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See detailTHE NORMAL ANATOMICAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE FOAL FOOT DESCRIBED WITH MULTI DETECTOR COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY (MDCT)
Van Thielen, B.; Murray, R.; Van Dooren, J. P. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailRedistribution of fibrillarin following treatment of human bladder carcinoma cells with aptatone
Jamison, James; Gilloteaux, Jacques; Perlaky, L et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailMonitoring endocrine profiles for prediction of stillbirth in Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle
Szenci, O.; Bajcsy, A. C.; Bryd, E. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailL'organométallique au service des extraits naturels
Ramdani, R.; Ghazi, Z.; Fadel, O. et al

Poster (2010)

Le Maroc est considéré parmi les pays méditerranéens les plus riches en ressources naturelles, notamment, les plantes aromatiques et médicinales. La valorisation des extraits naturels passe soit par des ... [more ▼]

Le Maroc est considéré parmi les pays méditerranéens les plus riches en ressources naturelles, notamment, les plantes aromatiques et médicinales. La valorisation des extraits naturels passe soit par des échantillons à l’état brut, soit en les transformant en d’autres structures chimiques nouvelles. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of tree species on the distribution of alkaliextractable Si in a Cambisol
Cornelis, Jean-Thomas ULg; Ranger, Jacques; Delvaux, Bruno

Poster (2010)

Abstract : In terrestrial ecosystems, silicon (Si) uptake by higher plants induces biogenic silica (BSi) deposits in leaves, which contribute to the amorphous silica (ASi) pool in soil through litter-fall ... [more ▼]

Abstract : In terrestrial ecosystems, silicon (Si) uptake by higher plants induces biogenic silica (BSi) deposits in leaves, which contribute to the amorphous silica (ASi) pool in soil through litter-fall. In forests, the ASi pool, including BSi, is ubiquitous and a substantial component of soils, which might influence the Si mass-balance at watershed scale. Here, we examined the distribution of ASi pool, estimated by alkaline dissolution (alkali-extractable Si), in an acid brown soil under three common European tree species in identical soil and climate conditions in order (i) to study how the Si recycling by tree species impacts the ASi pool in soil, and (ii) to identify the different constituents of the alkali-extractable Si pool in soil. We therefore quantified the ASi concentration with alkaline extraction (Na2CO3, 0.1M), the Si adsorbed onto poorly crystalline Fe oxides by oxalate extraction and the “plant-available Si” by CaCl2 extraction. In humus layer, the alkali-extractable Si concentration (mg SiO2 g-1) significantly decreases in the sequence: Douglas fir (14.5±0.65) > European beech (11.8±0.30) > Black pine (5.4±0.31). Below 15 cm soil depth, the alkali-extractable Si concentration is not significantly different between tree species. For each tree species, the alkali-extractable Si concentration in soil decreases from the humus layer to 15 cm depth and then slightly increases from 15 to 75 cm depth. Our data clearly show that tree species can impact the ASi content in topsoil (humus layer - 15 cm) through different Si uptake rates. Indeed, various Si recycling by forest vegetation imply different rates of BSi accumulation in leaves and then, different rates of BSi restitution on topsoil. In mineral layers, pedogenic processes play an important role in the ASi distribution given the alkali-extractable Si pool is mostly influenced by BSi dissolution, stable BSi preservation/translocation and secondarily by Si adsorption onto active amorphous Fe oxide surface. [less ▲]

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See detailAutomatic stimulus-induced medial premotor cortex activation without perception or action
D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Garraux, Gaëtan ULg

Poster (2010)

Evidence from functional imaging studies suggests that well-established stimulus-action associations may induce an automatic activation of the motor preparation system even when there is no intention to ... [more ▼]

