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See detailNoninvasive quantification of [18F]UCB-H binding using microPET and population-based input function.
Becker, Guillaume ULiege; Warnier, C; Serrano Navacerrada, Maria Elisa ULiege et al

Poster (2017, February 19)

Introduction: [18F]UCB-H is a validated radiotracer with a high affinity for the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A (SV2A), known as the binding site of the antiepileptic drug levetiracetam [1, 2]. Due to ... [more ▼]

Introduction: [18F]UCB-H is a validated radiotracer with a high affinity for the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A (SV2A), known as the binding site of the antiepileptic drug levetiracetam [1, 2]. Due to the absence of reference region, the major drawback of SV2A microPET imaging in the living rat brain is the invasiveness and the complexity of the arterial input function measurement needed for a full quantification. We provide here evaluation of a population-based input function (PBIF) to estimate input function of [18F]UCB-H. Methods: Standard arterial input functions were measured with an arteriovenous shunt and a β-microprobe system from eight anesthetized Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, as previously described [2]. The distribution volume (Vt) for [18F]UCB-H was calculated with Logan graphic analysis. After normalization, all individual AIFs were averaged to provide the PBIF, and the Logan graphical analysis was computed on each individual rat using the PBIF instead of individual AIF. Correlations analyses were computed between Vt obtained with each methods (individual AIF vs PBIF). Finally, another cohort of five SD rats was scanned with [18F]UCB-H, and Vt were computed using the PBIF and Logan analysis. Single blood samples were harvested at 15 min after radiotracer injection, just to ensure the consistency of the metabolic parent fraction. Results: The Vt computed with individual AIFs were higly consistent with previously reported values, so are the Vt computed with the PBIF [2]. Individual AIFs Vt and PBIF Vt are highly correlated through all brain areas for the height subjects (r2 =0.9). Coefficients of variance are slightly higher with the PBIF method compare to the individual AIF method (14 % and 9 % respectively for the whole brain). Finally, Vt measurement in the second cohort were consistent with previously reported values, and the metabolization profile matched the parent fraction described by Warnock and coll. [2]. Conclusions: The present study described a method for the noninvasive estimation of the AIF using a PBIF, carrying a potential that might substitute for conventional invasive, indivi- dual AIF measurement. We propose that this method can provide a reasonable solution for longitudinal quantitative [18F]UCB-H microPET studies. [less ▲]

Peer Reviewed
See detailProteomic differential distribution of 53BP1 in serrated and conventional adenomas validated by histological characterisation
QUESADA-CALVO, Florence ULiege; Merli, Angela-Maria ULiege; MASSOT, Charlotte ULiege et al

Poster (2017, February 10)

INTRODUCTION: Sessile serrated adenoma/polyp (SSA/p) is a precancerous lesion, mostly located in the right side of the colon (cecum, ascending and transverse colon). The difficulty is to visualize this ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Sessile serrated adenoma/polyp (SSA/p) is a precancerous lesion, mostly located in the right side of the colon (cecum, ascending and transverse colon). The difficulty is to visualize this lesion during colonoscopy because of its subtle appearance. MATERIAL AND METHOD: We compared proteomes of serrated polyps (SSA/p) and conventional adenomas using residual human formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples. FFPE-FASP method was applied on samples before label free proteomic analysis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) characterisation of one candidate marker was performed for tissue validation on an independent set of samples including: conventional adenomas (low and high-grade dysplasia), serrated polyps (hyperplastic polyps, SSA/p and traditional serrated adenoma) and finally normal colon (taken at the margin of colorectal cancer (CRC) or of diverticular disease). RESULTS: Proteomics provided 765 proteins (out of 5992 proteins identified) significantly discriminating conventional adenomas from serrated lesions. We selected 53BP1 (Tumor suppressor p53-binding protein 1) among these for IHC validation, because of its tumor suppressor gene function and role as a mediator of DNA damage checkpoint. 53BP1 appeared significantly up-regulated in proteomes of low and high grade adenomas compared to these of normal tissue and SSA/p. 53BP1 IHC signal was located in the nucleus and the percentage of positive nucleus decreased in serrated polyps, especially in crypts and in the border epithelium, confirming part of the proteomic results. CONCLUSION: This study highlights potential marker proteins, including 53BP1 from which IHC signal was strongly decreased in some serrated polyps. The loss of 53BP1 has been associated with tumour progression and poor prognosis, while little is currently known about its involvement in precancerous CRC lesions. 53BP1 decrease of expression in the nucleus and therefore possible loss of function in some epithelial cells could reflect important changes occurring during dysplasia to neoplasia progression in serrated lesions. [less ▲]

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See detailNon-visual effect of light on cognitive brain function: Impact of lens yellowing in aging
Daneault, Véronique; Dumont, Marie; Massé, Eric et al

