References of "Poster"
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See detailMicrowave – assisted synthesis of carbohydrate compounds, focus on uronic acid derivatives.
Laurent, Pascal ULg; Richel, Aurore ULg; Wathelet, Bernard ULg et al

Poster (2010, May)

At the moment, biorefining is increasingly seen as a promising alternative to petrochemical sector since it targets both the replacement of part of petroleum as a source of energy and the development of ... [more ▼]

At the moment, biorefining is increasingly seen as a promising alternative to petrochemical sector since it targets both the replacement of part of petroleum as a source of energy and the development of chemicals from the biomass, such as detergents, phytopharmaceutics, solvents, plastics, etc. The valorisation of carbohydrates arising from the hydrolysis of renewable feedstocks is therefore an area of outmost interest. In this context, uronic acids such as glucuronic acid (GlcA) or galacturonic acid (GalA) derived from widely available raw material such as hemicellulose or pectins represent important biocompatible and bioresorbable starting material. The quest of highly effective, environmentally friendly and straightforward chemical strategies to transform totally O-unprotected uronic acids into high valuable materials remains actually a particularly challenging task. A new strategy enabling the quantitative “one-pot” production of water-soluble monosubstituted D-glucofuranosidurono-6,3-lactones from unprotected D-glucuronic acid (D-GlcA) involving microwaves and an inexpensive siliceous-based promoter will be described. The use of a heterogeneous acid catalytic systems consisting of sulfuric acid impregnated onto silica (H2SO4/SiG60) or onto carbon (H2SO4/C), offers a green alternative to unrecyclable liquid sulfuric acid and permit the developpment of a truly eco-friendly green process, as these supported acids were readily separated from liquid products, without neutralization, by decantation or filtration, thus minimizing energy consumption and wastes. Faced with environmental concerns, this solventless methodology offers attractive features, including short reaction times, high yields and easy set-up and workup. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh-resolution measurements and modelling of the Cape Ghir upwelling filament during the CAIBEX survey
Troupin, Charles ULg; Sangrà, Pablo; Arístegui, Javier et al

Poster (2010, April 26)

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See detailDecadal changes of carbon dioxide in the Southern North Sea
Harlay, Jérôme ULg; Delille, Bruno ULg; Borges, Alberto ULg

Poster (2010, April 26)

Since late 2000, we have acquired partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) data underway with an equilibrator coupled to an infra-red gas analyser on all the cruises carried out on RV Belgica. Here, we discuss the ... [more ▼]

Since late 2000, we have acquired partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) data underway with an equilibrator coupled to an infra-red gas analyser on all the cruises carried out on RV Belgica. Here, we discuss the decadal changes of pCO2 during winter-time in the Southern North Sea. The trends are faster than those reported in open oceanic waters, although strongly modulated by inter-annual variability that seems to be related to the North Atlantic Oscillation. [less ▲]

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See detailAnnular Groove Phase Mask coronagraph in diamond for mid-IR wavelengths
Delacroix, Christian ULg; Mawet, Dimitri; Surdej, Jean ULg et al

Poster (2010, April 25)

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See detailDevelopment of an analytical method to determine the cryolitic bath composition by Raman spectroscopy
Malherbe, Cédric ULg; Gilbert, Bernard ULg

Poster (2010, April 23)

Since the end of the nineteenth century, metallic aluminium is produced by electro-deposition from a solution of aluminium oxide in cryolitic melts around 1000°C (Hall-Héroult process). The industrial ... [more ▼]

Since the end of the nineteenth century, metallic aluminium is produced by electro-deposition from a solution of aluminium oxide in cryolitic melts around 1000°C (Hall-Héroult process). The industrial melt is composed mostly of cryolite (Na3AlF6) and AlF3 and is characterized by the molar NaF/AlF3 ratio, named cryolitic ratio (CR). It turns out that the bath composition is critical: for instance, it has been shown that a small change in the Al2O3 content leads to a great change in the overvoltage required for the electrolysis. Therefore controlling the melt composition is very important in order to reduce the energy lost. Unfortunately no in situ analytical method allows studying the composition of the melt yet. Considering our experience in the study of such highly corrosive media by Raman spectroscopy and since the bath spectrum is function of both the CR and the Al2O3 content, we have proposed in the past to apply that technique to the direct determination of the melt composition. Despite the CR could be well evaluated in the lab, experimental problems however made the practical application difficult. The purpose of this presentation will be to show the new results obtained on an updated instrument: - Spectra are recorded in 20 s or less with a higher quality than before. - The previously developed home-made software was adapted to the updated instrument and various spectra analysis procedures are under study. - A procedure to prepare reference samples was also developed taking into account the homogeneity problems that have been met. - The slopes of the alumina calibration curves are depending on the bath CR, in confirmation of our previous results. - The new results are compared with the previous ones. It will be concluded that Raman spectroscopy is indeed becoming a suitable technique for developing an analytical method to determine the composition of industrial cryolitic melts. [less ▲]

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See detailA regional flux-based risk assessment approach of contaminated sites on groundwater bodies
Brouyère, Serge ULg; Jamin, Pierre ULg; Dollé, Fabien ULg et al

Poster (2010, April 22)

In the context of the water framework directive, management plans have to be set up about water quality in surface and groundwater bodies in the EU. One of the first steps is to evaluate the risk of ... [more ▼]

In the context of the water framework directive, management plans have to be set up about water quality in surface and groundwater bodies in the EU. One of the first steps is to evaluate the risk of contamination of these water resources, and particularly the risk posed by contaminated industrial sites. From the perspective of water resource management, each of these sites taken individually does not necessary constitute a major threat. However, in heavily industrialised and urbanised areas, the cumulative effect of multiple contaminant sources is likely to present a risk. In order to propose adequate but still economically reliable measures, the calculated risk should be based on a so-called megasite approaches using criteria reflecting the water quality deterioration, in a cumulative way, at the scale of the whole surface water or groundwater body. A GIS-based regional risk assessment approach is developed here for groundwater bodies using the SEQ-ESO currently used within the Walloon Region as indicator to reflect the quality status of the groundwater body. The approach is applied on the groundwater body RWM073 “Gravels and alluvial deposits of the Meuse river between Engis and Herstal”, identified at risk of not reaching a good quality status by 2015. The different steps of this methodology consist of an inventory of proved or potential contaminating industrial sites, a numerical modelling of pollutants behaviour at the scale of the groundwater body and the application of the SEQ-ESO that finally gives a global quality status of the whole groundwater body. This analysis also serves as basis for a socio-economic approach intending to provide indications on costs and benefits generated by total or partial remediation of the contaminated groundwater bodies according to the different management scenarios. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysically-based groundwater vulnerability assessment for groundwater protection and land-use management
Popescu, Ileana-Cristina; Brouyère, Serge ULg; Derouane, Johan et al

Poster (2010, April 22)

Numerous groundwater vulnerability and risk mapping techniques have been developed taking into consideration a variable number of factors. Most common techniques produce maps of indexes based on a ... [more ▼]