Evidence from functional imaging studies suggests that well-established stimulus-action associations may induce an automatic activation of the motor preparation system even when there is no intention to make the associated movement (Grezes & Decety, 2002). Here we investigated whether this automatic motor activation can also be elicited by visual stimuli that are not consciously perceived. However, previous subliminal masked experiments used supraliminal response-target in such a way that unconscious mechanisms were inferred from the accumulation of the effect of the subliminal masked stimulus and the motor response. Here, to investigate neural correlates of unconscious process induced by subliminal stimuli, we used event-related BOLD fMRI at 3T to record brain activity in 24 healthy volunteers (mean age: 21 ± 2 years) as they performed a subliminal priming task (see Eimer & Schlaghecken, 1998). In this visuomotor task, participants were asked to make speeded button presses with the left or right hand following double leftward (<< <<) or rightward (>> >>) pointing arrows, which were preceded by a masked subliminal prime of 17 ms (compatible/incompatible arrows or neutral stimulus). Reaction time analysis revealed the classical positive compatibility effect (PCE), mainly shorter reaction times for compatible (mean RT: 369±38 ms) than for incompatible (mean RT: 383± 30 ms) in comparison to neutral trials (mean RT: 375± 38 ms). In a prime identification task, subjects’ performance was at chance level for primes presented for 17 ms, suggesting that the prime was not consciously perceived in the main experiment. Theses behavioral results suggest an automatic and unconscious motor activation induced by the prime. The responded stimuli were randomly intermixed with non-responded stimuli (0 0) with the assumption that the subliminal arrow prime also elicited an automatic motor activation in these passive trials as in responded trials. Imaging analysis of these non-responded trials showed first that activation was mainly restricted to posterior brain areas when using a subliminal stimulus that has not been previously associated with a motor response. Second, when the subliminal stimulus has been strongly associated with a motor response, this activation extended to rostral brain regions classically involved in motor preparation as the SMA, the premotor cortex and the striatum (cluster level p< 0.05 corrected). This finding corroborates the involvement of a fronto-striatal network, especially of the SMA in automatic and unconscious motor activation. [less ▲]

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See detailMorphological and histological studies of sheep’s brain
Salouci, Moustafa ULg; Engelen, Virginie; Jacqmot, Olivier ULg et al

Poster (2010)

Introduction: The study of normal structures of the sheep’s brain is very important to understand pathological changes caused by the bluetongue virus in the fetus’s brain at various stages of the ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The study of normal structures of the sheep’s brain is very important to understand pathological changes caused by the bluetongue virus in the fetus’s brain at various stages of the gestation. Bluetongue is an arthropod-borne viral disease of domestic and wild ruminants. The serotype 8 is responsible for outbreaks in Northern Europe in 2006. This virus causes lesions in the brain of fetuses as hydrancephaly and porencephaly. The aim of this work is to improve knowledge of anatomy and histology of the central nervous system of the sheep. Methods: Seven heads of adult sheep and one from a fetus aged 4,5 months were used. All heads were first opened in the frontal area using bone’s saw and immerged in a formalin solution for 10 days. After a good fixation, the brains were extracted and sectioned. Transversal, frontal and sagittal sections were realized. The sections of two brains were stained with Berlin-blue and treated to be embedded in methylmetacrylate for gross morphology. The different parts of the 6 resting brains were then embedded in paraffin, cut and the histological sections were stained with haematoxylin/eosin, cresyl violet or by use of silver impregnation. Results: Gross morphological examination of the brains embedded in methylmetacrylate showed the detailed anatomy of the different parts. The staining with haematoxylin/eosin permitted to differentiate the grey matter, the different nucleus and the layers of cerebral and cerebellum cortex. The cresyl violet technique permitted to visualize the Nissl bodies and the silver impregnation revealed nerve fibers. In the fetus brain, blood vessels were very numerous in the brainstem, the cerebellum and the cerebrum. The grey matter was less organized and looser. Conclusion: This work establishes an anatomical and histological approach allowing future studies in ovine fetuses with and without brain lesions potentially caused by the bluetongue virus. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of methionine sources in interaction with dietary protein content on performance and oxidative status of broiler chickens
Swennen, Q.; Buyse, Johan; Mercier, Yves et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailMacaronesia: a source of hidden genetic diversity for post-glacial recolonization of western Europe in the leafy liverwort Radula lindenbergiana.
Laenen, Benjamin ULg; Desamore, Aurélie ULg; Devos, Nicolas et al

Poster (2010)

Aim Bryophytes exhibit the lowest rates of endemism among biota in Macaronesia and differ in diversity patterns from angiosperms by the widespread occurrence of endemics within and among archipelagos. In ... [more ▼]

