References of "Poster"
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See detailComposition of degumming residues from oil physical refining : valorization for food application
Pierart, Céline ULg; Cavillot, Véronique; Kervyn de Meerendré, M. et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailSIZE DISTRIBUTION OF METALLIC POWDERS : A COMPARISON OF DIGITAL IMAGING AND LASER DIFFRACTION
Gregoire, Max; Michel, Frédéric ULg; Campana, Florent et al

Poster (2007)

Automated image analysis of particles under controlled orientation (SIA) is becoming a challenging technique for laser diffraction (LD) in the field of sizing metallic particles above 5 μm. Thanks to ... [more ▼]

Automated image analysis of particles under controlled orientation (SIA) is becoming a challenging technique for laser diffraction (LD) in the field of sizing metallic particles above 5 μm. Thanks to optimal particle dispersion and fully automated microscopic imaging, it is now possible to gather individual measurements on thousands of particles within a minute. The aim of this paper is to compare results obtained with both image analysis and laser diffraction from a selection of powders (figure 1) in the range between 5 μm and 250 μm. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of cyclodextrin derivatives on bronchial epithelial cell layer permeability
Belhadj-Salem, Leila; Bosquillon, Cynthia; Delattre, Luc ULg et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailHigh resolution 16 row computed tomography examination of the canine thorax
De Busscher; Bolen, Géraldine ULg; Cavrenne et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailControlled release of drugs from an original multi-component device
Nizet, dominique; Zalfen, Alina; Collard, Laurence ULg et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailThe XMM-LSS Survey : properties and two-point angular correlations of point-like sources
Garcet, O.; Gandhi, P.; Disseau, L. et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailAlien invasive species and climate change: overview of research activities
Vanderhoeven, Sonia ULg; Saad, Layla ULg; Tiébré, Marie-Solange et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailUltrastructural organization of the nucleolus in reptiles
Lamaye, Françoise; Thiry, Marc ULg

Poster (2007)

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See detailLipase-catalyzed interesterification of butterfat with rapeseed oil: new approaches for the monitoring of the reaction.
Hanon, Emilien ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg et al

Poster (2007)

Butterfat (BF) is one main source of diet fats. However, it has been less and less well perceived due to its poor spreadability when refrigerated and cholesterol and saturated fatty acids, promoters of ... [more ▼]

Butterfat (BF) is one main source of diet fats. However, it has been less and less well perceived due to its poor spreadability when refrigerated and cholesterol and saturated fatty acids, promoters of coronary heart diseases. Thus, consumer’s demand for healthy palatable fat spreads with good development of modified butter-based spreads. One ordinary method used by manufacturers for such modifications is enzymatic interesterification of a lipase to restructure triacylglycerides (TAG), i.e. to induce the exchange of fatty acid residues amongst glycerol backbones. This leads to changes in TAG species and in physical properties of the fat, namely in solid fat content (SFC) and in melting profile. Rapeseed oil (RO) contains a large amount of oleic acid and has significant contents of linoleic and linolenic acids, i.e. a high global content of unsaturation-rich residues. Thus, EIE of BF with RO may bring nutritional improvements to the reaction product, when compared to BF alone. The EIE of BF and canola oil (a low-erucic acid RO) catalyzed by the immobilized sn-1,3 specific Rhizopus arrhizus lipase in solvent-free batch and micro-aqueous systems, was previously studied. The aim of the present study was first to assess the evolution of chemical, physical and thermal modifications occurring during solvent-free batch EIE of BF and RO, with the use of lipozyme TL IM. The evolution of TAG profiles, interesterification degree, dropping point, solid fat content and free fatty acids was monitored during the reaction, especially during the first hours. Differential scanning calorimetry was also applied to follow the formed product. Then the establishment of relations between the DP and differential scanning calorimetry data and the interesterification degree was emphasized. [less ▲]

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See detailSpatial dynamics of rRNAs within the cell nucleus
Thiry, Marc ULg; Lamaye, Françoise; Thelen, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailFeasibility of a urine-based DNA methylation assay for early detection of bladder cancer
Renard, Isabelle; Kelly, J.; Collette, Catherine et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailMulti-dectector row computed tomography of the carpal joint in dogs
Cavrenne; Bolen, Géraldine ULg; DeBusscher et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailDevelopment of urine-based DNA methylation assay for prostate cancer screening
Vener, T. I.; Derecho, C.; Varde, S. et al

