Reference : Electrophysiological and behavioural responses of Thanatophilus sinuatus F. (Coleopte...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Entomology & pest control
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/119824
Electrophysiological and behavioural responses of Thanatophilus sinuatus F. (Coleoptera: Silphidae) to selected cadaveric volatile organic compounds
English
Dekeirsschieter, Jessica mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences agronomiques > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Frederickx, Christine [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences agronomiques > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Lognay, Georges mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Chimie et bio-industries > Analyse, qual. et risques - Labo. de Chimie analytique >]
Brostaux, Yves mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences agronomiques > Statistique, Inform. et Mathém. appliquée à la bioingénierie >]
Verheggen, François mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences agronomiques > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Haubruge, Eric mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Services administratifs généraux > Vice-Recteur de Gembloux Agro Bio Tech >]
Jun-2013
Journal of Forensic Sciences
ASTM International
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0022-1198
1556-4029
Philadelphia
PA
[en] Forensic science ; Forensic entomology ; chemical ecology ; carrion beetles ; Silphinae ; carrion ecology ; cadaveric VOCs ; insect olfaction ; electroantennography ; olfactometry
[en] Soon after death, carcasses release volatile chemicals that attract carrion insects including Silphidae. Nevertheless, it is not known which chemical cues are involved in the attractiveness of the carcass. So far, little information is available on the chemical ecology of carrion beetles, particularly concerning the subfamily of Silphinae. The biological role of selected cadaveric volatile organic compounds including: dimethyldisulfide (DMDS), butan-1-ol, n-butanoic acid, indole, phenol, p-cresol, putrescine, and cadaverine on the silphine species, Thanatophilus sinuatus Fabricius, was investigated by using both electrophysiological and behavioural techniques. Among the tested cadaveric compounds, butan-1-ol and DMDS elicited the strongest EAG from both T. sinuatus male and female antennae. In a two-arm olfactometer, males and females were significantly attracted to dimethyldisulfide (DMDS) for both tested doses, whereas only males were attracted to p-cresol at 100 ng. Putrescine was repellent to males at the dose of 1 µg
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/119824

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