Aim Bryophytes exhibit the lowest rates of endemism among biota in Macaronesia and differ in diversity patterns from angiosperms by the widespread occurrence of endemics within and among archipelagos. In this study, we test the hypothesis that high dispersal ability erodes phylogeographic signal and hampers the chances of diversification in bryophytes using the leafy liverwort Radula lindenbergiana as a model. Location Macaronesia, Europe, South Africa Methods 84 samples were collected across the species distribution range and sequenced at four cpDNA loci (atpB-rbcL, trnG, trnL, and rps4). Phylogenetic reconstructions and Bayesian ancestral area reconstructions were used in combination with population genetic statistics (H, Nst, Fst) to describe the pattern of present genetic diversity in R. lindenbergiana and infer its biogeographic history. Results The two regions with the highest haplotypic diversity are Madeira and the Canary Islands. Ancestral area reconstructions suggest that Macaronesia was colonized at least twice independently and that the haplotypes currently found in Western Europe share a Macaronesian common ancestor. Whilst analysis of molecular variance and Nst statistics indicate that present-day patterns of genetic variation have a globally significant biogeographic component, Fst values among Macaronesian archipelagos, North Africa, and the Iberian Peninsula, were not significant. Main conclusions The apparent lack of speciation amongst Macaronesian bryophytes hides actual patterns of diversification at the molecular level. The occurrence of Canarian endemic haplotypes across several islands, along with the non-significant Fst and Nst among islands, North Africa and the Iberian Peninsula, suggest intense dispersal. The occurrence of endemic haplotypes suggests, however, that dispersal does not completely prevent diversification. The high diversity found among Macaronesian haplotypes, together with the Macaronesian origin of all the haplotypes found in Western Europe, suggests that Macaronesian archipelagos could have served as a refugium during the Quaternary glaciations and as a source for re-colonization of Europe. [less ▲]

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See detailA STUDY OF THE CORRELATION BETWEEN MACROTEXTURE AND THE TIRE/PAVEMENT CLOSE PROXIMITY NOISE
Luong, Jeanne ULg; Bueno, M.; Teran, F. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailFirst nationwide survey on cardiovascular risk factors in Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg (ORISCAV-LUX)
Alkerwi, A; Sauvageot, N; Donneau, Anne-Françoise ULg et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailWeignhing risk factors associated with bee colony collapse disorder by classification and regression tree analysis
Vanengelsdorp, D.; Speybroeck, N.; Evans, J. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailDesign, implementation, and test of a digitally-controlled electrical power supply for the OUFTI-1 nanosatellite
Kolodziej, Marie; Ledent, Philippe; Thirion, Pierre et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailMaillage 3D par imagerie RMN d’un grain de maïs et modélisation des transferts de chaleur et de masse durant son séchage
Janas, Sébastien ULg; Boutry, Sébastien; Vander Elst, Luce et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailIncreased mitosis in the bleached gastrodermis of the sea anemone A. pallida
Fransolet, David ULg; Roberty, Stéphane ULg; Plumier, Jean-Christophe ULg

Poster (2010)

Today, coral bleaching represents a major concern for marine biologists, especially considering the upsurge of this phenomenon possibly linked to climate change. Bleached corals, deprived of most of their ... [more ▼]

Today, coral bleaching represents a major concern for marine biologists, especially considering the upsurge of this phenomenon possibly linked to climate change. Bleached corals, deprived of most of their energy incomes, may show a partial or total mortality, which ultimately lead to shifts in reef communities. Studies focusing on cellular bleaching mechanisms have shown different ways by which algae may be expelled from gastrodermal host cells. Among those mechanisms, major emphasis has been put on host cell death, most probably due to both apoptosis and necrosis. Recovering gastrodermis is then expected to undergo regeneration process in order to be reinfected by new algae. We describe here this regeneration process in the bleached sea anemone model A. pallida. [less ▲]

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See detailPhotoacclimation responses of a symbiotic sea anemone reveal an important host cellular plasticity
Roberty, Stéphane ULg; Fransolet, David ULg; Ladrière, Ophélie ULg et al

Poster (2010)

The high productivity of coral reef ecosystems is largely attributed to the mutualistic symbiosis between reef-building corals and their intracellular dinoflagellate in the genus Symbiodinium commonly ... [more ▼]

The high productivity of coral reef ecosystems is largely attributed to the mutualistic symbiosis between reef-building corals and their intracellular dinoflagellate in the genus Symbiodinium commonly referred to as zooxanthellae. These photosynthetic algae translocate a majority of their photosynthetically fixed carbon to the host and contribute to their metabolic needs and the calcification process. <i>Symbiodinium</i> must maintain a balance between the energy derived from the light reactions in the chloroplast and the amount of energy used during dark reactions and other metabolic processes. Nevertheless, in the natural environment the holobiont have to cope with daily and seasonal changes in light intensity, upsetting that balance and creating a stress that induces a physiological response (photoacclimation) to optimize growth rates. After a ten day exposition to high and very low light intensity, morphological and photophysiological analysis conducted on the symbiotic sea anemone, Anemonia manjano, reveal significant modifications of the host tissues ultrastructure and the Symbiodinium metabolic processes (photosynthesis, respiration). Those results highlight particularly important gastrodermal and ectodermal plasticity in which symbiotic cnidarians acclimate to the Symbiodinium physiological status (mainly photosynthesis) by varying the density of particular cellular types (e.g.: cnidocytes, gastrodermal cells) contained in their tissues. [less ▲]