Poster (2007)

Introduction: The best outcome for patients with prostate cancer (PCa) is seen for those treated at an early stage of the disease. A digital rectal examination (DRE) and the measurement of serum prostate ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The best outcome for patients with prostate cancer (PCa) is seen for those treated at an early stage of the disease. A digital rectal examination (DRE) and the measurement of serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels are the current standards for PCa early detection. However, serum PSA testing lacks both sensitivity and specificity, and core biopsies frequently fail to identify small foci of PCa. The availability of non-invasive diagnostic molecular tests that could allow for a more precise identification of malignant prostate cells in asymptomatic men would be of great clinical value to improve PCa diagnosis. Study design: 114 men scheduled to undergo a prostate biopsy were enrolled in the study. The biopsies were triggered either by an abnormally high PSA value or by suspicious findings on DRE. Patients with other known or suspected urinary malignancy were excluded from the study. Morning, post-prostate massage and post-biopsy urine samples were collected from all individuals. The main goals of this study were a) to determine if prostate massage can improve the prostate DNA quantity compared to urine collected in the morning or after biopsy, and b) to evaluate the methylation status of a gene panel in urine samples from subjects with cancer found in prostate biopsy tissue cores versus subjects without cancer. Methods: Gene promoter methylation is associated with prostate cancer and has been successfully used for the molecular detection of neoplasia in urine. We have developed real-time methylation specific PCR assays to define the methylation status of several genes. Results: Median age of the patients was 65 years (range 48-85). PCa was found in 51% of the patients. Histological diagnosis of the biopsies was compared to methylation results in urine from 102 samples (89% success rate due low DNA yields for 12 samples). The comparison between different urine sampling techniques showed that prostate massage is needed. The best results were obtained in post massage urine samples with a combination of GSTP1, p14, p16, RARβ2 and RASSF1A resulting in a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 75%. Future: A multiplex assay using the Cepheid SmartCycler™ II platform is under development. Further studies are in progress to validate the assay across multiple centers. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Aznalcóllar disaster: An in-depth PIXE study of the pirite mine spill of 1998
Calvo Del Castillo, Helena ULg; Ruvalcaba Sil, Jose Luis; Álvarez, M. A. et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailIonoluminiscencia en minerales de interés gemológico
Calvo Del Castillo, Helena ULg; Ruvalcaba Sil, Jose Luis; Millán Chagoyén, Asunción et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailRole of Sox 10 in the development of the inner ear
Bodson, M; Breuskin, I; Thelen, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailCharacterization of puff pastry margarines with and without TFA
Cavillot, V; Kervyn de Meerendré, M; Pierart, Céline ULg et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailAn unusual cell type of the auditory organ during neonatal development: the inner pillar cells
Thelen, Nicolas ULg; Breuskin, I; Malgrange, B et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailGenome comparison of B. longum NCC-2705 and B. longum CRC-002 using suppressive subtractive hybridization
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; lessard, Marie*-Helene; LaPointe, Gisele et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailUltrastructural organization of the reptilian nucleolus
Lamaye, Françoise; Thiry, Marc ULg

Poster (2007)

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See detailSox 10 is not necessary for auditory neurons survival
Breuskin, I; Bodson, M; Thelen, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailPotential of Shallow Lake Systems to Trace Environmental Changes Caused by Earthquakes
Avsar; Boes; Hubert-Ferrari et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailMajor and trace element geochemistry in a peat core from North Poland.Preliminary results
De Vleeschouwer; Fagel, Nathalie ULg; Cherbukin et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailLast two Millennia atmospheric lead and heavy metals inputs in a Belgian peat bog: regional to global Human impacts
De Vleeschouwer; Gerard; Goormaghtigh et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailCarbon dioxide in European coastal waters
Borges, Alberto ULg; Schiettecatte, L.-S.; Abril, G. et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailMetamorphosis rate of paedomorphs in a natural newt population
Denoël, Mathieu ULg; Lena, J. P.; Joly, Pierre

Poster (2007)