Numerous groundwater vulnerability and risk mapping techniques have been developed taking into consideration a variable number of factors. Most common techniques produce maps of indexes based on a relatively empirical combination of weighted factors reflecting the protective effect of underground formations overlying the groundwater resource. The limitation of such methods is related to their use of a qualitative definition of groundwater vulnerability, as opposed to a definition based on a quantitative description of contaminant migration. A physically-based point of view and definition of the vulnerability is proposed and based on three factors describing a pollution event, which are the contaminant transfer time from the hazard location to the 'target', the contamination duration at the 'target' and the level of contaminant concentration reached at the 'target'. This concept allows a clear distinction between conventional aspects and physically-based results in the building of a final vulnerability indicator. This methodology has the further advantage to consider the possible impact of runoff conditions occurring at the land surface and possibly leading to lateral contamination of groundwater through downstream preferential infiltration features, such as karstic features. Practically, this method needs to describe and simulate the pollutant migration in the unsaturated zone and possibly in the saturated zone in order to assess the breakthrough curve at the 'target'. Preliminary application is illustrated on a case-study located in a Néblon limestone basin in Belgium, one of the main groundwater resources for the city of Liège in the Meuse basin. Perspectives are proposed towards a generalisation of the vulnerability concept for risk assessment within a pressure - state - impact framework. [less ▲]

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See detailHow Climate Change Could Affect The Hydrology In Walloon Region ?
Bauwens, Alexandra ULg; Sohier, Catherine ULg; Degre, Aurore ULg

Poster (2010, April 22)

Research on climate change and its impacts on hydrology are increasingly important nowadays. AMICE project focuses on the adaptation of the Meuse to the impacts of climate change. On this study, we focus ... [more ▼]

Research on climate change and its impacts on hydrology are increasingly important nowadays. AMICE project focuses on the adaptation of the Meuse to the impacts of climate change. On this study, we focus on the Walloon tributaries of the Meuse river, and more specifically on the Vesdre and the Lesse sub-catchments. Climate change scenarios are outputs of the CCI-HYDR Perturbation Tool for time slice 2020-2050 and 2070-2100. This tool allows us to build climate change time series and to use it as input of our hydrological models. The most pessimistic and the most optimistic scenarios are selected. The hydrological model used is called EPICGrid and it is a physically based distributed model at catchment scale. EPICGrid used the perturbed meteorological data to provide hydrograms for the different scenarios and time slice for the Vesdre and the Lesse sub-catchments. It appears that for the Vesdre daily discharge with a return period of 100 years (Qd100) could varies between -3% and +27% when the mean annual 7-day Minimum flow with a return period of 50 years (MAM750) varies between -37% and +16% for 2070-2100. For the Lesse, Qd100 varies between -30% and +50% when MAM750 varies between -21% and +28% for 2070-2100. The broad range of discharge variations reflects the broad range of meteorological variation. These results will be used further in the AMICE project to build an adaptation strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailFlood Protection Design Based on Micro-scale Risk Modelling
Ernst, Julien ULg; Dewals, Benjamin ULg; Detrembleur, Sylvain ULg et al

Poster (2010, April 22)

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See detailMALDI MS Tissue Imaging of Crystallins using an original metyhod to direct protein identification on lens slices
Bertrand, Virginie ULg; Debois, Delphine ULg; Quinton, Loïc ULg et al

Poster (2010, April 16)

The lens is a transparent, biconvex structure in the eye that, along with the cornea, helps to refract light to be focused on the retina. Crystallins, α, β and γ, are the predominant structural proteins ... [more ▼]

The lens is a transparent, biconvex structure in the eye that, along with the cornea, helps to refract light to be focused on the retina. Crystallins, α, β and γ, are the predominant structural proteins in lens. They constitute 90% of water soluble proteins and contribute to its transparency and refractive properties by a uniform concentration gradient in the lens. Nevertheless, if these crystallins undergo post translational modifications, they become less soluble and the opacity of eye lens increases. This phenomenon defines cataract. Yet, the nature and the mechanism of occurring of these modifications and how they happen are not fully understood. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging is a recent technique allowing examining proteins in their native location without the need for traditional processing methods such as extraction, homogenization, and separation. Nevertheless, one main difficulty lies in the identification of the detected species, especially proteins. MALDI-In Source Decay (MALDI-ISD) is a fragmentation process occurring in the mass spectrometer ion source. When the analyzed sample is a protein, ISD fragmentation leads to b-, c- and z-ions series, which allows for some sequencing of the protein. One great advantage of ISD is its fastness and easiness to be implemented since there is no need for a special treatment of the sample. The only requirement is the use of “ISD-favourable MALDI matrix” such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid or 1,5-diaminonaphtalene. 18 µm-thick equatorial sections of frozen porcine eye lenses were realized with a cryostat. 1,5-DAN matrix was either manually deposited or sprayed with an ImagePrep automated device (Bruker Daltonics). Data were acquired with an UltraFlex II MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometer (BD) in positive reflector mode. For imaging experiments, the surface of the sample was divided into 100-µm-wide pixels and 500 shots were averaged on each. Based on calculated mass differences between consecutive ISD fragments peaks, tags of amino acids were established and submitted to a search in protein databases using a BLAST algorithm (search by sequence homology). Imaging experiments showed that the localization information may be very useful to associate fragments which exhibit close distributions, suggesting they are originating from the same protein. It is thus possible to arrange fragments in groups of probable origin and to extract the mass spectrum of a high-intensity pixel. This allows to work with a “purified” ISD mass spectrum where fragments of only one protein are present and potentially exhibiting a higher number of peaks, leading to a longer tag and to an easier identification. With this imaging strategy, we were able to identify (by homology) the Beta-Crystallins S and B2, the Gamma-Crystallin B, the Alpha-Crystallin A. [less ▲]

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See detailMALDI-TOF/TOF sequencing of peptide toxins from animal venoms
Quinton, Loïc ULg; Echterbille, Julien ULg; Gilles, Nicolas et al

Poster (2010, April 16)

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See detailNovel Relative ICPL Based Quantitative Phospho- and Glycoproteome Analysis Method
Fleron, Maximilien ULg; Greffe, Yannick ULg; Massart, Anne-Cécile ULg et al

Poster (2010, April 16)

Large scale proteomic analysis remains challenging partially because proteins are inhomogeneous and often influenced by a variety of structural modifications. In particular, these specific chemical ... [more ▼]

Large scale proteomic analysis remains challenging partially because proteins are inhomogeneous and often influenced by a variety of structural modifications. In particular, these specific chemical modifications called posttranslational modifications (PTM) are crucial determinants for the protein function and biological role. Up to now there have been a growing number of studies describing the enrichment and identification of PTM. However, a significant dearth of data offering a reliable methodology for PTM quantification does exist. The present work aims at developing a label based protein PTM quantification strategy and demonstrating its value on comparative analysis of cells originating from two distinct prostate metastasis sites. PC3 and LNCaP cells isolated from bone and lymph node prostate cancer metastasis sites respectively, were lysed and spiked with three non-human proteins serving as internal standards. Following this, the samples were reduced and alkylated, digested with trypsin and subjected to peptide ICPL (isotope coded protein label) labeling. The two peptide containing samples were joined together followed by the affinity isolation of phospho- (using TiO2 metal affinity chromatography) and glycopeptides (oxidized glycans were bound on hydrazide resin). The enriched fraction as well as the flow-through were analyzed on a 2D-(SCX and C18-RP)-nano-HPLC system. The peptide identification and quantification was conducted using electrospray ion-trap mass spectrometer (Bruker, HCT-ultra). Validation of the differentially modulated proteins was conducted in several biological and technical replicates using the label free MSe based quantification strategy. This PTM based, novel relative protein quantification using post-digest ICPL has detected over 598 individual proteins. Of these more than 95 % have been successfully quantified. PTM enrichment methodologies allowed an isolation rate of 91 % and 50 % for phosphorylated and glycosylated proteins respectively. The detailed comparison of PC3 and LNCaP cells has shown specific overexpression of selected proteins indicating differences between these two prostate metastatic cell lines. Several of these modulated proteins have been previously described to be related to prostate cancer (e.g. annexin A2 and vimentin) while others could be considered as potentially novel. These proteins might be implicated in the fundamental process related to metastasis dissemination. However, because of the known discrepancy between cell systems and clinical material, the present study can be regarded only as a step towards elucidation of these complex interactions. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of Spectral Colorimetric Measurements vs. Color Pictures in Dermatology
Blain, Pascal ULg; Michel, Fabrice; Moreau, Vincent et al