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See detailExperience feed back committee and evaluation of weaknesses and critical
DELGAUDINE, Marie ULg; LENAERTS, Eric ULg; COUCKE, Philippe ULg

Poster (2010)

Radiotherapy is a powerful continuously evolving effective treatment tool. Our aim is to offer the best treatments and assure security for patients and personnel. A proactive quality approach copied from ... [more ▼]

Radiotherapy is a powerful continuously evolving effective treatment tool. Our aim is to offer the best treatments and assure security for patients and personnel. A proactive quality approach copied from the one implemented in the air transport industry has been established in our department. An Experience Feed Back Committee (EFBC) has been set up to identify, record and analyze systematically all reported precursor events. Our final objective is to test and strengthen the security of the organization and the quality of care for patients. [less ▲]

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See detailSYMBIODINIUM SP. CAN STAY ALIVE THROUGH THE GUT AND IN THE FAECES OF CNIDARIA. PREDATORS. THE CASE OF CORALLIOPHILLA MEYENDORFFI AND ANEMONIA VIRIDIS.
Poulicek, Mathieu ULg; Roberty, Stéphane ULg; Plaza, Sylvain et al

Poster (2010)

The gastropod Coralliophilla meyendorffi is a common predator of the zooxanthellate anemone Anemonia viridis. Zooxanthella from the anemones are an important constitutent of the mollusc faeces. Cell ... [more ▼]

The gastropod Coralliophilla meyendorffi is a common predator of the zooxanthellate anemone Anemonia viridis. Zooxanthella from the anemones are an important constitutent of the mollusc faeces. Cell integrity, occurence of flagellated forms, live/dead proportions and mitotic index of Symbiodinium collected from the faeces and cultivated in vitro were examined and compared to that of algae in hospite. The results show that most algae withstand digestive processes of the predator, staying alive and dividing actively in the faeces. Motile (lagellated) algae arise from dividing cells and escape the fecal pellets. Impact on coral bleaching recovery is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailGeneration of all Symmetric and all Total Angular Momentum Eigenstates in Remote Qubits
Maser, A.; Schilling, U.; Bastin, Thierry ULg et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailA study of the distant activity of comet C/2006 W3 (Christensen) using Herschel and ground-based radio telescopes
Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Hartogh, P.; Crovisier, J. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailThe Chandra Carina Complex Project: massive stars
Gagné, M.; Fehon, G.; Dickerson, K. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailModeling of the longitudinal modulation of the Io interaction
Hess, S.; Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Delamere, P. A. et al

Poster (2010)

The Io interaction with the Jovian magnetosphere is the best known case of moon-magnetosphere interaction. It leads to bright emissions from radio to UV, which are mostly due to the acceleration of ... [more ▼]

The Io interaction with the Jovian magnetosphere is the best known case of moon-magnetosphere interaction. It leads to bright emissions from radio to UV, which are mostly due to the acceleration of electrons by Alfvén waves along the magnetic field lines passing Io. We previously presented a model of the electron acceleration by the Iogenic Alfvén waves, which explains the average brightness of the emissions. We now present a study of the modulation of the Io-magnetosphere interaction with longitude, and compare our results with the observed brightness modulation of the auroral emissions. This study highlights how the satellite-magnetosphere interactions depend on the variation of the magnetic field, the equatorial plasma density,... A new model of the Jovian internal magnetic field, giving an accurate description of the longitudinal modulations of the Jovian magnetic field has been computed for this study, and is also presented. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro safety assessment of inhaled products using respiratory epithelial cells
Forbes, Ben; Cao Minh, Quin An; Evrard, Brigitte ULg et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailModeling Microbial Cross-contamination in Quick Service Restaurants by Means of Experimental Simulations With Bacillus Spores
Baptista Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia ULg; Crevecoeur, Sébastien ULg; Dure, Remi et al

Poster (2010)

Cross contamination has been frequently mentioned as being in the origin of a wide range of food borne outbreaks. Handling of food is one of the ways through which cross contamination may occur. For many ... [more ▼]

Cross contamination has been frequently mentioned as being in the origin of a wide range of food borne outbreaks. Handling of food is one of the ways through which cross contamination may occur. For many different reasons, quick service restaurants are particularly at risk. Due to its importance, cross contamination via the hands should be taken into consideration when carrying out a quantitative risk assessment. The main goal of this study was to determine transfer rates of bacteria to and via the hands, reduction rates of two hand sanitizing procedures and to apply the results to a quantitative microbial risk assessment model. According to our results, handling of a portion of raw minced meat contaminated at 4.104 cfu leads to the presence of 24 cfu on both hands, 3 cfu on ready-to-eat product (RTE) manipulated with unwashed hands, 1 cfu on RTE manipulated with wiped hands and absence on RTE manipulated with washed hands. This study provides adequate quantitative data for quantitative microbial risk assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailRestauration des campos rupestres, une physionomie du biome Cerrado menacé par le changement d’usage des terres
Le Stradic, Soizig ULg; Buisson, Elise; Fernandes, Geraldo Wilson

