Reference : Inter- and Intraspecific Genetic Biodiversity in South East Asian Rodents: New Insigh...
Parts of books : Contribution to collective works
Life sciences : Genetics & genetic processes
Life sciences : Zoology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/105101
Inter- and Intraspecific Genetic Biodiversity in South East Asian Rodents: New Insights for Their Conservation
English
Pagès, Marie [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Génétique >]
Latinne, Alice mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Génétique >]
Michaux, Johan mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Génétique >]
2011
Biodiversity Hotspots
Zachos, F. E.
Habel, J. C.
Springer
363-382
978-3-642-20991-8
Berlin Heidelberg
[en] Southeast Asia ; biodiversity ; rodent
[en] South East Asia displays a high level of mammal endemism and the
highest number of threatened and data deficient mammal species. However, the
South East Asian biodiversity is still highly unexplored. Because of the runaway
global changes, a better biological knowledge of this region is urgently required to
improve the conservation and the management of its biodiversity.
The first aim of this chapter is to present recent published data on a biodiversity
inventory of the Rattini murine rodents from this region based on molecular markers
(Page`s et al., 2009). In this first study, we applied the method proposed by Pons et al.
(2006) that determines with no a priori the locations of ancestral nodes that define
putative species in order to investigate the current taxonomy of the Rattini tribe.
Our second aim concerns the intraspecific genetic structure of a rare and
threatened South East Asian mammal species: the murine rodent Leopoldamys
neilli, endemic to karst habitats . In this latter study, our results evidenced a high
geographic structure of the genetic diversity of this species. The observed highly
divergent genetic lineages would have to be considered as distinct evolutionary
units or at least as Management units. These results are essential for the best
conservation issues of species endemic to karsts and to South East Asia, in general.
In this chapter, we therefore highlight that South East Asia would not be only a
hotspot of interspecific but also of intraspecific biodiversity.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/105101

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