Poster (2010, April 13)

We studied scars and wounds depths and surfaces thanks to our interferometric fringes projector 3D scanner1, 2. Color information of a wound indicates its deterioration level. That’s why the visual color ... [more ▼]

We studied scars and wounds depths and surfaces thanks to our interferometric fringes projector 3D scanner1, 2. Color information of a wound indicates its deterioration level. That’s why the visual color restitution, as realistic as possible, is a highly important parameter. Firstly our acquired 3D pictures were color mapped with an image recorded by a RGB camera. The results were not efficient enough. In order to improve our technique and provide more precise information, we add a spectral characterization to the set-up. Before adding the spectral information and a realistic color mapping to the 3D measurements, we evaluate the performances of colorimetric measurements. The tests have been made on mice with scars on their back. [less ▲]

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See detailForecasting epidemic outbreaks ofwheat leaf blotch based on meteorological parameters
Junk, Jürgen; El Jarroudi, Moussa ULg; Pogoda, Frederik et al

Poster (2010, April 12)

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See detailMonitoring of surface interactions as a tool for nanoparticle design
Frost, R; Grandfils, Christian ULg; Kasemo, B et al

Poster (2010, April 07)

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See detailQuantitative determination of cannabinoids in serum by UHPLC/MS-MS
Dubois, Nathalie ULg; Paccou, A.; DE BACKER, Benjamin ULg et al

Poster (2010, April)

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See detailMICROPOLLUTANTS ISSUES: A MODELLING STUDY OF HEAVY METALS WITHIN TWO FRENCH BASINS AND A TEST APPLICATION TO COCAINE IN BELGIUM
Deliège, Jean-François ULg; Everbecq, Etienne ULg; Grard, Aline ULg et al

Poster (2010, April)

European policies (European Framework Directive: Water 2000/60/CE, Directive 76/464/CE) impose to reduce the releases of about a hundred substances in surface water. In the last years, the AQUAPOLE has ... [more ▼]

European policies (European Framework Directive: Water 2000/60/CE, Directive 76/464/CE) impose to reduce the releases of about a hundred substances in surface water. In the last years, the AQUAPOLE has been involved in two studies related to this matter. First, on the request and with the financial support of both the French Ministry of Environment and ONEMA (“Office National de l’Eau et des Milieux Aquatiques”), INERIS (“Institut National de l’Environnement Industriel et des Risques”) drew up the guidelines of a methodology allowing fixing the local Limit Values to Emission so as to abide by the quality standards on the whole watershed. Within this context, INERIS wishes to test the use of pollutant transfer models on pilot sub-basins. The PEGASE model has been used to simulate micropollutants on two concrete use cases (1): (iii) in the Meuse sub-basin, managed by the French Water Agency Rhine-Meuse, for simulations concerning cadmium and zinc; (iv) in the Adour sub-basin, managed by the French Water Agency Adour-Garonne, for simulations applied to cadmium and copper. The choice of each substances and sub-basins was made by mutual agreement between INERIS, the concerned Water Agencies, and the AQUAPOLE. A major selection criterion for the substances and the sub-basins was the availability of data (sources and in situ measurements). For the second study, the PEGASE model has been adapted to describe the cocaine’s behaviour (using a stable metabolite of the cocaine in the environment: the benzoylecgonine (BZE)) in waste water, waste water treatment plants (WWTP) and surface water (2). The cocaine is newly described in the model as an additional micropollutant (PEGASE already treats numerous heavy metals), thanks to the implementation of new state variable equations and their specific parameterizations. Simulations of BZE have been done in the Walloon and Flemish regions, where many measurements from the COWAT project (3) were available. The first results are showing good agreement between calculated and measured values. The ability of the model to simulate the fate of studied micropollutants (cadmium, zinc, copper, and the cocaine derivatives) in surface waters should be enhanced and extended to other substances and basins. Moreover, additional data still have to be collected and measured. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of bovine and human O26 EHEC strains by the Whole Genome PCR Scanning
Bardiau, Marjorie ULg; Ogura, Y.; Mainil, Jacques et al

Poster (2010, April)

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See detailHydrological modelling of the EU Nitrates Directive Actions Programme: new developments in the Walloon Region (Belgium)
Sohier, Catherine ULg; Dautrebande, Sylvia; Degre, Aurore ULg

Poster (2010, April)

Wallonia (Southern Region of Belgium) implemented the Nitrates Directive through a first actions plan in 2002 followed by a second action plan in 2007. It designated vulnerable zones and introduced ... [more ▼]

Wallonia (Southern Region of Belgium) implemented the Nitrates Directive through a first actions plan in 2002 followed by a second action plan in 2007. It designated vulnerable zones and introduced various mandatory practices in order to reduce the nitrate contamination risk. At the same time, the government decided to fund non mandatory practices focused on agro-environment. Some of these (like buffer strips) should also be useful in nutrient mitigation. In order to assess the global effectiveness of all the mitigation practices, we have been developing a hydrological model spatially distributed using a 1km² grid cell on the whole Region (16 900 km²). The EPICgrid model represents the root zone and the vadose zone. In Wallonia, groundwater tables are more than 30 m deep in 8% of the territory. It is therefore of major importance to fill the gap between the root zone and the groundwater bodies. It allows us to assess the nitrate transfer time and forecast the mitigation measures’ effect in time, space and amplitude. On the ground, runoff and sediment yield are modelled at the small watershed scale in order to assess buffer strips’ effect on sediment deposition and its consequences on N and P mitigation. The poster will explain the more recent results that consist in forecasting action plans’ effect until 2015 (on both surface water bodies and groundwater bodies) and modelling of the current buffer strips’ effect. [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of genetic selection on the milk fatty acid profile of spring calving dairy cows
Mc Parland, Sinead; Berry, Donagh; Coleman, J. et al

Poster (2010, April)

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See detailAtopy controlling loci in Czech and Russian populations
Gusareva, Elena ULg; Badalová, Jana; Havelková, Helena et al

Poster (2010, April)

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See detailEvaluation de la distribution d’abondance des plantes vasculaires au Parc National de la Ruvubu, Burundi.
Masharabu, T; Noret, N; Lejoly, J et al

Poster (2010, April)

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See detailLipase-assisted synthesis of potential bio-based surfactants starting from lignocellulosic carbohydrates
Richard, Gaetan ULg; Nott, Katherine ULg; Paquot, Michel ULg et al

Poster (2010, April)

Surfactants constitute an important class of compounds with a lot of applications, especially in the food and beverage industries (emulsion forming and stabilization, antiadhesive and antimicrobial ... [more ▼]