Poster (2010)

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See detailA mid-size city and IYA09: a case study
Nazé, Yaël ULg

Poster (2010)

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See detailCO2 culling with Influenza Containment Systems (ICS)
Kamers, B.; Everaert, Nadia ULg; Tona, K. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailHD 150136: towards one of the most massive systems?
Mahy, Laurent ULg; Gosset, Eric ULg; Rauw, Grégor ULg et al

Poster (2010)

The improvement of the astronomical instrumentation allowed scientists to develop new analysis techniques to investigate binary and multiple stars. In this context, we present the preliminary results of ... [more ▼]

The improvement of the astronomical instrumentation allowed scientists to develop new analysis techniques to investigate binary and multiple stars. In this context, we present the preliminary results of an intense monitoring devoted to the triple system, HD 150136. Supposed to be the nearest O3 star (1.3 kpc), this object is also composed of two other early O-type stars, making it one of the most massive systems known until now (~ 134Mʘ). This multiple star is a non-thermal radio emitter and presents a colliding wind interaction zone. To determine the physical parameters of this system, we applied a disentangling program to study individually the three components. It allows us to revise their spectral classification and to derive a new orbital solution for the short-period system but also the first one for the entire system. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloping an acoustic map of the north coast of moorea, French Polynesia: a roadmap for settling larvae
Berten, Laetitia ULg; Lecchini, David; Simpson, Steve et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailSpatio-temporal patterns of preys and wastes moved by ants within the nests
Diez, Lise; Lejeune, Philippe ULg; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis et al

Poster (2010)

Living in society in a restricted and confined nest implies important organisational issues. Ants have to control food supply for the whole colony as well as nest defence but they also have to manage ... [more ▼]

Living in society in a restricted and confined nest implies important organisational issues. Ants have to control food supply for the whole colony as well as nest defence but they also have to manage everyday life tasks such as waste rejection. Within the nest, ants are faced with different items that have to be used or rejected regarding colony needs. We study whether they can discriminate between three types of items (building material, nestmate cadaver or prey) and accordingly adapt the spatio-temporal distribution of these items. Therefore, we used colonies of the ant Myrmica rubra settled in a 2-dimensional space and introduced different items in the nest centre. We show that each item triggers a specific cascade of behaviour. We observed important differences in rejection time: building items were removed within a few minutes and cadavers after a few hours while preys could be kept in the nest for a day or more. Furthermore, the movement of items by ants leads to specific spatio-temporal patterns. Building items were removed with a straight trajectory from the centre to the exit of the nest. Ant cadavers that could bear pathogens showed a trajectory avoiding and moving away from larvae that are potentially more sensitive to diseases. The moving of preys headed an oscillating pattern: these items were alternatively taken on larvae for consumption and then moved away from them, until final rejection. This specific pattern may be due to the coupled effects of groups of ants acting alternatively to feed larvae and reject waste. In the case of cadavers and building items, only undertaking ants may be active. These results suggest that each ant is able to discriminate and interact with each other leading at the collective level to a complex cascade of behaviour. [less ▲]

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See detailMicroenvironment and cell fate determination in MCF10A is mediated by ionizing radiation, TGF beta and the extracellular matrix
Fernandez-Garcia, Ignacio; Paupert, Jenny ULg; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary-Helen

Poster (2010)

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See detailThermodynamic and Kinetic Contributions to Stability Adaptation in a Psychrophilic Alpha-amylase
Cipolla, Alexandre; D'Amico, Salvino; Feller, Georges ULg

Poster (2010)

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See detailAnts’ survival and waste management in Myrmica rubra nests
Diez, Lise; Lejeune, Philippe ULg; Detrain, Claire

Poster (2010)

Sociality increases risks of disease transmission as genetically related individuals live in a confined environment. Therefore, social insects developed specific defences against pathogens by showing ... [more ▼]

