Reference : Spontaneous neural activity during human non-rapid eye movement sleep.
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Neurology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/104708
Spontaneous neural activity during human non-rapid eye movement sleep.
English
Mascetti, Laura mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron]
Foret, Ariane mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron]
Shaffii, Anahita mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Muto, Vincenzo mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron]
Kussé, Caroline mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron]
Jaspar, Mathieu mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Neuropsychologie]
Matarazzo, Luca [> > > >]
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Neurologie]
Schabus, Manuel [> > > >]
Maquet, Pierre mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron]
2011
Progress in Brain Research
Elsevier
193
111-8
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0079-6123
1875-7855
Amsterdam
The Netherlands
[en] Recent neuroimaging studies characterized the neural correlates of slow waves and spindles during human non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. They showed that significant activity was consistently associated with slow (> 140 muV) and delta waves (75-140 muV) during NREM sleep in several cortical areas including inferior frontal, medial prefrontal, precuneus, and posterior cingulate cortices. Unexpectedly, slow waves were also associated with transient responses in the pontine tegmentum and in the cerebellum. On the other hand, spindles were associated with a transient activity in the thalami, paralimbic areas (anterior cingulate and insular cortices), and superior temporal gyri. Moreover, slow spindles (11-13 Hz) were associated with increased activity in the superior frontal gyrus. In contrast, fast spindles (13-15 Hz) recruited a set of cortical regions involved in sensorimotor processing, as well as the mesial frontal cortex and hippocampus. These findings indicate that human NREM sleep is an active state during which brain activity is temporally organized by spontaneous oscillations (spindles and slow oscillation) in a regionally specific manner. The functional significance of these NREM sleep oscillations is currently interpreted in terms of synaptic homeostasis and memory consolidation.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/104708
10.1016/B978-0-444-53839-0.00008-9
Copyright (c) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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