Reference : Brain edema and intracranial hypertension in fulminant hepatic failure: Pathophysiolo...
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Neurology
Human health sciences : Anesthesia & intensive care
Human health sciences : Surgery
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/1214
Brain edema and intracranial hypertension in fulminant hepatic failure: Pathophysiology and management
English
Detry, Olivier mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Chirurgie abdominale- endocrinienne et de transplantation >]
De Roover, Arnaud mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Chirurgie abdominale- endocrinienne et de transplantation >]
Honore, Pierre mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Chirurgie abdominale- endocrinienne et de transplantation >]
Meurisse, Michel mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Chirurgicale abdominale ]
14-Dec-2006
World Journal of Gastroenterology
W J G Press
12
46
7405-7412
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1007-9327
Beijing
[en] intracranial hypertension ; fulminant hepatic failure ; brain edema
[en] Intracranial hypertension is a major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients suffering from fulminant hepatic failure. The etiology of this intracranial hypertension is not fully determined, and is probably multifactorial, combining a cytotoxic brain edema due to the astrocytic accumulation of glutamine, and an increase in cerebral blood volume and cerebral blood flow, in part due to inflammation, to glutamine and to toxic products of the diseased liver. Validated methods to control intracranial hypertension in fulminant hepatic failure patients mainly include mannitol, hypertonic saline, indomethacin, thiopental, and hyperventilation. However all these measures are often not sufficient in absence of liver transplantation, the only curative treatment of intracranial hypertension in fulminant hepatic failure to date. Induced moderate hypothermia seems very promising in this setting, but has to be validated by a controlled, randomized study. Artificial liver support systems have been under investigation for many decades. The bioartificial liver, based on both detoxification and swine liver cells, has shown some efficacy on reduction of intracranial pressure but did not show survival benefit in a controlled, randomized study. The Molecular Adsorbents Recirculating System has shown some efficacy in decreasing intracranial pressure in an animal model of liver failure, but has still to be evaluated in a phase Ill trial. (c) 2006 The WJG Press. All rights reserved.
Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/1214

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