Sociality increases risks of disease transmission as genetically related individuals live in a confined environment. Therefore, social insects developed specific defences against pathogens by showing hygienic behaviours such as the rejection of cadavers and other wastes. We investigated if the undertaking and waste management is actually an efficient way of increasing ants’ survival and of limiting pathogens transmission. First, we observed the survival curve of ant colonies that were prevented from rejecting their dead nestmates outside the nest. Colonies that were forced to keep their dead inside the nest showed increased mortality of both adults and larvae in comparison to control nests, confirming that undertaking is an effective way for improving colony’s survival. Then, we compared the rejection dynamics of single waste items (ant cadavers, preys and clay pellet) introduced into ant nests. Clay pellets were quickly rejected within 12 ± 4 minutes, cadavers were dumped outside after 139 ± 28 min and preys were eaten and rejected only after 17.3 ± 0.3 hours. Spatial localisation inside the nest also differs between different items, as most cadavers stayed far from ants’ aggregate and larvae while preys were long-eaten close to larvae and inside ants’ aggregate. These results show that cadavers and preys are managed differently before becoming contagious, thus preventing effectively pathogens transmission inside the nest. [less ▲]

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See detailL’imagerie Confocale : un Outil Performant pour le Génie des Procédés Biologiques
Louvet, Jean-Noël ULg; Attik, Ghania; Hupont, Sébastien et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailHeralded entanglement of arbitrary degree in remote atoms by detection of emitted photons
Schilling, U.; Thiel, C.; Solano, E. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailGlobal balances as a basis for ethical statements
Fayyaz, Sara; Kopriwa, Nicole; Hillerbrand, Rafaela et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailDecadal changes of carbon dioxide in the Scheldt estuary
Borges, Alberto ULg; Middelburg, J. J.

Poster (2010)

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See detailhCG: a pregnancy-related hormone stimulating angiogenesis and pericyte recruitment
Berndt, S; Blacher, Silvia ULg; Perrier d’Hauterive, S et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailThe 900-yr sedimentary record of Lago Thompson, Northern Chilean Patagonia
Fagel, Nathalie ULg; Nuttin, L.; Bertrand, S. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailArtificially generating sediment incipient motion in natural conditions
Gob, Frédéric ULg; Houbrechts, Geoffrey ULg; Linares Carreté, Alba et al

Poster (2010)

Incipient motion thresholds for gravel bed rivers are studied in flumes and natural rivers. Flume studies allow variables such as channel slope, water velocity, water depth, sediment size and sediment ... [more ▼]

Incipient motion thresholds for gravel bed rivers are studied in flumes and natural rivers. Flume studies allow variables such as channel slope, water velocity, water depth, sediment size and sediment composition to be controlled. Meanwhile, in the field, the incipient motion of particles is studied in natural conditions allowing the structure of the bed and the flood characteristics to be considered. Though much less developed, an intermediate possibility also exists. By artificially accelerating near bottom velocity of the water flow in a small portion of the bed, it is possible to initiate sediment transport. This allows sediment incipient motion to be observed in natural conditions while controlling the water velocities. The Cemagref (HHLY) has developed a device which confines water flow in a small tunnel on the bottom of the riverbed. It was developed in order to create a boundary layer similar to the one generated by natural flow. Water is injected into a filter which smoothes the flow before it enters a Plexiglas tunnel where sediment motion is observed. The flow is accelerated by two large pumps that allow flow velocities of up to 2.5 m/s in a small area 40 cm long, 20 cm wide and 12 cm high. As the water flow is confined, large scale turbulence similar to that occurring in natural rivers cannot be reproduced using the device. The velocity profile in the tunnel is stable and in equilibrium with the riverbed. Sediment motion was observed using this device on three Belgian gravel bed rivers (3.5 cm <D50<8 cm). The incipient critical velocities measured were coherent in the three rivers sampled, ranging between 1.3 m/s and 1.7 m/s. A progressive increase in velocity in the tunnel permitted size selective entrainment to be observed. Analysis of the particle entrainment schemes and associated velocities allowed the role played by the armoured layer and the Di/D50 ratio to be more fully understood. Critical velocities measured using the device were also compared to critical velocities observed in natural conditions, determined during several pebble tracing campaigns. This revealed that incipient motion velocities of the largest particles recorded in artificial conditions were systematically larger than those observed in natural conditions. This demonstrates the roles played by large scale turbulence and the vertical component of the flow velocity in single particle entrainment. Due to its inherent characteristics, both of these flow components are weak in the artificial conditions generated by the device. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that this type of device is a useful tool in observing and studying incipient motion processes and, in particular, the role played by the bed structure (armouring, protrusion, etc.). However, some improvements are still required in order to more accurately measure critical velocities, allowing critical discharges to be determined. [less ▲]

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See detailSeasonal variation in the essential oil composition of Artemisia herba alba, Growing in Eastern Morocco
Imelouane, B.; El Bachiri, A.; Wathelet, Jean-Paul ULg et al