Facultative paedomorphis is a developmental process in which larvae opt for metamorphosis before maturity or reach sexual maturity while retaining larval traits (e.g., gills). Although metamorphosis is ... [more ▼]

Facultative paedomorphis is a developmental process in which larvae opt for metamorphosis before maturity or reach sexual maturity while retaining larval traits (e.g., gills). Although metamorphosis is not reversible, the paedomorphic state is not a dead end as branchiate adults are able to metamorphose. However, the extent of this process has never been quantified in the wild. Our aim was then to estimate switching rate by carrying out a 3-year monitoring survey of a population of Alpine newts (Triturus alpestris) inhabiting an alpine lake. The data were analysed using a multi-state capture-recapture model. While morph switching did occur in this population, it involved only 12% of the paedomorphs each year (i.e., 17% of recaptured individuals), suggesting that metamorphosis was not favoured in this population during the study period. This rate is lower than in laboratory experiments during which newts from the same population were placed in water drying conditions, but as shown previously paedomorphs can avoid metamorphosis in migrating to permanent water bodies when their pond dries out. These results are in agreement with other studies showing an advantage of a dimorphism in heterogeneous habitats. The ontogenetic pathway of wild Alpine newts is thus characterised by two forks in the developmental pathway. The first occurs during the larval stage, and the second occurs in paedomorphic adults. Such a two-level decision process may allow individuals to cope with environmental uncertainty. This may be particularly adaptive as aquatic conditions can deteriorate over time as shown by yearly changes in body condition of newts [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of CRP on neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy
Kinugasa, Yukiko; Mimura, Kazuya; Katayama, Miho et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailThe tumor-associated RCAS1 protein:a contemporary view about pre-eclampsia?
Tskitishvili, Ekaterine ULg; Mimura, Kazuya; Kinugasa, Yukiko et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailDendritic cells genetically engineered to express IL-10 induce long-lasting antigen-specific tolerance in experimental asthma
Henry, E.; Desmet, C. J.; Garzé, V. et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailSynthesis of highly dispersed Pd/SiO2 cogelled xerogel catalysts from various silylated ligands
Lambert, Stéphanie ULg; Tran, Kim Yên; Arrachart, Guilhem et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailSuccessful therapy of verrucous carcinoma by photodynamic therapy
NIKKELS, Arjen ULg; thirion, L.; QUATRESOOZ, Pascale ULg et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailHorizontal Evaluation Method for the Implementation of the Construction Products Directive (HEMICPD)
Lor, Marc; Vause, Kevin; Dinne, Karla et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailRole of coactivators SRC-1 and CARM1 in estrogen receptor-alpha and beta-dependent cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of adult female rats
Charlier, Thierry ULg; Lieblich, Stephanie E; Pawluski, Jodi L et al

Poster (2007)

Nuclear receptors such as the estrogen receptors (ER) require the presence of coactivator proteins, such as the steroid receptor coactivator (SRC-1) and coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase ... [more ▼]

Nuclear receptors such as the estrogen receptors (ER) require the presence of coactivator proteins, such as the steroid receptor coactivator (SRC-1) and coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase (CARM1) to enhance the transcription of target genes. Importantly, in vitro work suggests that ER􀀁 and ER􀀂 differ in the ability to recruit coactivators such as SRC-1. For example, SRC-1 has a strong affinity for ER􀀁 and a weaker affinity for ER􀀂. Interestingly, both ER􀀁 and ER􀀂 are individually involved in estradiol-enhanced cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of adult female rats. In addition, previous work suggests a role for CARM1 in cell proliferation and for SRC-1 in cell differentiation, therefore the present study aimed to determine whether proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus co-express the coactivators SRC-1 and CARM1. We also aimed to determine whether ER􀀁 and ER􀀂 agonists would result in altered expression of SRC-1 and CARM1 in new proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus. To investigate this, adult female rats were ovariectomized and treated with either the ER􀀁 agonist Propyl-pyrazole triol (PPT), the ER􀀂 agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN), estradiol benzoate (EB), or vehicle (CTRL). Rats were then injected with BrdU (200 mg/kg) and sacrificed 24 hours later. Preliminary data suggests that DPN, PPT and EB increase cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus compared to the vehicle-injected group. Interestingly, the number of proliferating cell expressing SRC-1 is similar in all groups, suggesting that neither of the ER agonists nor EB treatment affects the co-expression of BrdU+ cells with SRC-1. However, additional measurements are currently being done to investigate whether CARM-1 is differentially expressed in proliferating cells in the hippocampus following selective ER agonist treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationship between human tumor-associated antigen RCAS1 and gestational diabetes mellitus
Tskitishvili, Ekaterine ULg; Komoto, Yoshiko; Kinugasa, Yukiko et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailThe effect of hypothermia on neonatal stem cells
Kanagawa, Takeshi; Tomimatsu, Takuji; Mimura, Kazuya et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailEffect of aggressive encounters on plasma progesterone, corticosterone and corticosteroid binding capacity
Charlier, Thierry ULg; Hammond, Geoffrey L; Soma, Kiran K

