Reference : Facilitation of Responses to Motor Cortex Stimulation: Effects of Isometric Voluntary Co...
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Neurology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/106639
Facilitation of Responses to Motor Cortex Stimulation: Effects of Isometric Voluntary Contraction
English
Maertens De Noordhout, Alain mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Neurologie CHR >]
PEPIN, Jean-Louis mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Neurologie CHR]
GERARD, Pascale [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Neurologie CHR >]
Delwaide, Paul mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Services généraux (Faculté de médecine) > Relations académiques et scientifiques (Médecine)]
1992
Annals of Neurology
Wiley Liss
32
3
365-70
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0364-5134
1531-8249
New York
NY
[en] Adult ; Electromyography ; Female ; Humans ; Isometric Contraction/physiology ; Magnetics ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Motor Cortex/physiology ; Reaction Time ; Reflex/physiology ; Vibration ; Volition
[en] In 7 normal subjects we compared the facilitatory effect of isometric contraction of the tibialis anterior on the size of electromyographic responses evoked in this muscle by electric stimuli applied over the cervical column and by electric and magnetic percutaneous stimulation of the motor cortex. No significant difference was found between the degrees of facilitation of the responses to any of the stimuli. Using collision techniques, we also showed that the pyramidal fibers activated by spinal and cortical stimuli are the same. Facilitation induced by isometric contraction (20% maximum) was of similar or greater magnitude than that found with constant vibration of the tendon of the target muscle. In cases where vibration and contraction had equal facilitatory effects, there was no further facilitation of the responses when both conditions were applied together. These findings indicate that the facilitatory effect of isometric contraction of the target muscle essentially originates at a spinal level rather than in the motor cortex.
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/106639
also: http://hdl.handle.net/2268/106680
10.1002/ana.410320310

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