Poster (2010)

The seasonal and even the number of hours that enable plants to be exposed to sunlight, may influence the phytochemistry of the plant since some compounds may be accumulated at a particular period to ... [more ▼]

The seasonal and even the number of hours that enable plants to be exposed to sunlight, may influence the phytochemistry of the plant since some compounds may be accumulated at a particular period to respond to environmental changes. Objectifs The seasonal variation of the essential oil extracted from the aerial parts of Artemisia herba alba growing in eastern Morocco (Taforalt) has been studied. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards deterministic multipartite entanglement classes in circuit QED
Bastin, Thierry ULg; Toth, G.; Siewert, J. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailAssessment methodology of the intradermal tuberculosis skin test performed in cattle by field practitioners
Humblet, Marie-France ULg; Walravens, K.; Salandre, O. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailUsing time-dependent reference profiles for an instability analysis of an evaporating binary liquid layer
Machrafi, Hatim ULg; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailSpatial variability of the Siphonophora along the radial Calvi-Nice (Corsican side)
Collignon, Amandine ULg; Hecq, Jean-Henri ULg; Goffart, Anne ULg

Poster (2010)

The spatial distribution of the Siphonophorae has been examined, in Occidental Mediterranean, along the radial Calvi-Nice, from Calvi up to 30 miles offshore in September 2009. The variation of the ... [more ▼]

The spatial distribution of the Siphonophorae has been examined, in Occidental Mediterranean, along the radial Calvi-Nice, from Calvi up to 30 miles offshore in September 2009. The variation of the abundance of the plankton and of the Siphonophorae was put in relation with the hydrological structures of the Liguro-Provençal front. This structure separates the coastal waters of Atlantic origin from the offshore central Mediterranean waters of deep origin. Globally, the larger abundances of Siphonophorae were present in inshore waters between the front and the coast. Both nectophores (asexual stage) and gonophores and bracts (reproductive stage) of Lensia subtilis occured only in the inshore waters. The nectophores of Chelophyes appendiculata occured at all sampling stations with no significative variation. However, the abundance of the bracts and the gonophores increases when we get closer to the coast. This allows us to hypothesize that the maximum of reproduction is located in waters close to the coast. On the other hand, the larvae abundance of calycophoran siphonophores, in the plankton samples, increase from the coastal waters to the offshore waters with a maximum of abundance at the station located at 25 miles offshore. That contradiction could be explained by plankton net avoidance of small larvae, by current transport or by variable hatching success at the various stations. The larvae of physonect siphonophores are more often found offshore. [less ▲]

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See detailResidual stress measurement in dental prostheses by hole-drilling.
Mainjot, Amélie ULg; Schajer, Gary; Vanheusden, Alain ULg et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailL’extraction des huiles essentielles par micro-ondes : Quels avantages ?
Ramdani, M.; Benchat, N.; Amhamdi, H. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailA 500-yr record of Northern Patagonian environmental changes: Lago Plomo and Lago Bertrand
Fagel, Nathalie ULg; Brix, J.; El Ouahabi, M. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailInfluence of operating conditions on the gaseous emissions related to urban residual sludge convective drying
Fraikin, Laurent ULg; Herbreteau, Benjamin; Chaucherie, Xavier et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailLate Holocene environmental changes recorded in the sediments of Lago Thompson, Northern Chilean Patagonia
Fagel, Nathalie ULg; Nuttin, L.; Bertrand, S. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailSimultaneous quantification os asiaticoside, asiatic acid, madecassoside and madecassic acid in leaves of Centella asiatica (L.) urb.
Rafamantanana, M. H.; Rozet, Eric ULg; Raoelison, G. E. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailEnvironmental changes in two lakes of Northern Patagonia (Chile): A 1000 yr reconstruction based on pollen and charcoal.
Vargas, N.; Torres, L.; Araneda, A. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailEffets du mode d’extraction des huiles essentielles sur l’efficacité de l’inhibition de la corrosion
ramdani, M.; Benchat, N.; Amhamdi, H. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailTechnique d’extraction et activité antibactérienne des huiles essentielles
Benchat, N.; Amhamdi, H.; Wathelet, Jean-Paul ULg et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailTraces metal inputs in the Misten bog (East Belgium): Level of contamination and spatial variability
Allan, M.; Fagel, Nathalie ULg; De Vleeschouwer, F. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailA 14,000 yr elemental and lead isotopis record in a peat core in the south of Poland –results and interpretation
Tudyka, K.; De Vleeschouwer, F.; Pazdur, A. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailAtmospheric lead deposition in an ombrotrophic peat bog of Southern Poland
Fiałkiewicz-Kozieł, B.; De Vleeschouwer, F.; Smieja-Król, B. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailA paleorecord of atmospheric lead deposition in France. New data from “La Godivelle” peat bog (Puy de Dôme)
De vleeschouwer, F.; Mattielli, N.; Renson, V. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailBenthic remineralisation in the Northeast European Continental margin (Northern Biscay Bay)
Suykens, K.; Schmidt, S.; Delille, Bruno ULg et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailImproving the grinding performance in ball mills with a conductive and inductive sensor
Köttgen, Axel ULg; de Haas, Bernard; Keshav, Pratish et al