Poster (2017, February 10)

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See detailLab Pay(S)age: a Laboratory of Observation as an activator for Landscape Awareness Process
Baldin, Elisa ULiege; Occhiuto, Rita ULiege

Poster (2017, February 09)

The notion of Landscape Observatory (ELC 2000), in the work of LabVTP at the Faculty of Architecture in the University of Liège (Wallonia-BE), has been linked with the concept of Landscape Laboratory (R ... [more ▼]

The notion of Landscape Observatory (ELC 2000), in the work of LabVTP at the Faculty of Architecture in the University of Liège (Wallonia-BE), has been linked with the concept of Landscape Laboratory (R. Gustavsson) in order to enhance and underline perceptive, experiential and active dimensions of sites, responding to the Universities’ missions required by the ELC: education and sensitization. Lab Pay(s)age, as a new typology of landscape laboratory, has developed methodological tools for landscape research, based on a multi-scale and diachronic reading of the territory, where natural and artificial traces are the complementary elements to be reinterpreted and relaunched in new participative scenarios. The Meuse valley, reshaped by deep transformations, is the main topic for researches, concerning specific morphological, typological and social characters. All along the river, the scars of industries mark the territory as a land in search of new cycle of life1. The regeneration of abandoned industrial sites, as a practice of territorial recycle, is part of sustainability policies in urban planning, based on the enhancement of local resources. The Observatory Lab Pay(s)age, is intended as a structure for site-specific study and continuous fieldwork, concerning both the evolutionary processes of natural structures and the involution of built environment. Starting from these materials, many different regeneration methodologies and temporalities have been imagined. Following the logic promoted by the ELC, the work has started by monitoring some specific areas and by contacting different local representatives with the aim of collecting data and experiences to construct a shared knowledge of the places. Then the project has become an on-going tool including all phases in the regeneration process: observation, analysis, interpretation and re-launch of new hypothesis are fundamental elements to increase the public knowledge about the cultural factors characterizing the landscape discipline. Thus, the notion of « observatory » is a strategic device, monitoring the evolution of places in time through actions of dialogue and awareness raising, in order to get citizens re-acquire a consciousness of their territory. The collected qualitative data, describe the peculiar features of the sites, based on the local actors experience and knowledge. These elements are the basis for new scenarios, used as progressive steps leading the recovery process. For this reason, the « observatory » is also a « laboratory », as the experimental projects accompany the transformation of the places through intermediate phases. Understanding and accepting mutability as a character of landscape is a preliminary step towards a co-action, where the project accords with natural dynamics. Lab Pay(s)age, according to the ELC principles, is using the earliest local answers as re-launch factors for consecutive projects, taking into account the territorial temporalities as priority in transformation process. The presentation concerns the ongoing projects and obtained reactions, such as the earliest re-naturalization programs, some selected sites for monitoring activities and Phd researches on new regeneration methods using vegetation as an active element in reclamation of industrial sites. 1 Occhiuto, R. 2016. Healing the scars of industry in Liège, in Scape n.15, 2016 [less ▲]

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See detailImportance of using Geographic Information System for extensive Middle Palaeolithic open air sites in northern France. The example of Caours (Somme, France) and Beauvais (Oise, France).
Moreau, Gwénaëlle ULiege; Locht, Jean-Luc; Patou-Mathis, Marylène et al

Poster (2017, February 09)

During the middle Palaeolithic, the northern France was only occupied by Neanderthals groups. However, successions of glacial and interglacial cycles explain a complex and discontinuous settlement ... [more ▼]

During the middle Palaeolithic, the northern France was only occupied by Neanderthals groups. However, successions of glacial and interglacial cycles explain a complex and discontinuous settlement, raising complication in the study of its dynamics at a regional scale. Therefore, some aspects of Neanderthals behaviour are still mischaracterize: in most cases, the function of the site and its territorial management over the northern France have to be specified. The spatial analysis of open air sites from northern France will help us to answer those questions. However, for Middle Palaeolithic sites, we can't see systematically on the field the spatial organisation directly, we sometimes need modelization. Therefore, we started to build a spatial analysis protocol adapted to this site and applied to such sites. The sites of Caours (Somme, France) and Beauvais (Oise, France) are two open air sites that are exceptionally well preserved and displaying a large amount of faunal and lithic rests. Both are perfect candidate to apply and test the new protocol. First results proved that for each site the existence of a spatial organisation as remains concentration zones. Then, we characterize this areas – number, distribution. Finally, we were able to associate them to human activity areas like hearths, butchery or knapping areas. [less ▲]

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See detailRegression analysis of different sources of dormancy duration value for the potato varieties.
Visse-Mansiaux, Margot ULiege; Vanderschuren, Hervé ULiege; Soyeurt, Hélène ULiege et al

Poster (2017, February 08)