Surfactants constitute an important class of compounds with a lot of applications, especially in the food and beverage industries (emulsion forming and stabilization, antiadhesive and antimicrobial activities)1. With the prospect of synthesising new active compounds, white biotechnology offers efficient tools. Indeed, the use of enzymes as biocatalysts provides an interesting synthetic route in comparison to the chemical way that often requires high reaction temperatures and suffers from a lack of specificity, resulting in complex mixtures. Among all the biocatalysts available, lipases represent a class of industrial interest 2,3. In parallel, the starting material is also an important parameter : due to the depletion of petroleum reserves, its ever increasing price and various environmental aspects, the use of renewable or biomass resources is inevitable. Within the frame of a biorefinery project, we focused on the lipase-assisted modification of uronic acids. These carbohydrates can be obtained from lignocellulosic material, and, in the presence of fatty alcohols, the Candida antarctica lipase B catalyses the synthesis of amphiphilic compounds. Owing to the initial conditions used and the addition of co-solvents, we optimized the synthesis of these bio-based potential surfactants, and obtained a panel of various structures depending to the acyl acceptor used. The poster will present the details of these syntheses. [less ▲]

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See detailApproach of regionalization of low flow of the Walloon Region
Gailliez, Sébastien; Degre, Aurore ULg

Poster (2010, April)

The walloon part of the Meuse’s watershed represents 12283 km² and 17694 km of river. The anthropogenic pressure is important (population density is more or less 200 inhabitants/km²). In low flow period ... [more ▼]

The walloon part of the Meuse’s watershed represents 12283 km² and 17694 km of river. The anthropogenic pressure is important (population density is more or less 200 inhabitants/km²). In low flow period, water scarcity can touch both the water users (producer of drinking water and hydropower, tourism and pleasure activities and kayaking) and the river itself affecting the ‘good environmental state’ (context of Water Framework Directive 2000/60/CE). The operational management of rivers during low flow periods needs a deep knowledge of this drought phenomenon including an analysis of low flow severity and its occurrence probability. It also needs the computation of low flow discharge at any point of a river based on available hydrologic variables. The aim of this study is the low flows’ regionalization in the Walloon Region. First of all, the time series of flow data are filled in and validated. The quality is then controlled. The different tests are the determination of the minimum year requirement for a monitoring site, homogeneity tests, verification of presence or absence of summer alga and the proportion of extrapolation of the discharge rating curve Secondly, homogeneous regions will be defined and regression equations will be build. These equations will establish the relation between low flow and physical parameters (watershed area, pedology, slope), climate ones and/or ground water ones. The regression model will permit the computation of low flow discharge at any point of an ungauged river. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of climate changes impact on the hydrological behaviour of the peaty mediums - Application to the Haute Lesse-Ourthe area (Belgium).
Sohier, Catherine ULg; Dautrebande, Sylvia; Degre, Aurore ULg

Poster (2010, April)

The peaty and wet mediums have a very important role to play in term of biodiversity conservation, hydrologic pattern regulation, fauna habitat and landscape value. In the Haute Lesse – Ourthe catchments ... [more ▼]

The peaty and wet mediums have a very important role to play in term of biodiversity conservation, hydrologic pattern regulation, fauna habitat and landscape value. In the Haute Lesse – Ourthe catchments (Saint-Hubert), numbers of these mediums were strongly modified by a drainage network. This drainage network was implemented to permit a forestry production focussed on the Spruce. It has severely disturbed the hydrological cycle. The study consists in modelling the impacts of restoration practices carried out notably within the framework of the LIFE European project on the hydrological behaviour of the peat bog. Then we modelled the effect of climate change. Physical properties and retention curve of peaty materials were characterized on the basis of undisturbed samples using the Richards’apparatus. Calculations were carried out with the hydrological model EPICgrid (GxABT). The model was initially validated on several reference catchments of the study zone. It was then applied at local scale for various peaty mediums (peat type, drainage characteristics, vegetation type) and for current and future climatic conditions. A regional simulation was finally carried out in order to evaluate the impacts of peat bogs restoration measures at catchment scale. Simulations highlighted the differences in physical and hydrous properties of the different peat types (“true” peat and “degraded” peat). Local and regional impacts of peat bogs restoration on their hydrological behaviour have been evaluated. Eventually, simulations allowed us to evaluate climate change’s impact on the hydrological behaviour of the peaty mediums. The model showed notably that future climatic conditions could generate severe droughts which can become critical in some situations. [less ▲]

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See detailA pendulum test as a tool to evaluate viscous friction parameters in the equine fetlock joint
Noble, Prisca ULg; Lumay, Geoffroy ULg; Coninx, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2010, April)

This study describes an equine fetlock joint pendulum test, and investigates the influence of post mortem time and intra-articular lipid solvent on the viscous frictional response. Fresh equine digits ... [more ▼]

This study describes an equine fetlock joint pendulum test, and investigates the influence of post mortem time and intra-articular lipid solvent on the viscous frictional response. Fresh equine digits (control group 1 (n = 6); lipid solvent group 2 (n = 6)) were mounted in a pendulum tribometer. Assuming that pendular joint damping could be modelled by a harmonic oscillator fluid damping (HOFD), damping time (t), viscous damping coefficient (c ) and friction coefficient (µ) were then followed for 5 hours under experimental conditions (400 N; 20 °C). In all experiments, pendular joint damping was found to follow an exponential decay function (R² = 0.99714), which confirms that joint damping is fluid. The evolution of t, c and µ was found to be significantly (P <0.05) different in the two groups. Indeed, t decreased and c and µ increased more rapidly and strongly in the group 2. It was concluded that pendular joint damping can be modelled by an HOFD model. The influence of post mortem time on results suggests that, ideally, joint mechanical properties should only be tested on fresh cadavers at the same post mortem time. Finally, the addition of lipid solvent was found to be responsible for upper viscous friction parameters and for a reduced damping time, which suggests that articular lubricating ability was compromised. This equine pendulum test could be used to test the efficacy of various bio-lubricant treatments. [less ▲]

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See detailTRANSNATIONAL MODELING OF THE SURFACE WATER QUALITY OF THE INTERNATIONAL RIVER BASIN DISTRICT MEUSE WITH PEGASE
Deliège, Jean-François ULg; Everbecq, Etienne ULg; Grard, Aline ULg

Poster (2010, April)

The PEGASE Model has been applied at the entire International River Basin District of the Meuse. The poster presents different sub-basin applications on (i) the Chiers (Luxembourg + Belgium Walloon Region ... [more ▼]

The PEGASE Model has been applied at the entire International River Basin District of the Meuse. The poster presents different sub-basin applications on (i) the Chiers (Luxembourg + Belgium Walloon Region and French Rhin-Meuse Basin, 2000-2006) for the reference years 2000 and 2002 and prospective scenario 2015, (ii) International simulation performed (during 2005-2006) upstream (up to the Belgian border) for the reference year 2002, (iii) Current coordination between BE-Flemish Region and NL for downstream simulations of historical situation and (iv) prospective scenarios : International databases for a single reference year on the whole Meuse District [less ▲]

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See detailSeaDataNet regional climatologies: an overview
Troupin, Charles ULg; Ouberdous, Mohamed ULg; Barth, Alexander ULg et al

Poster (2010, March 29)

