Reference : Regional brain activity during working memory tasks
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
Human health sciences : Neurology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/110040
Regional brain activity during working memory tasks
English
Salmon, Eric mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Neuroimagerie des troubles de la mémoire et révalid. cogn. >]
Van der Linden, Martial mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
Collette, Fabienne mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cognitives > Neuropsychologie >]
Delfiore, Guy [> > > >]
Maquet, Pierre mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron]
Degueldre, Christian mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Luxen, André mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de chimie (sciences) > Chimie organique de synthèse - Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Franck, Georges [Université de Liège - ULg > > Relations académiques et scientifiques (Médecine) >]
Oct-1996
Brain
Oxford University Press
119
Pt 5
1617-1625
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0006-8950
[en] Working memory ; Central executive ; PET
[de] ka-central executive ; Ka-PET ; Ka-WORKING MEMORY
[en] The first aim of our PET study was to replicate previous findings concerning the brain areas activated by a verbal working memory task. The second aim was to specify the neural basis of the central executive, using a task of working memory updating. Our data confirm that the lower left supramarginal gyms and premotor area are the key regions subserving short-term verbal memory processes. They also suggest that the updating memory task is related to mid-dorsolateral prefrontal activation most probably responsible for the updating function of the central executive. An unexpected, predominantly right activation occurred in the inferior parietal region during the verbal memory updating task, which we related to a visuospatial strategy used to maintain the information in short-term memory. A third purpose was to explore the brain regions activated by a nonverbal, visual memory task, and our results confirm the importance of the superior occipital gyrus in the visual short-term memory.
Centre de Recherches du Cyclotron - CRC
Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (Communauté française de Belgique) - F.R.S.-FNRS
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/110040

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