A dormancy value or duration defines the period potato tubers can be stored before initiating sprouting. Characterization of dormancy value provides useful information to implement strategies for short or ... [more ▼]

A dormancy value or duration defines the period potato tubers can be stored before initiating sprouting. Characterization of dormancy value provides useful information to implement strategies for short or long-term storage of potato varieties and can be instrumental to schedule treatment of potato tubers with sprouting inhibitors. The dormancy values of the varieties are provided by breeders. Those values can be retrieved from online databases. The objective of this study is to compare the dormancy values gathered from online databases with the dormancy values collected in Switzerland through field and storage experiments. This comparison is performed using linear regression analysis. So, 2 sources of information were used: 1) dormancy of cultivars provided by breeders (breeders dormancy) 2) dormancy of cultivars obtained from field experiments (field dormancy). The field experiments were managed in Switzerland during 25 years in four different locations and for 721 varieties of potatoes. Field data were registered during the growing season such as weather data (e.g. temperature, rainfall etc.), soil data and crop management data. One month after harvest, the potatoes were stored at 8°C in wooden crates containing 7 kg of potato tubers. The dormancy was defined as the time between the harvest and the emergence of the first sprouts. The results are the following: the dormancy of cultivars provides by online databases are incomplete and heterogeneous. This can be explained by the heterogeneity of the methods used by breeders to determine the dormancy values (e.g. the use of different control varieties and the use of different dormancy scales). The comparison of breeders and field dormancy through linear regression leads to the proposal of novel methodologies to assess and calculate the dormancy values of the potato varieties. Our results also stress the importance of climatic and field parameters to estimate the dormancy length of a given potato stock. [less ▲]

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See detailPeptidoglycan fragments separation and identification by zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography and capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry
Boulanger, Madeleine ULiege; Raymackers, Alice ULiege; Delvaux, Cédric ULiege et al

Poster (2017, February 08)

Bacterial peptidoglycan-derived peptides and muropeptides are soluble unique fragments acting as messengers in diverse cell-signalling events. As the bacterial peptidoglycan wall is a major target of ... [more ▼]

Bacterial peptidoglycan-derived peptides and muropeptides are soluble unique fragments acting as messengers in diverse cell-signalling events. As the bacterial peptidoglycan wall is a major target of antibiotics, bacteria have developed specific resistance mechanisms based on the detection of such fragments. In addition, the muropeptides sensing is involved in the innate immune response toward bacterial invasion and is therefore of major importance in the eukaryotes self-defence functions. In Bacillus licheniformis 749/I, the peptidoglycan dipeptide m-A2pm-D-Glu triggers beta-lactam resistance via the induction of a beta-lactamase, BlaP. This induction process relies on a complex regulation system for which the nature and the concentration of peptidoglycan fragments leading to the formation of dipeptide moiety inside the cytoplasm are unknown. In this context, the development and the validation of a reliable method to identify and quantify those cytoplasmic fragments is of major interest. Conventionally, the peptidoglycan is first digested by mutanolysin in order to generate muropeptides which are subsequently analyzed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC, C18). However, this technique is not effective enough to separate the peptides that, as a result, are eluted in the flow through . In this work, we developed two novel analytical separation methods, namely capillary electrophoresis (CE) and zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (ZIC-HILIC) both coupled to mass spectrometry (MS), aiming at overcoming the drawbacks encountered in traditional separation techniques. Both methods show great results in the identification of peptidoglycan fragments in complex samples. CE analysis lead to muropeptides and peptides separation whereas ZIC-HILIC only retains peptides. Nevertheless, the latter has been optimized and validated for the cytoplasmic peptidoglycan peptides identification and quantification. Althogether, ZIC-HILIC-MS and CE-MS have proved to be powerful analytical tools for the identification and quantification of peptidoglycan fragments in complex matrix samples. Further optimizations are still ongoing for the analysis of muropeptides, which hopefully will lead to the identification and quantification of cytoplasmic peptidoglycan fragments composition during the Bacillus licheniformis 749/I BlaP beta-lactamase induction process. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of two laboratory-scale ensiling methods to assess effect of reducing sugars
Herremans, Sophie ULiege; Decruyenaere, Virginie; Beckers, Yves ULiege et al

Poster (2017, February 07)

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See detailInterfacial properties of milk fat globule membrane- A langmuir film balance study
Malik, Priyanka ULiege; Danthine, Sabine ULiege; Blecker, Christophe ULiege

Poster (2017, February 07)

Milk fat globule membrane provides stability to the lipids in milk. The backbone of the milk fat globule membrane is composed of a phospholipid in which proteins and cholesterol are embedded. In a ... [more ▼]

