Reference : Could current Pericopsis elata (Fabaceae) patches in southeastern Cameroon be reasonably...
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Poster
Life sciences : Phytobiology (plant sciences, forestry, mycology...)
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/123395
Could current Pericopsis elata (Fabaceae) patches in southeastern Cameroon be reasonably linked to past anthropogenic activities ?
English
Bourland, Nils mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Gestion des ressources forestières et des milieux naturels >]
Cerisier, François mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Gestion des ressources forestières et des milieux naturels >]
Livingstone Smith, Alexandre [ > > ]
Hubau, Wannes [ > > ]
Beeckman, Hans [ > > ]
Brostaux, Yves mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences agronomiques > Statistique, Inform. et Mathém. appliquée à la bioingénierie >]
Fétéké, Fousseni Richard [ > > ]
Lejeune, Philippe mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Gestion des ressources forestières et des milieux naturels >]
Ntoudé Tiba, Eric [ > > ]
Doucet, Jean-Louis mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Laboratoire de Foresterie des régions trop. et subtropicales >]
1-Mar-2012
A0
No
International
The impact of a major environmental crisis on species, populations and communities : the fragmentation of African forests at the end of the Holocene
du 1er au 2 mars 2012
Académie des Sciences de l'Institut de France, Agence Nationale de la Recherche
Paris
France
[en] Pericopsis elata ; Southeastern Cameroon ; Anthropogenic activities ; Ecology ; Charcoal ; Pottery
[en] Pericopsis elata is one of the most valuable African timber species. This IUCN Red Listed tree suffers from a lack of regeneration, thus its current presence provokes questioning. Our work aimed at understanding its origins so as to help securing its future. This study, lead away from engineering works, was conducted in four different sites located within the natural distribution area of the species and took into account the different growing conditions were the species occurs. Our observations were based on an analysis of charcoal elements and pottery fragments discovered in subsurface layers of soils as well as on current botanical and pedological surveys. Discovered evidence of past human activities led to the assumption that this part of the Congo Basin was much more inhabited than previously thought. Some of the results obtained for P. elata could apply for other long lived light demanding species growing in the same environment.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/123395

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