Reference : Relationship between video game practice and attentional performance in children
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Paper published in a book
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/123291
Relationship between video game practice and attentional performance in children
English
Catale, Corinne mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement >]
Lejeune, Caroline mailto [ > > ]
Meulemans, Thierry mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Services généraux (Fac. de psycho. et des sc. de l'éducat.) > Doyen de la Faculté de Psychologie et des sc. de l'éducation >]
2012
1st Joint Meeting of the Belgian Association for Psychological Science and Sociedad Espanola de Psicologia Experimental. Book of abstracts
115-116
Yes
International
BAPS-SEPEX Meeting
10-11 mai 2012
[en] Children ; Attention ; Video game
[en] Recent studies in adults have shown an advantage for video games players compared to non-video game players on several attentional tasks, and particularly those involving visual processing and spatial distribution of attention. However, little is known about the influence of video game practice on children’s attentional and executive abilities. In this study, eighty 8-10 years old children divided into three groups (non-video-game players [NVGP], moderate video game players [MVGP], and Intense video game player [IVGP]) were administered computerized attentional/executive tasks tapping vigilance, visual and auditory selective attention, inhibition, and cognitive flexibility. Parents were also asked to complete behavioral scales. Results indicate limited effects of video game practice on attentional/executive tasks, with an advantage in reaction time only for vigilance and flexibility tasks. On the other hand, results on behavioral measures showed a positive relationship between the importance of video-game practice and hyperactive behaviors. In conclusion, these results support the idea that video game practice has a limited influence on attentional performance in children, while they might have an effect on the behavioral area.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/123291

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