Poster (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (1 ULg)
See detailEuroPlaNet is celebrating a very special year
Chatzchristou, E. T.; Nazé, Yaël ULg

Poster (2007)

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See detailRole of the transcription factor HNF-6 on doublecortin expression
Degueldre, Julie; Piens, Marie; Plumier, Jean-Christophe ULg

Poster (2007)

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See detailThe Grolier Codex: A PIXE & RBS study of the possible Maya document
Calvo Del Castillo, Helena ULg; Ruvalcaba Sil, Jose Luis; Calderón, Tomás et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailThe Dusty Young Universe
Meisenheimer, K.; Dannerbauer, H.; Klaas, U. et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailMG-63 Osteoblast Culture on Biodegradable Textiles for Bone Tissue Regeneration
Moniotte, Nicolas; Borget, Pascal; Pirotte, Fabrice et al

Poster (2007)

The primary aim of bone scaffold is to restore, maintain and improve the structure and properties of damaged bones. The scaffold acts as a 3-D template for guided tissue-engineering and provides an ... [more ▼]

The primary aim of bone scaffold is to restore, maintain and improve the structure and properties of damaged bones. The scaffold acts as a 3-D template for guided tissue-engineering and provides an excellent transition from in vitro to in vivo systems, avoiding auto- or allo-grafting treatments, both associated with serious limitations. The pore size of the scaffold must be large enough to allow cell migration and proliferation through the structure, but small enough to provide sufficient specific area for cell attachment. In this work, degradable poly(lactic acid) (PLA) yarns were knitted into complexes superstructures and evaluated as 3-D scaffold to promote cell bone reconstruction. PLA fabrics were knitted from multi-filaments in a double layer interlock structure to produce a weft knit. The fabrics are made of two porosities, one defined by the open space inside a loop (~1mm) and the second by the distance between the filaments (1-10 µm), with high control and reproducibility inherent to the manufacturing process. Human MG-63 osteoblast-like cells were seeded on PLA textiles and cell viability and proliferation were evaluated using MTS (tetrazolium salt) assays, DNA quantitative analysis (hoechst), fluorescence staining (acridine orange) and scanning electron microscopy. Alkaline Phosphatase activity in cell lysates was also investigated. After 3 days of culture, MG-63 fully expressed their fibroblastic phenotype. Although the number of cells was high, mitochondrial activity was shown to be reduced when cells are on the PLA fibres (compared to culture on a glass slide). This may be due the release of lactic acid by slow hydrolysis of PLA ester-bonds. Only a small population of cells was dead. Furthermore, it could be due to cells in a less active phase, such as cells entering the G0 phase, or in a maturing phase. From 6 to 12 days, the number of cell inside the PLA fabrics increased and typical fibroblastic morphology was maintained. Cells were mainly observed in the spaces between fibres. After 24 days of culture, MG-63 colonization is covering all the PLA knit. Small granular structures are present on the cell surface and low ALP concentration is detected, indicating the beginning of the differentiation process, rather than a toxic effect of PLA hydrolysis. This work shows that knitted PLA fabrics, seeded with autogeneous osteoblast cells can potentially be used as tissue-engineered implants for the treatment of bone defects. [less ▲]

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See detailStrained Si-on-insulator for advanced CMOS devices
Mantl, S.; Buca, D.; Zhao, Q. et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailMechanisms of ATM regulation by TGF-beta
Paupert, Jenny ULg; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary-Helen

