Reference : Seasonal plasticity in the song control system - Multiple brain sites of steroid hormone...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Anatomy (cytology, histology, embryology...) & physiology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/11642
Seasonal plasticity in the song control system - Multiple brain sites of steroid hormone action and the importance of variation in song behavior
English
Ball, Gregory F. [> > > >]
Auger, Catherine J. [> > > >]
Bernard, Daniel J. [> > > >]
Charlier, Thierry mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences biomédicales et précliniques > Biologie de la différenciation sexuelle du cerveau >]
Sartor, Jennifer J. [> > > >]
Riters, Lauren V. [> > > >]
Balthazart, Jacques mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences biomédicales et précliniques > Biologie de la différenciation sexuelle du cerveau >]
2004
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
New York Academy of Sciences
1016
Immunology of Diabetes III
586-610
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0077-8923
New York
NY
[en] Animals ; Brain/physiology ; Hormones/physiology ; Neuronal Plasticity ; Seasons ; Songbirds/physiology ; Testosterone/physiology ; Vocalization, Animal/physiology
[en] Birdsong, in non-tropical species, is generally more common in spring and summer when males sing to attract mates and/or defend territories. Changes in the volumes of song control nuclei, such as HVC and the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA), are observed seasonally. Long photoperiods in spring stimulate the recrudescence of the testes and the release of testosterone. Androgen receptors, and at times estrogen receptors, are present in HVC and RA as are co-factors that facilitate the transcriptional activity of these receptors. Thus testosterone can act directly to induce changes in nucleus volume. However, dissociations have been identified at times among long photoperiods, maximal concentrations of testosterone, large song control nuclei, and high rates of song. One explanation of these dissociations is that song behavior itself can influence neural plasticity in the song system. Testosterone can act via brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) that is also released in HVC as a result of song activity. Testosterone could enhance song nucleus volume indirectly by acting in the preoptic area, a region regulating sexual behaviors, including song, that connects to the song system through catecholaminergic cells. Seasonal neuroplasticity in the song system involves an interplay among seasonal state, testosterone action, and behavioral activity.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/11642
also: http://hdl.handle.net/2268/13903
10.1196/annals.1298.043

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Restricted access
Papier 06 Ball et al2004NYAS.pdfNo commentaryPublisher postprint1.31 MBRequest copy

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.