Reference : Electrophysiological correlates of behavioural changes in vigilance in vegetative sta...
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Neurology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/109000
Electrophysiological correlates of behavioural changes in vigilance in vegetative state and minimally conscious state.
English
Landsness, Eric [Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI, USA > > > >]
Bruno, Marie-Aurélie mailto [coma science group, centre de recherches du cyclotron ULg & service de neurologie CHU de Liège > > > >]
Noirhomme, Quentin mailto [coma science group, centre de recherches du cyclotron ULg & service de neurologie CHU de Liège coma science group, centre de recherches du cyclotron ULg & service de neurologie CHU de Liège > > > >]
Riedner, Brady [Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI, USA > > > >]
Gosseries, Olivia mailto [coma science group, centre de recherches du cyclotron ULg & service de neurologie CHU de Liège > > > >]
Schnakers, Caroline mailto [coma science group, centre de recherches du cyclotron ULg & service de neurologie CHU de Liège > > > >]
Massimini, Marcello [Department of Clinical Sciences, ‘Luigi Sacco’, University of Milan, Milan, Italy > > > >]
Laureys, Steven mailto [coma science group, centre de recherches du cyclotron ULg & service de neurologie CHU de Liège > > > >]
Tononi, Giulio [Department of Clinical Sciences, ‘Luigi Sacco’, University of Milan, Milan, Italy > > > >]
Boly, Mélanie mailto [coma science group, centre de recherches du cyclotron ULg & service de neurologie CHU de Liège > > > >]
2011
Brain : A Journal of Neurology
Oxford University Press
134
Pt 8
2222-32
Yes (verified by ORBi)
0006-8950
1460-2156
Oxford
United Kingdom
[en] Adult ; Aged ; Arousal/physiology ; Brain Mapping ; Electroencephalography/methods ; Electromyography ; Electrophysiological Phenomena ; Female ; Humans ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Persistent Vegetative State/pathology/physiopathology ; Sleep/physiology ; Sleep Disorders/etiology ; Sleep, REM/physiology ; Time Factors ; Young Adult
[en] The existence of normal sleep in patients in a vegetative state is still a matter of debate. Previous electrophysiological sleep studies in patients with disorders of consciousness did not differentiate patients in a vegetative state from patients in a minimally conscious state. Using high-density electroencephalographic sleep recordings, 11 patients with disorders of consciousness (six in a minimally conscious state, five in a vegetative state) were studied to correlate the electrophysiological changes associated with sleep to behavioural changes in vigilance (sustained eye closure and muscle inactivity). All minimally conscious patients showed clear electroencephalographic changes associated with decreases in behavioural vigilance. In the five minimally conscious patients showing sustained behavioural sleep periods, we identified several electrophysiological characteristics typical of normal sleep. In particular, all minimally conscious patients showed an alternating non-rapid eye movement/rapid eye movement sleep pattern and a homoeostatic decline of electroencephalographic slow wave activity through the night. In contrast, for most patients in a vegetative state, while preserved behavioural sleep was observed, the electroencephalographic patterns remained virtually unchanged during periods with the eyes closed compared to periods of behavioural wakefulness (eyes open and muscle activity). No slow wave sleep or rapid eye movement sleep stages could be identified and no homoeostatic regulation of sleep-related slow wave activity was observed over the night-time period. In conclusion, we observed behavioural, but no electrophysiological, sleep wake patterns in patients in a vegetative state, while there were near-to-normal patterns of sleep in patients in a minimally conscious state. These results shed light on the relationship between sleep electrophysiology and the level of consciousness in severely brain-damaged patients. We suggest that the study of sleep and homoeostatic regulation of slow wave activity may provide a complementary tool for the assessment of brain function in minimally conscious state and vegetative state patients.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/109000
10.1093/brain/awr152

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Open access
Landsness_Bruno_Brain2011.pdfPublisher postprint3.48 MBView/Open

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.