Reference : Effects of hydrated lime and quicklime on the decay of buried human remains using pig ca...
Scientific journals : Article
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Earth sciences & physical geography
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/107339
Effects of hydrated lime and quicklime on the decay of buried human remains using pig cadavers as human body analogues.
English
Schotsmans, E. M. mailto [> > > >]
Denton, J. [> > > >]
Dekeirsschieter, Jessica mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Sciences agronomiques > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive]
Ivaneanu, T. [> > > >]
Leentjes, S. [> > > >]
Janaway, R. C. [> > > >]
Wilson, A. S. [> > > >]
2011
Forensic Science International
Elsevier Science Ireland
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0379-0738
1872-6283
Limerick
Ireland
[en] taphonomy ; pig cadavers ; lime ; differential decomposition ; desiccation ; histology
[en] Recent casework in Belgium involving the search for human remains buried with lime, demonstrated the need for more detailed understanding of the effect of different types of lime on cadaver decomposition and its micro-environment. Six pigs (Sus scrofa) were used as body analogues in field experiments. They were buried without lime, with hydrated lime (Ca(OH)(2)) and with quicklime (CaO) in shallow graves in sandy loam soil in Belgium and recovered after 6months of burial. Observations from these field recoveries informed additional laboratory experiments that were undertaken at the University of Bradford, UK. The combined results of these studies demonstrate that despite conflicting evidence in the literature, hydrated lime and quicklime both delay the decay of the carcass during the first 6months. This study has implications for the investigation of clandestine burials and for a better understanding of archaeological plaster burials. Knowledge of the effects of lime on decomposition processes also has bearing on practices involving burial of animal carcasses and potentially the management of mass graves and mass disasters by humanitarian organisations and DVI teams.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/107339
10.1016/j.forsciint.2011.09.025
Copyright (c) 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Open access
Schotsmans_Lime_FSI-Postprint auteur.pdfAuthor postprint744.7 kBView/Open

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.