Milk fat globule membrane provides stability to the lipids in milk. The backbone of the milk fat globule membrane is composed of a phospholipid in which proteins and cholesterol are embedded. In a prospective first attempt to understand the complexities in a biological system, the interfacial properties of polar lipids from milk fat globule membrane and intact milk fat globule membrane were studied using langmuir film balance. Monolayers were studied at oil/water interface where a low melting anhydrous milk fat fraction was used as oil phase and ultrapure water was used as water phase. Further, using the compression isotherm, film elasticity was also calculated. The results obtained using monolayer studies provide a fundamental insight on the interfacial nature of milk fat globule membrane. [less ▲]

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See detailQuality and chemical composition of longissimus dorsi muscle of Béni-Guil sheep breeding in eastern Morocco
Belhaj, Kamal ULiege; Mansouri, Farid; Ben-Moumen, Abdessamad et al

Poster (2017, February 07)

The aim of the present study was to analyze the lipid, cholesterol, fatty acids composition and amino acids from red meat of Béni-Guil sheep breeding in eastern of Morocco, which was breeded in semi ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study was to analyze the lipid, cholesterol, fatty acids composition and amino acids from red meat of Béni-Guil sheep breeding in eastern of Morocco, which was breeded in semi-extensive breeding, Its very appreciated by the consumer, but this good reputation is still only on Informal Hedonic Tests, the Consumers speak about the best sheep meat as regards the quality and intensity of its aroma and succulence, flavour and tenderness. The objective of this research is to evaluate the nutritional, organoleptic and health quality of this meat by biochemical analyzes, in particular the cholesterol, fatty acid profile (FA) and amino acid composition of the longissumus dorsi muscle. Meat quality was measured on the longissimus dorsi (LD). The results showed that 100g of fresh meat contains 25.72% of dry matter, including 5.14% of Fat, 19.43% of protein and 0.94% of mineral matter. The fatty acid profile measured showed that 100 grams of fat contains 24.98 grams fatty acids, including 49.45% saturated fatty acid, 38.48% monounsaturated fatty acid and 12.40% polyunsaturated fatty acid. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of amino acids composition allowed the identification of more than 18 components including six essential amino acids (Ile, Leu Lys, Thr, Val, Phe). [less ▲]

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See detailLoss of transfer RNA U34 modifying enzymes impairs hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell differentiation and function
Rosu, Adeline ULiege; Bai, Qiang ULiege; Ramery, Eve ULiege et al

Poster (2017, February 03)

Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) require fine-tuned protein translation for their normal maintenance and function. Conserved modifications of the wobble uridine base (U34) in transfer RNAs ... [more ▼]

Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) require fine-tuned protein translation for their normal maintenance and function. Conserved modifications of the wobble uridine base (U34) in transfer RNAs catalyzed by the Elongator complex are required for optimal protein translation efficacy and fidelity, but their biological importance in mammalian stem and progenitor cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we studied the impact of loss of activity of the catalytic subunit Elp3 of Elongator on HSPC differentiation and function. Hematopoietic-cell-specific depletion of Elp3 in conditional knockout mice resulted in shortened lifespan associated with hematopoietic failure and lymphoma development. Elp3 deletion caused apoptosis of specific bone marrow multipotent progenitors and blocked differentiation of committed progenitors, resulting in blood and bone marrow pancytopenia. In contrast, Elp3-deficient hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) expanded with age and did not exhaust throughout life, although they were defective in reconstituting hematopoiesis in competitive transplantation assays. Mechanistically, loss of Elp3 did not result in detectable alterations in global protein synthesis rates in any HSPC subset. Rather, Elp3-deficient HSPCs displayed enhanced activity of the stress integrator and apoptosis and cell cycle regulator p53. Thus, this study supports the notion that Elongator activity is required in distinct HSPC subsets to avoid aberrant p53 activation, which otherwise results in discrete loss of function phenotypes in HSCs and downstream progenitors. [less ▲]

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See detailCrosstalk between VEGF and BMP9 pathway. Implications in HHT disease
Pollenus, Thomas ULiege

Poster (2017, February 01)

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See detailIdentification of proteins discriminating inflammation induced dysplasia from simple inflammation in ulcerative colitis by laser capture microdissection and label free proteomics – a pilot study
Merli, Angela-Maria ULiege; QUESADA-CALVO, Florence ULiege; MASSOT, Charlotte ULiege et al

Poster (2017, February 01)

Chronic colonic inflammation in ulcerative colitis (UC) may induce dysplasia, which can itself progress and transform into neoplasia. Diagnosis of dysplasia in UC remains difficult particularly when ... [more ▼]

