Reference : Influence of anesthesia on cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate, and brain funct...
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Neurology
Human health sciences : Anesthesia & intensive care
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/104238
Influence of anesthesia on cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolic rate, and brain functional connectivity.
English
BONHOMME, Vincent mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Anesthésie et réanimation]
BOVEROUX, Pierre mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Anesthésie et réanimation]
HANS, Pol [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Anesthésie et réanimation]
Brichant, Jean-François mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron]
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences cliniques > Neurologie]
Boly, Mélanie mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron]
Laureys, Steven mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron]
2011
Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
24
5
474-9
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0952-7907
1473-6500
Philadelphia
PA
[en] PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To describe recent studies exploring brain function under the influence of hypnotic anesthetic agents, and their implications on the understanding of consciousness physiology and anesthesia-induced alteration of consciousness. RECENT FINDINGS: Cerebral cortex is the primary target of the hypnotic effect of anesthetic agents, and higher-order association areas are more sensitive to this effect than lower-order processing regions. Increasing concentration of anesthetic agents progressively attenuates connectivity in the consciousness networks, while connectivity in lower-order sensory and motor networks is preserved. Alteration of thalamic sub-cortical regulation could compromise the cortical integration of information despite preserved thalamic activation by external stimuli. At concentrations producing unresponsiveness, the activity of consciousness networks becomes anticorrelated with thalamic activity, while connectivity in lower-order sensory networks persists, although with cross-modal interaction alterations. SUMMARY: Accumulating evidence suggests that hypnotic anesthetic agents disrupt large-scale cerebral connectivity. This would result in an inability of the brain to generate and integrate information, while external sensory information is still processed at a lower order of complexity.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/104238
10.1097/ACO.0b013e32834a12a1

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