Reference : Risk of upper gastrointestinal cancer after bariatric operations
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Endocrinology, metabolism & nutrition
Human health sciences : Oncology
Human health sciences : Surgery
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/1127
Risk of upper gastrointestinal cancer after bariatric operations
English
De Roover, Arnaud mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Chirurgie abdominale- endocrinienne et de transplantation >]
Detry, Olivier mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Chirurgie abdominale- endocrinienne et de transplantation >]
Desaive, Claude [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Chirurgie abdominale- endocrinienne et de transplantation >]
Maweja, Sylvie mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Chirurgie abdominale- endocrinienne et de transplantation >]
Coimbra Marques, Carla mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Chirurgie abdominale- endocrinienne et de transplantation >]
Honore, Pierre mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Chirurgie abdominale- endocrinienne et de transplantation >]
Meurisse, Michel mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Chirurgicale abdominale]
Dec-2006
Obesity Surgery
F D-Communications Inc
16
12
1656-1661
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0960-8923
Toronto
[en] cancer ; morbid obesity ; bariatric surgery ; Barrett's esophagus ; metaplasia
[en] The authors discuss the potential influence of obesity surgery on the risk of cancer, focusing on the upper GI tract directly affected by operations. There is currently no substantiation for an increased risk of cancer after bariatric surgery, because there are only about 25 reports of subsequent cancer of the esophagus and the stomach. However, this review emphasizes the need to detect potential precancerous conditions before surgery. Candidates for postoperative endoscopic surveillance may include patients >15 years after gastric surgery, but also patients symptomatic for gastroesophageal reflux disease in whom a high incidence of Barrett's metaplasia has been reported. The greatest concern is a delay in diagnosis from inadequate investigation due to mistaking serious upper GI symptoms as a consequence of the past operation.
Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/1127

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Open access
ObesSurg.2006.ADR.pdfAuthor postprint142.61 kBView/Open

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.