Reference : Congenital infantile digital fibromatosis: a case report and review of the literature
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Dermatology
Congenital infantile digital fibromatosis: a case report and review of the literature
Failla, Valérie [Université de Liège - ULg > > Dermatologie >]
Wauters, Odile [Université de Liège - ULg > > Dermatologie >]
Tassoudji, Nazli [Université de Liège - ULg > > Dermatologie >]
Carlier, Alain mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Chirurgie de la main >]
André, Josette [> >]
Nikkels, Arjen mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Dermatologie >]
Rare Tumors
[en] fibromatosis ; imiquimod ; surgery ; childhood
[en] Infantile digital fibromatosis (IDF) is a rare benign fibroproliferative tumor of early childhood. IDF preferentially affects the fingers and the toes. Malignant transformation or metastases habe never been reported. Surgical treatment has been advocated previously but local recurrences were frequently observed. Recent literature supports clinical surveilllance without any medical or surgical intervention as spontaneous regression usually occurs after two to three years. A six-month-old Caucasian girl with IDF on the left fourth digit is presented here. The tumor progressively increased in size after birth. Topical imiquimod cream and diflucortolone valerate cream, both displaying antifibrotic properties, had no effect on tumor growth. Currently, the lesion size remains stable without any treatment. Early recognition of IDF is important in order to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention that may prove to be potentially aggravating, unless serious functional or cosmetic concerns intervene. Parents should be rassured concerning the benign nature of IDF and be informed that spontaneous involution of IDF might be expected.

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