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See detailGODIVA: a 4-dimension implementation of DIVA
Troupin, Charles ULg; Ouberdous, Mohamed ULg; Beckers, Jean-Marie ULg

Poster (2010, March 29)

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See detailVariation in external morphology of resident bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Bahia San Antonio, Patagonia, Argentina.
Vermeulen, Els ULg; Cammareri, Alejandro

Poster (2010, March 22)

Two geographic variations of bottlenose dolphins were described in Argentina (Bastida & Rodriguez, 2003); bottlenose dolphins characterized by their triangular dorsal fin shape (coast of the province of ... [more ▼]

Two geographic variations of bottlenose dolphins were described in Argentina (Bastida & Rodriguez, 2003); bottlenose dolphins characterized by their triangular dorsal fin shape (coast of the province of Buenos Aires), and bottlenose dolphins characterized by their falcate dorsal fin shape (coast of the province of Chubut). It was stated that `their clear difference would indicate that both geographic forms are isolated¿ (Bastida & Rodriguez, 2003 p.137). A photo-identification study carried out in Bahía San Antonio (BSA), North Patagonia Argentina, showed a similar variation in external morphology among year-round resident bottlenose dolphins. Out of the 15 bottlenose dolphins considered year-round resident in the bay (Vermeulen & Cammareri, 2009), three are clearly distinguishable by a more falcate dorsal fin, a darker coloration and a notably shorter beak. These individuals, with one associated calf, were first identified in September 2008 and could be re-identified in the study area up to 13 days over all the different seasons. On all occasions, they were re-identified in close association with each other and on 10 occasions in close association with triangular dorsal fin shaped bottlenose dolphins. Behavioural observations made during these associations indicated that these mixed dolphin groups were 18% of their time feeding, 18% socialising, 17% slowly travelling and resting, 16% travelling in medium and fast speed and 7% milling (n=380 min). Although both forms show variations in external morphology, the extent to which this phenotypic variation is genetically correlated remains unknown. A clear insight on the differentiation between these regional forms might have important conservation implications for this species in Argentina. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of the crystallisation pathway of inulin on its mono-hydrate to hemi-hydrate thermal transition
Ronkart, Sébastien; Deroanne, Claude; Paquot, Michel ULg et al

Poster (2010, March 22)

Inulin plays a major role in the food industry as dietary fibre, bulking agent and fat or sugar substitute. Thermal properties of two inulins obtained from different crystallisation pathways were ... [more ▼]

Inulin plays a major role in the food industry as dietary fibre, bulking agent and fat or sugar substitute. Thermal properties of two inulins obtained from different crystallisation pathways were investigated. The first one, was obtained by fractional precipitation of a saturated inulin solution (40/120). The second one, came from a solid amorphous inulin (95/120). These two inulins were spray dried with an inlet air temperature of 120°C. Then, these powders were placed into controlled atmosphere conditions at 0 % HR during one week and at 94% during the same time. Finally the two inulins were called 40/120/94% and 95/120/94% and their thermal properties were investigated by Wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature resolved wide angle X-ray scattering (TRWAXS) and thermogravimetry (TGA).Although WAXS did not show any difference between the two inulin, thermal analysis revealed the existence of a hemi-hydratate inulin (40/120/94%). This fact has an implication on the processing of the powder at an industrial level. Indeed, 40/120/94% has shown an agglomeration whereas 95/120/94% was a continuous mass. In other words, polymorphism of inulin crystals induces technofunctionality changes of the powder (hygroscopy, solubility, etc.) which could have an impact during processing or formulation of the powder. [less ▲]

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See detailNanocoatings of inorganic surfaces by molecular biomimetic
Vreuls, Christelle ULg; Genin, Alexis ULg; Zocchi, Germaine ULg et al

Poster (2010, March 22)

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See detailRelease of cardiac biomarkers after an intense physical exercise: preliminary results
Le Goff, Caroline ULg; Laurent, Terry; Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg et al

Poster (2010, March 20)

Background: Over the past 2 decades, there has been a large interest in cardiac markers elevations, which are often seen following endurance sport events. These elevations were transient, with levels ... [more ▼]

Background: Over the past 2 decades, there has been a large interest in cardiac markers elevations, which are often seen following endurance sport events. These elevations were transient, with levels decreasing to pre-event concentrations within 24-48 hours. This might be explained by the relatively short half-life of studied markers, or water imbalance during and after the event. Therefore, the present preliminary study aimed to examine the increase in N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), highly sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hsTnT) and I (TnI II), myoglobin, creatine kinase muscle – brain (CK-MB), myeloperoxydase (MPO) and Highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) elevations after prolonged strenuous exercise . Materials and methods: Blood samples (EDTA plasma and heparinised plasma) were drawn at baseline, after 45, 90, 105, 165, 225, 285, 345, 690 and 1440 minutes in two healthy persons (29 year, trained 6 hours per week; 23 year, untrained). Each subjects runs at the maximal possibility during 2 hours. Results: For the untrained person, level of NT-proBNP exceeded the upper reference limits 12 hours after exercise but increased in all times. HsTnT and TnI II levels were upper the reference limit respectively 45 minutes and directly after exercise and increased up to 4 hours after exercise. We reported a decrease of these concentrations above the reference limits after 24 hours. Myoglobin increased after 45 minutes until 5 hours after exercises. It decreased after the 5th hour to be normalized 24 hours after exercise. CK-MB increased directly after the exercise and was upper the reference limits 165 minutes after the exercise. Level of MPO was very high just after exercise and decreased quickly in the following hours to be just upper the limit references 24 hours after exercise. HsCRP levels increased after 105 minutes and continued to increase after 24 hours. For the trained subject, we noted the same profile of increase of cardiac markers levels stayed but in the range of reference. Conclusion: These cases are extremely interesting. Indeed, this observation suggested a physiological counter regulatory process rather a simple increase of myocardial damage related to the intensity of exercise. In fact, for this moment, we do not know if the release of cardiac markers is physiological or pathological thus it must be studied. This preliminary study on endurance training suggested that intensively is determinants of the rate and the magnitude of subsequent cardiac marker release. These results suggested that an adaptation mechanism could exist. Benefits and possible long-term negative aspects of prolonged exercise should be evaluated with a more important population of athletes. [less ▲]

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See detailPostoperative sialadenitis with chronic brachial plexopathy
Reuter, Gilles; Racaru, Tudor ULg; Nguyen khac, Minh-Tuan et al

Poster (2010, March 20)

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See detailGPS™ II and GPS™ III: comparison of obtained platelets concentrations
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Le Goff, Caroline ULg; Renouf, Julien et al

Poster (2010, March 20)

Introduction: Recently, several researches, essentially in vitro, demonstrated the positive effects of platelets on healing process of different tissues: bones, muscles and tendons. The aim of this study ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Recently, several researches, essentially in vitro, demonstrated the positive effects of platelets on healing process of different tissues: bones, muscles and tendons. The aim of this study is to compare the obtained platelets concentration between the new GPS™ III and GPS™ II. Methods: Two blood samples of 52 mL were taken in 5 volunteers and transferred respectively in both GPS™ II and GPS™ III. These devices were centrifuged at 3200 RPM during 15 min. The platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was thus collected and transferred in 6 mL test tubes. Cells count was done using an analyser ABX Micros 60. Results and conclusion: Platelets concentrations were more important from 6.2 up to 9.2 times with GPS™ II and from 7.3 up to 8.3 times with GPS™ III compared to blood samples. Efficiency of the collected platelets was around 92% for GPS™ II and 96% for GPS™ III. Both techniques made it possible to collect platelets but, unfortunately, also a lot of red and white blood cells. None of these parameters showed any significant difference (p>0.05). Conflicts of interests: The 10 devices GPS™ II and GPS™ III were provided gracefully by the firm Biomet Biologics TTC. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison between platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and vascular endothelial growth factor-111 (VEGF-111) as a therapeutic tool in tendon healing process
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Drion, Pierre ULg; Libertiaux, Vincent ULg et al