Chronic colonic inflammation in ulcerative colitis (UC) may induce dysplasia, which can itself progress and transform into neoplasia. Diagnosis of dysplasia in UC remains difficult particularly when tissue inflammation is present. The aim of this retrospective pilot study was to highlight proteins specifically associated with inflammation induced dysplasia in UC. We performed a pilot experiment on 15 Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) samples isolated from 5 cases of UC patients with a Polypoïd Pedunculated dysplasia (UC-PP). We compared the proteomes of the UC-PP, the inflammatory (UC-I) and the normal (UC-NL) tissues of each patient. We performed Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) in order to collect only epithelial cells, avoiding inflammatory infiltrating ones. Label free proteomic analysis using a 2D-nanoUPLC coupled with a hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap was applied, as well as differential analysis on the paired samples. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) characterisation of one of the selected proteins of interest was used for validation. Out of 985 quantified proteins, 7 were found significantly more abundant in UC-PP compared to UC-I tissues, with 6 being only detected in UC-PP using proteomics. One of these is Solute Carrier Family 12 member 2 (SLC12A2), also known as Na-K-2Cl co-transporter 1 (NKCC1), a protein involved in ionic balance, in T-cell migration promotion and in some features involved in cancer development like proliferation, migration or invasion. IHC results obtained were in correlation with proteomic results and showed that SLC12A2 was more abundant in UC-PP tissue than in UC-I and UC-NL tissues, with a signal clearly delimiting the dysplastic region from the surrounding inflammatory tissue. This pilot experiment shows a different proteomic profile in inflammation-associated dysplasia and simple inflammation. This should be replicated using other types of dysplasia in IBD. SLC12A2 could be a potential biomarker of inflammation-associated dysplasia. [less ▲]

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See detailImproved Blood Glucose Forecasting Models using Changes in Insulin Sensitivity in Intensive Care Patients
Uyttendaele, Vincent ULiege; Dickson, Jennifer; Shaw, Geoff et al

Poster (2017, February 01)

Introduction: Hyperglycaemia, hypoglycaemia and glycaemic variability are associated with worsened outcomes and increased mortality in intensive care units. Glycaemic control (GC) using insulin therapy ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Hyperglycaemia, hypoglycaemia and glycaemic variability are associated with worsened outcomes and increased mortality in intensive care units. Glycaemic control (GC) using insulin therapy has shown improved outcomes, but have been proven difficult to repeat or achieve safely. STAR (Stochastic TARgeted) is a model-based glycaemic control protocol using a stochastic model to forecast distributions of likely future changes in insulin sensitivity (SI) based on its current value. This can be used to determine likely future blood glucose (BG) levels for a given intervention, enabling the most optimal dose selection that best overlaps a clinically defined BG target band. This study presents a novel 3D model capable to predict likely future distribution of SI using both current SI and its prior variability (%ΔSI). Methods: Metabolic data from 3 clinical ICU cohorts totalling 819 episodes and 68629 hours of treatment under STAR and SPRINT protocols are used in this study. Data triplets (%ΔSIn, SIn, SIn+1) are created and binned together in a range of %ΔSI = [-100%, 200%] and SIn = [1.0e-7, 2.1e-3] in bin sizes of %ΔSI = 10% and SIn = 0.5e-4. The 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile of SIn+1 are determined for each bin where data density is high enough (>100 triplets) and compared to the previous stochastic model. The predictive power of the two models are compared by computing median [IQR] per-patient percentage prediction of SI within the 5th-95th and 25th-75th percentile ranges of model predictions. Results: Results show the previous model is over-conservative for ~77% of the data, mainly where %ΔSI is within an absolute 25% change. The percentage change in the 90% CI width in this region is reduced by ~25-40%. Conversely, non-conservative regions are also identified, with 90% CI width increased up to ~80%. Predictive power is similar for both model (60.3% [47.8%, 71.5%] vs. 51.2 [42.9%, 59.2%] within 25th-75th and 93.6% [85.7%, 97.3%] vs. 90.7% [84.4%, 94.6%] within 5th-95th range). Conclusions: The new 3D model achieved similar predictive power as the previous model by reducing the 5th-95th percentile prediction range for 77% of the data, predominantly where SI is stable. If the conservatism of the previous model reduces risk of hypoglycaemia, it also inhibits the controller’s ability to reduce BG to the normal range by safely using more aggressive dosing. The 3D new model thus better characterises patient-specific response to insulin, and allows more optimal dosing, increasing performance and safety. [less ▲]

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See detailZinc, manganese and iron interaction within the frd3 Arabidopsis mutant
Scheepers, Maxime ULiege; Spielmann, Julien ULiege; Goormaghtigh, Erik et al

Poster (2017, February 01)

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See detailA multiscale model of the human cardiovascular system can account for the Frank-Starling effect on vascular filling therapy
Kosta, Sarah ULiege; Pironet, Antoine; Negroni, Jorge et al

Poster (2017, February 01)

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See detailStudy of interactions and activities of the enzymatic core of the divisome in E. coli
Boes, Adrien ULiege

Poster (2017, February 01)

