Reference : The mere exposure effect without recognition can depend on the way you look!
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/11893
The mere exposure effect without recognition can depend on the way you look!
English
Willems, Sylvie mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
dedonder, jonathan [ > > ]
Van der Linden, Martial mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
2010
Experimental Psychology
57
3
185-192
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1618-3169
[en] Implicit/explicit ; recognition ; mere exposure effect
[en] In line with [Whittlesea, B. W. A., & Price, J. R. (2001). Implicit/Explicit memory versus analytic/nonanalytic processing: Rethinking the mere exposure effect. Memory and Cognition, 26, 547-565], we investigated whether the memory effect measured with an implicit memory paradigm (mere exposure effect) and an explicit recognition task depended on perceptual processing strategies, regardless of whether the task required intentional retrieval. We found that manipulation intended to prompt functional implicit-explicit dissociation no longer had a differential effect when we induced similar perceptual strategies in both tasks. Indeed, the results showed that prompting a nonanalytic strategy ensured performance above chance on both tasks. Conversely, inducing an analytic strategy drastically decreased both explicit and implicit performance. Furthermore, we noted that the nonanalytic strategy involved less extensive gaze scanning than the analytic strategy and that memory effects under this processing strategy were largely independent of gaze movement.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/11893

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