Poster (2010, March 20)

Introduction In spite of the availability of various treatments for tendinopathy, this pathology often becomes chronic. For this reason, it is of interest to develop new treatments. Among them, the ... [more ▼]

Introduction In spite of the availability of various treatments for tendinopathy, this pathology often becomes chronic. For this reason, it is of interest to develop new treatments. Among them, the injection of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) seems to be a promising one. Indeed, several animal models have demonstrated that injection of blood platelets can initiate and stimulate tendon and ligament repair by releasing growth factors (GF) locally. Among all the GF released by activated platelets, the vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is known to induce positive effects on vascular function and angiogenesis, and could be implicated in the healing process of tendons. Recently, a novel VEGF-A isoform was identified, the VEGF-111, a biologically active and proteolysis-resistant VEGF-A isoform, also known to present beneficial effects on ischemic diseases. This prompted us to evaluate whether VEFF-111 would have a therapeutic interest within the framework of the tendon pathology. Aim of the study: We hypothesized that the healing of ruptured Achilles tendons, which is the last stage of the Blazina’s classification, could be improved by injection of VEGF-111 that was compared to the potential effect of PRP injections using a rat model. Methods: A 5mm defect was surgically induced in rat Achilles tendon after resection of plantaris tendon. Rats were divided into 3 groups: A: control (no injection), B: PRP treatment and C: VEGF-111 treatment. Rats received a local injection of PRP (50µL) or VEGF-111 (100ng) in situ after the surgery and were placed in their cage without immobilization. After 5, 15 and 30 days, the rats were euthanized in each group. The traumatized Achilles tendon of each rat was removed and dissected during the healing process. Immediately after sampling, tendons were submitted to a biomechanical tensile test up to rupture, using a “Cryo-jaw”. Results: Our results show that developed force necessary to induce tendon rupture during biomechanical tensile test was more important for tendons which had received an injection of PRP or VEGF-111. Moreover, the tensile force necessary to break tendons is higher with PRP than with VEGF-111. These results were already noticed from day 5 onwards. Conclusion: This experimentation has shown that both PRP and VEGF-111 injections stimulated tendon healing process as suggested by the increased force needed to break tendons during its healing process. Furthermore, this acceleration of the cicatrisation process was more significant with PRP than with VEGF-111. This could be explained by the release from platelets of a “cocktail” of growth factors acting in synergy on the healing process. Acknowledgement This experimentation was partially financed by “Standard de Liège 2007” and “Lejeune-Lechien 2008” grants. [less ▲]

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See detailMagnetic hybrid based on iron oxide nanoparticles and thermoresponsive block copolymer for biomedical applications
Sibret, Pierre ULg; Aqil, Abdelhafid; Zhao, J. et al

Poster (2010, March 18)

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See detailTargeting nanoparticles to M cells with non-peptidic ligands for oral vaccination
Freichels, Hélène ULg; Fievez, Virginie; Plapied, Laurence et al

Poster (2010, March 18)

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See detailZebrafish as model in toxicology/pharmacology.
Voncken, Audrey ULg; Piot, Amandine ULg; Stern, Olivier ULg et al

Poster (2010, March 17)

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See detailStudy of the role of miR-21 in the regulation of angiogenesis
Sabatel, Céline; Malvaux, Ludovic; Bovy, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2010, March)

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See detail16K human prolactin is an anti-lymphangiogenic factor in vitro and in vivo
Kinet, Virginie; Castermans, Karolien; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

Poster (2010, March)

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See detailHYPERINSULINISM-HYPERAMMONEMIA: AN UNUSUAL CAUSE OF HYPOKETOTIC HYPOGLYCEMIA
HARVENGT, Julie ULg; LEBRETHON, Marie-Christine ULg; leroy, patricia et al

Poster (2010, March)

BACKGROUND Etiological diagnosis of hypoglycaemia in infancy is a complex process, requiring careful integration of detailed history, clinical and laboratory data. The causes of recurrent infant ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND Etiological diagnosis of hypoglycaemia in infancy is a complex process, requiring careful integration of detailed history, clinical and laboratory data. The causes of recurrent infant hypoglycaemia include excessive insulin secretion, surreptitious insulin administration, deficiency of counter-regulatory hormones and inborn errors of metabolism. CLINICAL CASE A 10 month old girl was admitted at our emergency unit for generalized seizures without fever. Routine laboratory investigations were normal but blood glucose level was at 31 mg/dl. No ketone bodies were found in the urine. Past medical history revealed failure to thrive. A first seizure episode at 8 months of age during family’s holiday is reported. Tests performed in a foreign hospital revealed glycaemia at 36mg/dl. During her stay in our paediatric unit, several hypoglycaemias (31-45 mg/dl) were documented related to irritability as initial symptom of neuroglucopaenia. Detailed medical history revealed that fast tolerance was shorten with hypoglycaemia documented between one to three hours after eating. Clinical examination showed absence of hepatomegaly and failure to thrive: weight, -3SD; height, -2SD, and cranial circumference -2SD. At the time of hypoglycaemia, urinary tests revealed absence of ketonuria, that basically evokes hyperinsulinism or fatty acid oxidation deficiencies but these deficiencies were rapidly excluded by the very short fast state. Blood acylcarnitine profile was normal. Hyperinsulinism is defined by a ratio glycaemia/insulin below 4 with insulin values not necessary high. Since hyperinsulinism can not be excluded with only one blood measure, series of taking were performed during 24 hours. One of these tests was clearly positive with ratio equal to 2.3 (glycaemia at 41 mg/dl, insulin at 18µU/ml). For this patient, ammonemia was also tested with values ranged from 242 to 275 µg/dl (normal < 125) and the diagnosis of hyperinsulinism/hyperammoniemia (hi/ha) was made and confirmed by molecular analysis (mutation c.965G>A (p.R269H) in the GLUD1 gene). The treatment consists in this case by diazoxide and reduction of leucine intakes (< 200 mg of leucine/meal). DISCUSSION Differential diagnosis of hypoglycaemia with absence of ketonuria and absence of hepatomegaly include fatty acids β-oxidation defects, ketogenesis defects and hyperinsulinisms. Short fasting and post-prandial induced hypoglycaemia pointed to hyperinsulinism in our patient. Congenital hyperinsulinism includes KATP, glucokinase or glutamate deshydrogenase mutations. Hi/ha syndrome is due to activating mutations in the GLUD1 gene, coding for the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). Such mutations reduce the sensitivity of the enzyme to allosteric inhibition by GTP and consequently increase its sensitivity to allosteric activation by L-leucine. Hyperactivity of the GDH is responsible for over-oxidation of glutamate in β-pancreatic cells, increase of the ATP/ADP ratio and insulin release. Hyperactivity of GDH in liver is also responsible for hyperammonemia, which is usually mild and considered harmless for the brain. Nevertheless, recent studies have shown an increased epilepsy risk in cohorts of patients with hi/ha. CONCLUSION This case points out the importance of necessity for first investigations of infant documented case of hypoglycaemia. Patient history must focus on symptoms such as shorten fast tolerance periods and neurological symptoms of glucose deprivation. Blood samples should be taken at the time of hypoglycaemia and urine samples as soon as possible after the episode of hypoglycaemia. Initial normal insulin values do not allow the exclusion of the diagnosis of hyperinsulinism. [less ▲]

