Reference : Here I am: the cortical correlates of visual self-recognition.
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/11790
Here I am: the cortical correlates of visual self-recognition.
English
Devue, Christel mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Psychologie cognitive >]
Collette, Fabienne mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Neuropsychologie - Département des sciences cognitives >]
Balteau, Evelyne mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Degueldre, Christian mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Luxen, André mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de chimie (sciences) > Chimie organique de synthèse - Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Maquet, Pierre mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Neurologie Sart Tilman >]
Brédart, Serge mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Psychologie cognitive - Doyen de la Faculté de Psychologie et des sc. de l'éducation >]
2007
Brain Research
Elsevier Science
1143
169-82
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0006-8993
Amsterdam
The Netherlands
[en] Recently, interest in the neural correlates of self-recognition has grown. Most studies concentrate on self-face recognition. However, there is a lack of convergence as to precise neuroanatomical locations underlying self-face recognition. In addition, recognition of familiar persons from bodies has been relatively neglected. In the present study, cerebral activity while participants performed a task in which they had to indicate the real appearance of themselves and of a gender-matched close colleague among intact and altered pictures of faces and bodies was measured. The right frontal cortex and the insula were found to be the main regions specifically implicated in visual self-recognition compared with visual processing of other highly familiar persons. Moreover, the right anterior insula along with the right anterior cingulate seemed to play a role in the integration of information about oneself independently of the stimulus domain. The processing of self-related pictures was also compared to scrambled versions of these pictures. Results showed that different areas of the occipito-temporal cortex were more or less recruited depending on whether a face or a body was perceived, as it has already been reported by several recent studies. The implication of present findings for a general framework of person identification is discussed.
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/11790
10.1016/j.brainres.2007.01.055

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