neglect the Hymenoptera community. However, Hymenoptera are part of the entomofaunal colonisation of a dead body. The use of Hymenoptera parasitoids in forensic entomology can be relevant to evaluate the time of death. Hymenoptera parasitoids of the larvae and pupae of flies may play an important role in the estimation of the post-mortem period, because their time of attack is often restricted to a small, well-defined windows of time in the development of the host insect. However, these parasitoids can interfere with the developmental times of colonising Diptera, and therefore a better understanding of their ecology is needed. The work reported here monitored the presence of adult Hymenoptera parasitoids on decaying pig carcasses in an urban biotope during the summer season (from May to September). Six families and six species were recorded in the field: Aspilota fuscicornis Haliday, Alysia manducator Panzer, Nasonia vitripennis Walker, Tachinaephagus zealandicus Ashmead, Trichopria sp., and Figites sp. In the laboratory, five species emerged from pupae collected in the field: Trichopria sp., Figites sp., A. manducator, N. vitripennis, and T. zealandicus. These five species colonise a broad spectrum of Diptera hosts, including those species associated with decomposing carcasses: Calliphoridae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, and Sarcophagidae
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/123504

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Open access
version finale.pdfPublisher postprint2.41 MBView/Open

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.