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See detailESR evidence of superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen generation during photosensitization of PPME in HCT-116 cells
Quoilin, Caroline ULg; Guelluy, Pierre-Henri ULg; Grammenos, Angeliki ULg et al

Poster (2010, March)

Pyropheophorbide-a methyl ester (PPME), a derivative of chlorophyll a, is a second-generation photosensitizer and is studying largely in vitro for nearly a decade on cancerous cells. It has been ... [more ▼]

Pyropheophorbide-a methyl ester (PPME), a derivative of chlorophyll a, is a second-generation photosensitizer and is studying largely in vitro for nearly a decade on cancerous cells. It has been previously established on HCT-116 (human colon carcinoma cell line) that PPME is a molecule able to create apoptotic and necrotic death (Matroule et al). The cytotoxicity of PPME is presumed to be induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the photoexcited molecule. Actually, to the best of our knowledge, no experimental evidence enables to confirm this supposition in an indubitable manner. Electron spin resonance (ESR) associated with spin trapping technique is a powerful method to detect, quantify and identify the ROS produced after photoactivation of PPME. Previous results indicate that PPME penetrates inside cells and localizes inside specific organelles (endothelial reticulum, Golgi apparatus and lysosome) (Matroule et al). The recent researches of Guelluy et al have also clearly demonstrated the presence of PPME inside mitochondrion. Consequently, ESR experiments were performed using an intracellular located spin trap, POBN (4-pyridyl 1-oxide-N-tert-butylnitrone), in order to detect in situ the ROS production. It has been shown that PPME is able to generate superoxide anions and hydroxyl radicals. Irradiation of the dye in HCT-116 cells in the presence of POBN spin trap and ethanol scavenger (2%, a non-toxic concentration) leads to the apparition of the ESR spectrum characteristics of POBN/ethoxy adduct. To assess the extent of contribution of ROS and to determine a possible reaction mechanism, competition experiments with specific quencher agents were carried out. Addition of catalase (CAT), a hydrogen peroxide quencher, or superoxide dismutase (SOD), a superoxide anion quencher, inhibits 30% of the signal. The parallel effect of SOD and CAT suggest that superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide are involved in the generation of hydroxyl radicals via a Fenton reaction. This assertion is reinforced by the 20% reduction of signal intensity when adding desferroxamine, a Fe3+ chelator also implicated in Fenton reaction. Addition of DABCO, a quencher of singlet oxygen, to cells reduces 70% of the POBN/ethoxy adduct signal intensity. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Hydrogen Electrode in Ionic Liquids: Acidity Measurements and Titrations
Robert, Thierry ULg; Malherbe, Cédric ULg; Magna, lionel et al

Poster (2010, March)

The acidity level in ILs containing acid was first determined using the Hammett acidity function (H0)1-2 in our laboratory. It was demonstrated that this attainable acidity, extending from -3 to -8, is ... [more ▼]

The acidity level in ILs containing acid was first determined using the Hammett acidity function (H0)1-2 in our laboratory. It was demonstrated that this attainable acidity, extending from -3 to -8, is exclusively depending of the nature of anion and follow the order: PF6 > BF4 > NTf2 > OTf. Nevertheless, the Hammett acidity function is an apparent function in this media and must then be corrected for. Consequently, in a second step, we tried to evaluate directly the proton activity from the determination of a potentiometric acidity function (R0) based on the extrathermodynamic Strehlow assumption.3 Therefore, the equilibrium potential of the H+/H2 couple was measured with an hydrogen electrode versus the ferricinium/ferrocene couple for which the potential is considered as independent of the solvent. [less ▲]

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See detailQuantitative Evaluation of Imputities in Ionic Liquids
Robert, Thierry ULg; Olivier-Bourbigou, Hélène; Gilbert, Bernard ULg

Poster (2010, March)

Since several years, our laboratory is studying the acidity in ionic liquids and showed that very acidic levels can be reached in these media when a strong acid is added. These acidity levels were ... [more ▼]

Since several years, our laboratory is studying the acidity in ionic liquids and showed that very acidic levels can be reached in these media when a strong acid is added. These acidity levels were determined using Hammett acidity1 (spectroscopic method) and Strehlow acidity2 (potentiometric method) measurements. Considering the attainable acidity levels, it turns out that the purity of these ionic solvents is very critical because all impurities (i.e methylimidazole, water, acetone, chloride …) can act as (strong) bases. Therefore, it is imperative to quantify these impurities to obtain reproducible results. [less ▲]

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See detailFaraday instability on a network
Delon, Giles ULg; Terwagne, Denis ULg; Adami, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2010, March)

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See detailComparing deviancy training in three groups of adolescents : qualitative and quantitative data
Mathys, Cécile ULg; Born, Michel; Shaw, Daniel

Poster (2010, March)

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See detailAn analytical method to determine the composition of cryolitic melts involved in the Hall-Heroult process by Raman spectroscopy
Malherbe, Cédric ULg; Gilbert, Bernard ULg

Poster (2010, March)

The Hall-Héroult process involves the metallic aluminium production from electroreduction of aluminium oxide in cryolitic melt (mostly composed of cryolite and aluminium fluoride) around 1000°C. In order ... [more ▼]

The Hall-Héroult process involves the metallic aluminium production from electroreduction of aluminium oxide in cryolitic melt (mostly composed of cryolite and aluminium fluoride) around 1000°C. In order to reduce the energy loss during this process, controlling the melt composition turns out to be critical. Unfortunately, no in situ analytical method allows measuring the melt composition yet. Since the Raman spectrum of the melt depends on both the cryolitic ratio (molar NaF/AlF3 ratio, CR) and the aluminium oxide content, our laboratory proposed in the past to apply Raman spectroscopy for direct melt composition determination by recording the spectrum from the top. However, experimental problems made the practical application difficult. Nowadays, the method is becoming more feasible because of new instrumental developments such as new sensitive CCD, fiber optics and new optical filters. [less ▲]

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See detailInvolvement of miR-125b in in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis
Malvaux, Ludovic; Pendeville, Hélène; Sabatel, Céline et al

Poster (2010, March)

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See detailMultifractality in quantum maps
Martin, John ULg; Garcia-Mata, Ignacio; Giraud, Olivier et al

Poster (2010, March)

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See detailAnalyse et évaluation des incidents médicamenteux au CHU de Liège
Bottari, Ludovic; Maesen, Didier ULg; Gerard, Xavier ULg et al

Poster (2010, February 27)

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See detailEnquête sur les besoins et les attentes pour la pharmacie clinique au CHU de Liège
Gerard, Xavier ULg; Lerusse, Thomas ULg; Van Hees, Thierry ULg

Poster (2010, February 27)

Résultats d'un enquête auprès des médecins et des infirmiers chef d'unité sur la perception, les besoins et les attentes à propos de la pharmacie clinique au CHU de Liège.