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See detailUsing unsupervised clustering method and SNP-based information to identify fine-level population structure
Chaichoompu, Kridsadakorn ULiege; Yazew, Fentaw Abegaz; Tongsima, Sissades et al

Poster (2017, February 01)

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See detailMyoferlin, a new autophagy player in pancreatic cancer cells
Rademaker, Gilles ULiege; Hennequière, Vincent ULiege; Peixoto, Paul et al

Poster (2017, February 01)

Despite intensive research, Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the deadliest forms of cancer. Early-stage of the disease is clinically silent and the diagnosis of the disease is mostly ... [more ▼]

Despite intensive research, Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the deadliest forms of cancer. Early-stage of the disease is clinically silent and the diagnosis of the disease is mostly made at an advanced stage. This late diagnosis contributes to one of the lowest 5-year survival rates (<5%). Today, PDAC are treated by surgery and/or adjuvant therapy, increasing only slightly the median survival of the patients. There is therefore an urgent need to develop new effective therapies for PDAC patients. PDAC are characterized by a high autophagic activity involved in its chemoresistance. Recently, key regulatory proteins controlling the metabolic reprogramming of PDAC cells were identified. By governing both autophagic flux and lysosomal catabolism, these proteins support the efficient processing of cargo from autophagy, providing PDAC cells with access to critical sources of nutrients. Interestingly, the high autophagy level in PDAC correlates with a poor patient outcome. Myoferlin, a member of the ferlin family overexpressed at protein level in different cancer types including PDAC, is a transmembrane protein able to bound to phospholipids and described to play an important function in membrane fusion. This characteristic invited us to investigate whether myoferlin could participate to autophagy, a process involving membrane fusion. Panc-1 cell line was used as a model of PDAC basal autophagy. Myoferlin expression was silenced using interfering RNA technology. Autophagosome abundance was evaluated by LC3-II western-blot and flow cytometry. Results indicated a significant increase in autophagosome abundance 48 h after myoferlin-silencing. This increase could arise from an increase of autophagy initiation or from an inhibition of autolysosome degradation. Using autophagy inhibitors, autophagic flux was evaluated by LC3-II and p62 western-blot after myoferlin-silencing. Results suggested a blockade in the autophagic process, impairing termination and autophagosome degradation by lysosome activity. Knowing the affinity of myoferlin for phospholipids, we wonder if this protein could interact with the phosphatidylethanolamine-conjugated LC3-II protein. Proximity-ligation assay suggested a close interaction between myoferlin and LC3. These results evoke an unexplored and undescribed role for myoferlin in autophagy. Understanding the involvement of myoferlin in this rediscovered biological process could give new clues in the development of new therapeutic strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailApplication of Qualitative Thematic Analysis to Near-Death Experiences
Cassol, Helena ULiege; Pétré, Benoît ULiege; Degrange, Sophie ULiege et al

Poster (2017, February 01)

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See detailModelling BMP-2 carrier device for bone tissue engineering application
Manhas, Varun ULiege; Carlier, Aurelie; Geris, Liesbet ULiege

Poster (2017, February 01)

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See detailCellular stress and β-lactamase BlaP induction in Bacillus licheniformis
Dauvin, Marjorie ULiege; Joris, Bernard ULiege

Poster (2017, February 01)

In presence of β-lactam antibiotic in its environment, B. licheniformis produces the β-lactamase BlaP, an enzyme hydrolyzing β-lactam antibiotic, conferring on the bacteria phenotypic resistance. To ... [more ▼]

In presence of β-lactam antibiotic in its environment, B. licheniformis produces the β-lactamase BlaP, an enzyme hydrolyzing β-lactam antibiotic, conferring on the bacteria phenotypic resistance. To induce BlaP, two conditions must be fulfilled. The first one is the acylation of the membrane receptor BlaR1 by the antibiotic. The second one is a cellular stress due to the presence of the antibiotic which acylate PBP1. The nature of this signal remains unknown. In this study we postulate that the extracytoplasmic function sigma factors (ECFs) σM and σX act together with the stringent response as a secondary and redundant layer of stress upon which the BlaP induction pathway relies. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluating the specificity of [18F] UCB-H for the isoform SV2A, compared with isoforms SV2B and SV2C
Serrano Navacerrada, Maria Elisa ULiege; Becker, Guillaume ULiege; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege et al

Poster (2017, February 01)

Background: SV2A is the most studied isoform of the Synaptic Vesicle 2 proteins, which are involved in the synaptic vesicle trafficking, being important in normal and pathological process, like the ... [more ▼]

