Reference : Tomographie a emission de positons: un premier bilan.
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Oncology
Human health sciences : Radiology, nuclear medicine & imaging
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/11168
Tomographie a emission de positons: un premier bilan.
French
[en] Positron emission tomography in oncology: an update
Jerusalem, Guy mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Oncologie médicale >]
Withofs, Nadia mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Médecine nucléaire >]
Rorive, Andrée mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Oncologie médicale >]
Hustinx, Roland mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Médecine nucléaire >]
2007
Revue du Praticien (La)
J. B. Bailliere et Fils
57
17
1864-70
Yes (verified by ORBi)
National
0035-2640
Paris
France
[en] Fluorodeoxyglucose F18/diagnostic use ; Humans ; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/diagnosis ; Neoplasms/diagnosis ; Patient Selection ; Positron-Emission Tomography ; Radiopharmaceuticals/diagnostic use
[en] Positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely used for several years for staging and response evaluation in oncology. It is time to critically review its role in routine patient care. [18F]-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG) remains the radiotracer of choice in most indications. Its high sensitivity, the half-life of 110 minutes and the easy production of this radiotracer explain its routine use although the specificity is not very good. Infectious or inflammatory processes can mimic tumours. Appropriate selection of patients studied in the recommended indications and interpretation of images by an experienced team having access to both clinical information and other diagnostic studies allows reducing the risk of false positives. Although PET is highly accurate, not all patients suffering from cancer need a PET study. Major improvements were also observed with conventional imaging techniques over the past 10 years. It is important to avoid long waiting lists because otherwise treatment delay may counterbalance the benefit of PET studies.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/11168

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Restricted access
Jerusalem G et al, Rev Prat 2007.pdfPublisher postprint971.26 kBRequest copy

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.