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See detailPoleward front of upwelling filaments generates subsurface anticyclonic eddies (FEDDY): a CAIBEX Project contribution
Sangrà, Pablo; Arístegui, Javier; Troupin, Charles ULg et al

Poster (2010, February 25)

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See detailModeling and observation of an upwelling filament off Cape Ghir (NW Africa) during the CAIBEX survey
Troupin, Charles ULg; Sangrà, Pablo; Arístegui, Javier et al

Poster (2010, February 22)

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See detailEnzymatic process development for the extraction of ferulic acid from wheat bran
Giet, Jean-Michel ULg; Roiseux, O.; Blecker, Christophe ULg

Poster (2010, February 16)

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See detailBrushes of Polymers Bearing Negatively Charged Side Groups: Mimicking Natural Molecular Velcros
Hou, W.; Fustin, C.-A; Theato, P. et al

Poster (2010, February 05)

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See detailPretreatments and enzymatic hydrolysis of Miscanthus x giganteus for oligosaccharides production: delignification degree and characterisation of the hydrolysis products
Vanderghem, Caroline ULg; Jacquet, Nicolas ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg et al

Poster (2010, February 04)

The aim of the present study is to compare two delignification methods (formic/acetic acid1 and soaking in aqueous ammonia) on Miscanthus x giganteus and to assess the suitability to produce cellobiose ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study is to compare two delignification methods (formic/acetic acid1 and soaking in aqueous ammonia) on Miscanthus x giganteus and to assess the suitability to produce cellobiose and other oligosaccharides after enzymatic hydrolysis. Oligosaccharides have recently gotten attention for their health benefits. Two methods were compared in order to quantify lignin: the acid detergent lignin method (procedure of Van Soest most commonly employed by animal scientist and agronomists for analysis of forages) and the Klason lignin procedure. Lignin concentrations in raw material determined by both methods were different; Klason lignin value (23.5%) was greater than the acid detergent lignin concentration (12.9%). Possible reasons of these results will be discussed. Pretreatment by the formic/acid mixture showed a better deliginification rate compared to the soaking in aqueous ammonia method. Results were based on Klason lignin. Analysis of the structural carbohydrates revealed that untreated miscanthus was mainly composed of glucose and xylose. Extracted pulps by both delignification methods were hydrolysed by commercial cellulases and hemicellulases. A major challenge is the characterisation of complex mixtures of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. In this study, the hydrolysis products were separated and quantified by highperformance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAECPAD). This method was successfully applied to the quantitative analysis of monosaccharides (glucose and xylose) and disaccharides (cellobiose and xylobiose) formed by the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated miscanthus. The influence of the pretreatments on the oligosaccharides yields will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailA life-cycle assessment of injectable drug primary packaging : comparing the traditional process in glass vials with the new Closed Vial technology (polymer vials)
Belboom, Sandra ULg; Renzoni, Roberto ULg; Verjans, Benoît et al

Poster (2010, February 01)

This study based on the life cycle assessment methodology compares environmental impacts of two packaging alternatives used for injectable drugs: the traditional method based on glass vials and the new ... [more ▼]

This study based on the life cycle assessment methodology compares environmental impacts of two packaging alternatives used for injectable drugs: the traditional method based on glass vials and the new method developed by Aseptic Technologies based on polymer vials. [less ▲]

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See detailLife cycle environmental performance of using substitution fuels in cement production
Belboom, Sandra ULg; Halleux, Hubert; Léonard, Angélique ULg et al

Poster (2010, February 01)

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (14 ULg)
See detailInvestigating the effect of blind hole pinning on the magnetization response of a superconductor.
Shaw, Gorky ULg; Mohan, Shyam; Sinha, Jaivardhan et al

Poster (2010, February)

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See detailTranscriptomic analysis of Arabidopsis roots during flowering
D'Aloia, Maria ULg; Tocquin, Pierre ULg; Périlleux, Claire ULg

Poster (2010, February)

Contribution of the root system to the flowering process remains poorly studied. Part of the problem resides in its difficult isolation from the substrate, especially on adult plants. Taking advantage of ... [more ▼]

Contribution of the root system to the flowering process remains poorly studied. Part of the problem resides in its difficult isolation from the substrate, especially on adult plants. Taking advantage of an hydroponic device that allows synchronous growth and flowering of Arabidopsis thaliana (Tocquin et al., 2003), we performed global transcript profiling of roots during induction of flowering by a single long day (LD). Results were validated by real-time RT-PCR, and the expression patterns of selected probes were further analyzed in shoots and roots. Some of the genes that were identified in the microarray experiment were already known to be involved in the photoperiodic pathway of flowering in Arabidopsis, and hence were activated in both roots and shoots during the LD. These genes include, for example, components of light signaling or circadian machinery (e.g. GIGANTEA). Other genes providing new insights into the control of flowering at the whole plant level will be presented. Tocquin et al., (2003). BMC Plant Biology, 3: 2. [less ▲]

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See detailAN NMR INVESTIGATION OF THE ACTINIDE IONS AND THEIR COMPLEXES
Vidick, Geoffrey ULg; Bouslimani, Nouri; Desreux, Jean-François ULg

Poster (2010, January 28)

We currently use several advanced NMR techniques in order to fully characterize actinide ions and their complexes in water or in organic solvents. The dispersion of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 of ... [more ▼]

We currently use several advanced NMR techniques in order to fully characterize actinide ions and their complexes in water or in organic solvents. The dispersion of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 of solvent nuclei with the magnetic field (NMRD) yields information on the magnetic properties and on the dynamic behavior of paramagnetic species. 17O NMR allows the measurement of the water exchange times and 1H and 13C spectra yield information on the solution structures of the complexes and on the covalency of their coordination bonds. The application of NMR in actinide science will be illustrated with studies on the U, Np, Pu and Cm ions in different oxidation states and on their complexes. For instance, Cm3+ ion is the actinide analogue of Gd3+ but is not in a pure 8S state as indicated by much lower relaxation rates and much shortened electronic relaxation rates. In keeping with EPR studies1, Cm3+ does not have a perfectly spherical distribution of its unpaired electronic spins because of a much stronger spin-orbit coupling. Moreover, the Cm3+ relaxivity originates from three different processes: a dipolar coupling between the nuclear and electronic spins, a delocalization of unpaired electronic spins into the solvent orbitals (contact interaction) and a Curie contribution. Each process gives rise to an inflection point in the NMRD curves and the contact interaction reflects the partial covalency of the coordination bonds formed by Cm3+. A contact contribution is also observed in the NMR spectra of Cm3+ complexes. The sensitivity of NMR to the exact nature of the ground state of actinide ions is also illustrated by detailed studies on the U, Np and Pu ions in different oxidation states. For instance, a comparison of the NMRD curves of the 5f2 ions U4+, NpO2+ and PuO22+ indicates that the two dioxo cations have abnormally long electronic relaxation times. However, well-resolved 1H NMR spectra of their complexes can be obtained provided the solution species are sufficiently rigid. It will be shown that NpO2+ and PuO22+ induce dipolar paramagnetic shifts from which the solution structure can be deduced. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (5 ULg)
See detailNOD2 interactome
Lecat, Aurore ULg; Di Valentin, Emmanuel ULg; Fillet, Marianne ULg et al

Poster (2010, January 28)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (12 ULg)