Poster (2010)

A series of tests were conducted in a South African concentrator on the secondary grinding mill. The results were analysed and provided showed the importance of selecting an optimum density and filling ... [more ▼]

A series of tests were conducted in a South African concentrator on the secondary grinding mill. The results were analysed and provided showed the importance of selecting an optimum density and filling degree of the mill. Moreover, a Sensomag (r) is installed on this mill and the surveys showed that an increase of the density was improving the mixing of balls in the pulp and increasing the grinding performance. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of a new crossbred based evaluation for carcass quality of Piétrain boars in the Walloon Region of Belgium
Dufrasne, Marie ULg; Hammami, Hedi ULg; Jaspart, Véronique et al

Poster (2010)

The aim of this study was to develop a genetic evaluation model to estimate the genetic merit of Piétrain boars for some carcass quality traits. These boars are now evaluated on performances recorded on ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to develop a genetic evaluation model to estimate the genetic merit of Piétrain boars for some carcass quality traits. These boars are now evaluated on performances recorded on their crossbred progeny fattened in a central test station. Data provided by the on-farm performance recording system were utilized in this study. Traits analysed were backfat thickness (BF) and lean meat percentage (%meat). The data file contains 60 546 records measured on pigs between 150 and 300 days of age. Model developed was a multitrait animal model. Fixed effects were sex, contemporary groups and heterosis, modeled as regression on heterozygosity. Random effects were additive genetic and permanent environment, modeled by random regressions using linear splines, and residual. Variance components were estimated by restricted maximum likelihood (REML) method on random samples of the total dataset and then confirmed by a Gibbs sampling algorithm on the total dataset. Fit of the model was tested by computing residuals from a BLUP (Best Linear Unbiased Prediction) evaluation. BF and %meat have a high heritability that increase with age. These two traits are also highly genetically correlated. Mean residuals are not significantly different from zero for both traits. Given that BF and %meat had high heritability, genetic improvement of carcass quality is possible by selection on these two traits. Like residuals are close to zero for both traits, it seems that model developed explain a great proportion the variance in each traits. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of the Essential Oil of Myrtus communis L. from Algeria
Brada, M.; Hennia, A.; Nemmiche, S. et al

Poster (2010)

This study deals with the valorisation of medicinal and aromatic plants of the Algerian flora, in order to find new bioactive natural products. Myrtus communis essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation ... [more ▼]

This study deals with the valorisation of medicinal and aromatic plants of the Algerian flora, in order to find new bioactive natural products. Myrtus communis essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation was investigated by capillary gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Twenty-seven volatile compounds were identified in the leaves essential oil; the major components were: -pinene (23.5 %), limonene (22.9 %), 1,8-cineole (16.1 %), linalool (13.0%), linalyl acetate (10.9%) and geranyl acetate (4.6%). The antibacterial activity of essential oils extracts was evaluated by the diffusion method and by the dilution method in liquid medium on pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella sp, Proteus sp and Klebsiella sp). [less ▲]

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See detailEtude de la composition chimique de l'huile essentielle du lentisque de la région orientale du Maroc
Aouinti, F.; Amhamdi, H.; Wathelet, Jean-Paul ULg et al

Poster (2010)

Le lentisque ou pistachier appartient à la famille des Anacardiacées. C'est un arbuste poussant dans les sites arides de la région méditerranéenne (Asie, Europe, Afrique). On l'appelle aussi arbre à ... [more ▼]

Le lentisque ou pistachier appartient à la famille des Anacardiacées. C'est un arbuste poussant dans les sites arides de la région méditerranéenne (Asie, Europe, Afrique). On l'appelle aussi arbre à mastic car sa sève est utilisée pour la réalisation d'une gomme à odeur prononcée. Son huile essentielle est obtenue par hydrodistillation et analysée par chromatographie en phase gazeuse. L'objectif ce ce travail est l'étude de la composition chimique de l'huile essentielle du lentisque récolté de différentes zones de la région orientale du Maroc. [less ▲]

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