Reference : Application of molecular techniques to monitor the evolution of bacterial consortia comp...
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Poster
Life sciences : Microbiology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/100584
Application of molecular techniques to monitor the evolution of bacterial consortia composed of Clostridium sp. in a hydrogen producing bioreactor
English
[en] Application of molecular techniques to monitor the evolution of bacterial consortia composed of Clostridium sp. in a hydrogen producing bioreactor
Calusinska, Magdalena mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre d'ingénierie des protéines >]
Savichtcheva, Olga [ > > ]
Joris, Bernard mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Physiologie et génétique bactériennes >]
Masset, Julien mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Biochimie et microbiologie industrielles >]
Hamilton, Christopher [Université de Liège - ULg > > Centre Wallon de biologie industrielle >]
Hiligsmann, Serge mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Biochimie et microbiologie industrielles >]
Thonart, Philippe mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Biochimie et microbiologie industrielles >]
Wilmotte, Annick mailto [Université de Liège - ULg > Département des sciences de la vie > Physiologie et génétique bactériennes >]
11-Dec-2009
No
National
Analyzing complex microbial communities and their host microbe interactions
11 December 2011
Belgian Society for Microbiology
Brussels
Belgium
[en] Clostridium ; microbial consortia
[en] Our current dependence on fossil fuels as the primary energy source contributes to global climate change, environmental degradation and health problems. Hydrogen offers a tremendous potential as a clean, renewable energy currency and it is compatible with electrochemical and combustion processes for energy conversion without producing carbon – based emissions. Many microorganisms, especially photosynthetic as well as facultative and anaerobic bacteria have been reported to produce large amounts of hydrogen from soluble and insoluble biomass. Clostridia, being obligate anaerobes, are capable of biogas production during ‘dark fermentation’ of a wide range of carbohydrates.
In this ARC project, entitled Micro – H2 we have focused on a new direction in bio – hydrogen production systems which is the use of mixed cultures of microorganisms (consortia). We expect that the combination of complementary metabolisms could significantly increase the efficiencies of mixed systems compared to monocultures. However, a few fundamental studies need to be carried out in order to investigate and improve the stability of microbial populations involved in the processes. It is now recognised that molecular microbial ecology tools provide the scientific basis to monitor the processes used in environmental biotechnology. To characterize the diversity of bacterial communities, quantitative techniques such as Real – Time Quantitative PCR and FISH (Fluorescence in situ hybridization) and semi – quantitative DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis) have been optimized and applied on different bioreactor samples. This approach enabled for the temporal monitoring of the evolution of bacterial consortia, both in terms of species dominance and their metabolic activity. Molecular analysis of bacterial consortia allowed for careful examination of interactions between different bacterial species within a consortium, which is crucial in the stabilization of the hydrogen production process.
Researchers ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/100584

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