Poster (2007)

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See detailDirecting the lipopeptide Mycosubtilin biosynthesis toward C17:0 branched isoform influences the expression of cspB and cspC in Bacillus subtilis
Guez, Jean-Sébastien; Drucbert, A.; Müller, C. et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailObservations of comet McNaught from La Silla
Snodgrass, C.; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg; Fitzsimmons, A. et al

Poster (2007)

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See detailL'assiette du Belge en chiffres
Duquesne, Brigitte ULg

Poster (2007)

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See detailPeculiar hydrophobic properties of the 67-78 fragment of α-synuclein are responsible for membrane destabilization and neurotoxicity
Crowet, Jean-Marc ULg; Lins, Laurence ULg; Dupiereux-Fettweis, Ingrid ULg et al

Poster (2006, December 18)

α-synuclein is a 140 residue protein linked to Parkinson’s disease. Intraneural inclusions called Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites are mainly composed of α-synuclein aggregated in amyloid fibrils. Few years ... [more ▼]

α-synuclein is a 140 residue protein linked to Parkinson’s disease. Intraneural inclusions called Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites are mainly composed of α-synuclein aggregated in amyloid fibrils. Few years ago, tilted peptides have been detected in two other amyloidogenic proteins : the amyloid β peptide involved in Alzheimer’s disease, and the PrP protein linked to Creuztfeldt-Jakob’s disease. Tilted peptides are short protein fragments that adopt an oblique orientation when inserted into biological membranes. Tilted peptides are able to destabilize membranes. In this study, we predicted by sequence analysis and molecular modelling that the 67-78 fragment of α-synuclein is a tilted peptide. Like most of them, the α-syn 67-78 peptide is able to induce lipid mixing and leakage of unilamellar liposomes. A mutant designed by molecular modelling to decrease the destabilizing properties of the peptide was shown to be significantly less fusogenic. The neuronal toxicity was studied using human neuroblastoma cells and we demonstrated that the α-syn 67-78 peptide induces neurotoxicity. In conclusion, we have identified a tilted peptide in α-synuclein which could be involved in the toxicity induced during amyloidogenesis of α-synuclein. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular cloning and functional expression of a new aphid isoprenyl diphosphate synthase
Vandermoten, Sophie ULg; Beliveau, Catherine; Sen, Stephanie et al

Poster (2006, December 18)

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See detailSCREENING OF SLEEP APNEAS AND HYPOPNEAS THROUGH THE AUTOMATIC ANALYSIS OF MIDSAGITTAL JAW MOTION
Senny, Frédéric ULg; Destiné, Jacques ULg; POIRRIER, Robert ULg

Poster (2006, December 07)

This paper proposes a novel method for the scoring of sleep apneas and hypopneas (SAHs) based on the recording and the analysis of the midsagittal jaw movements. Continuous wavelet transform was used to ... [more ▼]

This paper proposes a novel method for the scoring of sleep apneas and hypopneas (SAHs) based on the recording and the analysis of the midsagittal jaw movements. Continuous wavelet transform was used to delineate events which were likely to contain the SAHs, while hidden markov models (HMMs) classified events. Considering 28 recordings from which awakenings were discarded, the method detected SAHs with a sensitivity and a specificity of 82.2% and 78.3% respectively. Obstructive, central and mixed respiratory events were distinguished fairly accurately. The jaw motion is hence a reliable marker of respiratory efforts and may suffice by itself to score SAHs. [less ▲]

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See detailImportancia de la elección de distintos oligonucleótidos para el diagnostico de BLV por PCR en productos de origen bovino
Trono, K.; Gutiérrez, G.; Rodriguez, Sabrina ULg et al

Poster (2006, December 05)

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See detailMicro-macro mechanical modeling of bone-implant interface by means of the homogenization theory
Amor, Nadia; Van Cleynenbreugel, Tim; Geris, Liesbet ULg et al

Poster (2006, December)

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See detailInferring Groups of Correlated Failures
Lepropre, Jean; Leduc, Guy ULg

Poster (2006, December)

We compare and evaluate different methods to infer groups of correlated failures. These methods try to group failure events occurring nearly simultaneously in clusters. Indeed if several failures occur ... [more ▼]

