Reference : The Neural Substrates of Memory Suppression: A fMRI Exploration of Directed Forgetting
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/108975
The Neural Substrates of Memory Suppression: A fMRI Exploration of Directed Forgetting
English
Bastin, Christine mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Feyers, Dorothée mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Neuroimagerie des troubles de la mémoire et révalid. cogn. >]
Majerus, Steve mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
Balteau, Evelyne mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Degueldre, Christian mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Luxen, André mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de chimie (sciences) > Chimie organique de synthèse >]
Maquet, Pierre mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Salmon, Eric mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Neuroimagerie des troubles de la mémoire et révalid. cogn. >]
Collette, Fabienne mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Neuropsychologie >]
2012
PLoS ONE
Public Library of Science
7
1
e29905
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1932-6203
San Franscisco
CA
[en] The directed forgetting paradigm is frequently used to determine the ability to voluntarily suppress information. However, little is known about brain areas associated with information to forget. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine brain activity during the encoding and retrieval phases of an item-method directed forgetting recognition task with neutral verbal material in order to apprehend all processing stages that information to forget and to remember undergoes. We hypothesized that regions supporting few selective processes, namely recollection and familiarity memory processes, working memory, inhibitory and selection processes should be differentially activated during the processing of to-be-remembered and to-be-forgotten items. Successful encoding and retrieval of items to remember engaged the entorhinal cortex, the hippocampus, the anterior medial prefrontal cortex, the left inferior parietal cortex, the posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneus; this set of regions is well known to support deep and associative encoding and retrieval processes in episodic memory. For items to forget, encoding was associated with higher activation in the right middle frontal and posterior parietal cortex, regions known to intervene in attentional control. Items to forget but nevertheless correctly recognized at retrieval yielded activation in the dorsomedial thalamus, associated with familiarity-based memory processes and in the posterior intraparietal sulcus and the anterior cingulate cortex, involved in attentional processes.
Centre de Recherches du Cyclotron - CRC ; Centre de Neurosciences Cognitives et Comportementales
Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (Communauté française de Belgique) - F.R.S.-FNRS ; InterUniversity Attraction Pole (IAP P6/29) ; French Speaking Community Concerted Research Action (ARC-06/11-340)
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/108975
http://reflexions.ulg.ac.be/MemorySuppression
The first two authors equally contributed to the manuscript

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