Reference : Quantification of lipid bilayer effective microviscosity and fluidity effect induced ...
Scientific journals : Article
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Physics
Human health sciences : Anesthesia & intensive care
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/11110
Quantification of lipid bilayer effective microviscosity and fluidity effect induced by propofol
English
Bahri, Mohamed Ali mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de physique > Imagerie médicale expérimentale > >]
Heyne, Belinda [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de physique > Spectroscopie biomédicale > >]
Hans, Pol [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Anesthésie et réanimation >]
Seret, Alain mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de physique > Imagerie médicale expérimentale >]
Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de l'oxygène : Recherche et développement (C.O.R.D.) >]
Hoebeke, Maryse mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de physique > Spectroscopie biomédicale >]
Apr-2005
Biophysical Chemistry
Elsevier Science
114
1
53-61
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0301-4622
Amsterdam
The Netherlands
[en] Electron spin resonance ; ESR ; Viscosity ; Liposome ; Propofol
[en] Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy with nitroxide spin probes was used as a method to probe the liposome microenvironments. The effective microviscosities have been determined from the calibration of the ESR spectra of the probes in solvent mixtures of known viscosities. In the first time, by measuring ESR order parameter (S ) and correlation time (s c) of stearic spin probes, we have been able to quantify the value of effective microviscosity at different depths inside the liposome membrane. At room temperature, local microviscosities measured in dimyristoyl-l-a phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) liposome membrane at the different depths of 7.8, 16.95, and 27.7 2 were 222.53, 64.09, and 62.56 cP, respectively. In the gel state (10 °C), those microviscosity values increased to 472.56, 370.61, and 243.37 cP. In a second time, we have applied this technique to determine the modifications in membrane microviscosity induced by 2,6-diisopropyl phenol (propofol; PPF), an anaesthetic agent extensively used in clinical practice. Propofol is characterized by a unique phenolic structure, absent in the other conventional anaesthetics. Indeed, given its lipophilic property, propofol is presumed to penetrate into and interact with membrane lipids and hence to induce changes in membrane fluidity. Incorporation of propofol into dimyristoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine liposomes above the phase-transition temperature (23.9 °C) did not change microviscosity. At 10 °C, an increase of propofol concentration from 0 to 1.0 10
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/11110
10.1016/j.bpc.2004.11.006
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/03014622
The original publication is available at www.sciencedirect.com.
The authors thank Elsevier for allowing deposit of their final version on the institutional repository.

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