We compare and evaluate different methods to infer groups of correlated failures. These methods try to group failure events occurring nearly simultaneously in clusters. Indeed if several failures occur nearly at the same moment in a network, it is possible that these failures have the same root cause. The input data of our algorithms are IP failure notifications that can be provided by several sources. We consider two sources: IS-IS Link State Packets (LSPs) and Syslog messages. Our first results on the Abilene and GÉANT networks show that the inference methods behave differently and that using IS-IS LSPs provides more accurate results than using Syslog messages. [less ▲]

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See detailMapping of the bovine growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) and polymorphism study in cattle
Colinet, Frédéric ULg; Eggen, André; Gengler, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2006, December)

A third control pathway of the Growth Hormone (GH) secretion has come into picture since the development of synthetic compounds known as Growth Hormone Secretagogues (GHSs). The GHS Receptor (GHS-R) and ... [more ▼]

A third control pathway of the Growth Hormone (GH) secretion has come into picture since the development of synthetic compounds known as Growth Hormone Secretagogues (GHSs). The GHS Receptor (GHS-R) and its subtype are abundantly located in the hypothalamus-pituitary unit, but are also distributed in other central areas and peripheral tissues. The GHS-R belongs to the G-protein coupled receptor family with seven transmembrane domain architecture. In order to determine the GHS-R gene sequence, total mRNA was extracted from abomasum and two types of GHS-R cDNA were identified. These two types are transcript variants (1a and 1b) of the same GHS-R gene. The gene encompasses two exons and a single intron. Using a 3000 Rad hybrid panel, the GHS-R gene was mapped to Bos taurus autosome 1 (BTA 1). This localization on BTA 1 agrees totally with comparative data between cattle and human since BTA 1 corresponds to part of human chromosome 3 where human GHSR is also mapped. By two-point analysis, most significantly linked marker are BL26 and BMS4031 (both LOD score : 5,66). Some studies detected different QTLs near these markers like for growth rate, carcass yield, milk portein and milk yield. In the cattle industry, it is of economical importance to increase plasma GH secretion because it is associated with faster growth, less fat stores and improved milk production. Being of economical importance and the detected QTLs near the GHS-R gene, it would be interesting to study the polymorphism on the bovine GHS-R gene. Screening for polymorphisms in the two exons on ten Belgian Blue bulls, ten Holsteins bulls and ten Limousin bulls revealed a total of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): three SNPs are in the first exon and one SNP in the second exon. In order to evaluate if GHS-R could be involved in genetic variation for growth rate, carcass yield, milk portein and milk yield, an association study between SNPs on GHS-R gene and these traits could be performed in a major cattle population. [less ▲]

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See detailA comparative study of O2 measurements in experimental (Interice II) and natural (ISPOL, Western Weddell Sea, Antarctica) first-year sea ice
Tison, Jean-Louis; Mock, T.; Thomas, David et al

Poster (2006, December)

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See detailEnCOrE : Encyclopédie de Chimie Organique Electronique
Colaux, Catherine ULg; krief, Alain

Poster (2006, December)

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See detailBuilding EnCOrE : Encyclopédie de Chimie Organique Electronique
Colaux, Catherine ULg; Seleck, Caroline; Henry, Julie et al

Poster (2006, December)

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See detailOn the understanding of the physical changes in inulin powder as a function of water activity.
Ronkart, Sébastien; Paquot, Michel ULg; Goffin, Dorothée ULg et al

Poster (2006, December)

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See detailInfluence de la variété de blé tendre sur les caractéristiques physico-chimiques et les propriétés techno-fonctionnelles de l'amidon
Massaux, Carine; Lenartz, Jonathan; Bodson, Bernard ULg et al

Poster (2006, November 20)

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See detailNew developments in benzopyran derivatives as pancreatic β-cell KATP channel openers
Florence, X.; De Tullio, Pascal ULg; Lebrun, P. et al

Poster (2006, November 18)

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See detailPharmacological evaluation of TP receptor antagonists by differential activity on alpha and beta isoforms
Hanson, Julien ULg; Dogne, J. M.; Ghiotto, J. et al

Poster (2006, November 18)