Background: SV2A is the most studied isoform of the Synaptic Vesicle 2 proteins, which are involved in the synaptic vesicle trafficking, being important in normal and pathological process, like the epilepsy (1, 2). [18F]UCB-H was developed like a tool to study the role of this isoform with neuroimaging techniques (3, 4). The objective of this study was to evaluate its specificity to this isoform comparing with the others, through a competition assay in rats with ex-vivo autoradiography and mPET imaging. Methods: Forty male Sprague-Dawley were used in ex-vivo autoradiography experiments (N=20) and in microPET imaging (N=20). Animals were pre-treated 30 minutes before the injection of [18F]UCB-H with a dose IP either of vehicle, Keppra (SV2A ligand), UCB068 (SV2B ligand) or UCB054 (SV2C ligand). Ex-vivo autoradiography was carried out 5 minutes after radiotracer injection while mPET images were acquiring with a dynamic scanner of 1 hour. Data were expressed in Standard Uptake Value and then, the area under the curve was calculated for the total process. Results: In ex-vivo autoradiography, ANOVA of two-ways showed statistical significant differences in brain uptake of [18F]UCB-H among the groups pretreated with Keppra or the ligand for SV2B and the control group. Regarding mPET data, statistical significant differences were found between the group injected with keppra and the rest of groups. Conclusion: Even if a considerable affinity between the ligands UCB068 and UCB054, and the receptor for the isoform SV2A exists, it is only detected during the first 5 minutes (ex-vivo technique), being certainly due to a nonspecific binding. This binding is not strong enough to show a direct competition with the radiotracer during a mPET acquisition. These results allow us to conclude that [18F]UCB-H is a suitable radiotracer for the imaging of the isoform SV2A in vivo, allowing us the clinical study about the molecular base of a disease with a high population impact, like the epilepsy. [less ▲]

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See detailMegaloolithid dinosaur eggs: scrambled parataxonomy and nesting strategies
Jentgen, Benjamin ULiege; Stein, Koen; Fischer, Valentin ULiege

Poster (2017, February)

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See detailEcological intensification of fish production : Fertilization strategies in Africa fish farms
Mafwila Kinkela, Patrick ULiege; Kambashi Mutiaka, Bienvenu ULiege; Rollin, Xavier et al

Poster (2017, February)

Ponds fertilization has been found as strategies of intensification fish production for farm in Africa were commercial feeds are not available and ingredients for formulate completed feed are cost ... [more ▼]

Ponds fertilization has been found as strategies of intensification fish production for farm in Africa were commercial feeds are not available and ingredients for formulate completed feed are cost. However, farmers are not safe to any danger because the efficiency of these strategies is not always known owing to the associated risk of eutrophication. An experience was making to assess how various fertilization practices would impact fish growth and physicochemical parameters of water in the pond. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of the low-mass companion HD 142527 B
Christiaens, Valentin ULiege; Casassus, Simon; Absil, Olivier ULiege et al

Poster (2017, February)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (4 ULiège)
See detailNew data on the Mesozoic radiation of chelonioids
Scavezzoni, Isaure ULiege; Fischer, Valentin ULiege

Poster (2017, February)

"Turtles" (Testudines) form a successful group of reptiles with several terrestrial, marine and fresh-water species. Their peculiar and somewhat constrained morphology (i. e. : carapace incorporating ribs ... [more ▼]

"Turtles" (Testudines) form a successful group of reptiles with several terrestrial, marine and fresh-water species. Their peculiar and somewhat constrained morphology (i. e. : carapace incorporating ribs, curved limbs, anapsid skull exempt of temporal fenestrae) and ecology has often obscured their relationships and, hence, their evolutionary history, notably in marine turtles (chelonioids). Modern chelonioids are divided in two clades (i. e. : shoft-shelled turtles and hard-shelled turtles) supported by distinct morphological and embryological characters. Their origin is traced back up to the Cretaceous, along with a series of extinct forms, many of which being collectively known as Protostegidae. Fossil evidence show that at least five clades of marine turtles were roaming the seas at the end of the Cretaceous. In fact, chelonioids appeared during the first stages of the Early Cretaceous and quickly exploded to reach a high level of disparity at the lowermost part of the late Cretaceous. Therefore, the Mesozoic radiation of chelonioids must have happened during the "middle" Cretaceous (especially the Aptian-Albian interval). However this radiation is poorly understood as the phylogenetic relationships of marine turtles are not resolved yet. Bringing new data may help resolve these issues, and it is the exact reason why the genus Rhinochelys is being investigated. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (6 ULiège)
See detailImpact of Th17 population on xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease
Delens, Loïc ULiege; SERVAIS, Sophie ULiege; Vrancken, Louise ULiege et al

Poster (2017, February)

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See detailThe Bright and Dark Sides of elliptical galaxies
Biernaux, Judith ULiege

Poster (2017, January 29)

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See detailChildren’s engagement in physical education could be improved by stories and imagination.
De Sousa Morgado, Liliane ULiege; Jidovtseff, Boris ULiege