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See detailUso del Inmunoblot como método diagnóstico confirmatorio de la Anemia Infecciosa Equina
Álvarez, I.; Vissani, A.; Gutiérrez, G. et al

Poster (2006, November 12)

USO DEL INMUNOBLOT COMO MÉTODO DIAGNÓSTICO CONFIRMATORIO DE LA ANEMIA INFECCIOSA EQUINA Immunoblotting as confirmatory diagnostic assay for Equine Infectious Anemia Alvarez Irene 1 ialvarez@cicv.inta.gov ... [more ▼]

USO DEL INMUNOBLOT COMO MÉTODO DIAGNÓSTICO CONFIRMATORIO DE LA ANEMIA INFECCIOSA EQUINA Immunoblotting as confirmatory diagnostic assay for Equine Infectious Anemia Alvarez Irene 1 ialvarez@cicv.inta.gov.ar , Vissani Aldana1, Gutierrez Gerónimo1, Rodríguez Sabrina 1, Barrandeguy María 1 y Trono Karina 1. 1Instituto de Virología – CICVyA – INTA . Las Cabañas y Los Reseros s/n. 1712. Castelar Argentina. INTRODUCCION Y OBJETIVO. La prueba de diagnóstico “Gold Standard” para la Anemia Infecciosa Equina (AIE) continúa siendo la Inmunodifusión en gel de agar (IDGA), y aunque existen ensayos de ELISA comerciales, la mayoría de los diagnósticos se realizan en la actualidad por IDGA. En ciertas ocasiones no se puede declarar el estado serológico del animal debido a la presencia de reacciones inespecíficas que no permiten obtener un resultado concluyente por IDGA o se ha obtenido una respuesta diferente cuando se analizó la misma muestra de suero por IDGA y ELISA. Con el objetivo de contar con un método de diagnóstico que permita confirmar y calificar correctamente el estado serológico referido a la AIE, se evaluó en este trabajo un ensayo de Inmunoblot diseñado en nuestro laboratorio, que utiliza como antígeno proteína viral p26 recombinante (Inmunoblot-rp26). MATERIAL Y METODO. Un panel de sueros equinos evaluado previamente por IDGA (DyaSystems EIA-AGID test kit, Idexx Laboratorios) fue analizado por Inmunoblot-rp26 utilizando proteína recombinante p26 purificada fijada a membrana de PVDF. El panel incluyó: 74 sueros de campo positivos, 95 sueros de campo negativos, 63 sueros de campo inespecíficos, 26 sueros de equinos con anticuerpos frente a otras enfermedades infecciosas y 8 con alto grado de hemólisis. Además, se evaluaron para obtener un estándar de comparación, 5 paneles de proficiencia de 12 sueros cada uno otorgados por SENASA, 1 panel de proficiencia de 20 sueros otorgado por NVSL-USA y el suero positivo débil de referencia de la OIE para Anemia Infecciosa Equina. RESULTADOS. Los resultados obtenidos con el Inmunoblot-rp26 fueron comparados con los resultados del IDGA. Los resultados discordantes fueron analizados por Inmunoblot utilizando como antígeno la proteína de fusión en la región amino-terminal de p26 (inmunoblot-pBad). Todos los sueros positivos de campo fueron detectados como positivos por Inmunoblot-p26. De un total de 95 sueros negativos por IDGA, 6 fueron declarados como positivos por Inmunoblot-p26 y su estado confirmado por Inmunoblot-pBAD. Hubo concordancia total de resultados entre Inmunoblot-rp26 e IDGA con los paneles de proficiencia provenientes de SENASA y del NVSL. El suero de referencia de la OIE reaccionó con resultado claramente positivo, a diferencia de lo que sucede con IDGA, donde reacciona como débil positivo. Ninguno de los sueros con anticuerpos frente a otras enfermedades infecciosas, como tampoco los sueros bemolizados, presentaron reacción positiva por Inmunoblot-p26. Se obtuvo un claro resultado diagnóstico al analizar los sueros declarados “inespecíficos” por IDGA, entre los cuales se pudieron observar resultados negativos y positivos. CONCLUSION. El Inmunoblot con proteína p26 recombinante se comportó como una herramienta valiosa para el diagnostico confirmatorio de la anemia infecciosa equina. [less ▲]

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