Poster (2017, January 27)

Introduction: The development of fundamental motor skills is essential during childhood and should be a learning outcome in the physical education (PE). With the children between 3 to 6 years old it could ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The development of fundamental motor skills is essential during childhood and should be a learning outcome in the physical education (PE). With the children between 3 to 6 years old it could be sometime difficult to get their attention and motivation during PE lessons. Teachers have to use a very adapted pedagogical approach in order to get all children’s engagement. Experience: The CEReKi is a research center of the University of Liège (Belgium) that has developed adapted activities where preschools children are playing and at the same time developing perceptuals and fundamental motor skills. From our field experience one of the more efficient ways to get children attention and participation is to introduce the activities with stories and imagination. Teachers from CEReKi are using fantasy in order to invite children into a funny world where everything could become possible like the "the never-never land of Peter Pan". The way of telling the story as well as the used characters (like the wolf) must be adapted to the age of the children. Critical analysis: From our experience, using stories and imagination is effective in increasing children‘s engagement during PE as it makes activities more fun and more enjoyable. Even if we don’t have any measurement on its effect, we are convinced that such approach improve children’s motor learning. However using stories and imagination with the children is neither a natural nor an easy thing for inexperienced teachers. The use of fantasy with the children should be introduces in the vocational training. Conclusions: With more than twenty years of experience, we believe that stories and imagination are powerful factors that makes physical activities funny and enjoyable for the children. Such strategy may positively enchase young people’s attitudes towards physical education and ultimately, physical activity participation. [less ▲]

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See detailElaboration of a water familiarization testing battery adapted for young children
Vandermeulen, Mary ULiege; Schiettecatte, Delphine; Delvaux, Anne ULiege et al

Poster (2017, January 27)

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See detailUse of complementary biophysical approaches to study the interactions of fatty acid hydroperoxides with biomimetic plant plasma membranes
Deboever, Estelle ULiege; Nasir, Mehmet Nail ULiege; Deleu, Magali ULiege et al

Poster (2017, January 20)

In the actual context, biopesticides have emerged as a main alternative to conventional agriculture1. Hence, elicitors are metabolites naturally produced by microorganisms, pathogenic or not, and plants ... [more ▼]

In the actual context, biopesticides have emerged as a main alternative to conventional agriculture1. Hence, elicitors are metabolites naturally produced by microorganisms, pathogenic or not, and plants which are able to induce the natural resistance of plants. Also, they have proved to be excellent candidates for biological control. In this context, the lipoxygenase pathway leads to the formation of fatty acid degradation products, called oxylipins, which appear to be crucial agents in plant defence mechanisms2,3. Moreover, with their broad spectrum of action and their possible inducibility, oxylipins appear to be promising candidates for their use as elicitors4. This work focuses on two hydroperoxy-derived oxylipins, the 13(S)-hydroperoxy-octadecadienoic acid (13-HPOD) and the 13(S)-hydroperoxy-octadecatrienoic acid (13-HPOT). The study of the interaction of such compounds with representative plant plasma membrane lipids is essential to understand plant resistance mechanisms. Several in silico and experimental techniques of biophysics showed that acyl-hydroperoxides have significant adsorption capacity and a strong affinity for model membranes. They may also penetrate biological membrane but no permeabilisation effect was observed in this work. Slight conformational differences seem to have a significant impact on their ability to interact with plant plasma membranes. Based on these results, further investigation of the interactions of fatty acids hydroperoxides, even more on the 9-forms, with plant plasma membranes and eventually in the presence of phytopathogenic species, would allow a better understanding of the innate immunity and, on the longer term, could lead to the development of new elicitors with biological mechanisms potentially independent of membrane protein receptors. [less ▲]

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See detailA persistent meteoric layer in Mars' atmosphere
Crismani; Schneider; Plane et al

Poster (2017, January 18)

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See detailAlexithymie et Ouverture Émotionnelle : effets positifs de la psychothérapie de groupe en hôpital de jour
Triffaux, Jean-Marc ULiege; Nasello, Julian ULiege; Servais, Catherine et al

Poster (2017, January 18)

À partir d’un échantillon de 192 patients, nous avons évalué l’effet de l’hospitalisation de jour sur l’alexithymie et l’ouverture émotionnelle. Ces deux variables ont été mesurées à travers deux échelles ... [more ▼]

À partir d’un échantillon de 192 patients, nous avons évalué l’effet de l’hospitalisation de jour sur l’alexithymie et l’ouverture émotionnelle. Ces deux variables ont été mesurées à travers deux échelles : la TAS-20 [1] et la DOE-36 [2]. A l’époque de l’« evidence based medicine », ces résultats permettent d’améliorer nos interventions thérapeutiques et d’envisager, de manière clinique et scientifique, la durée de séjour optimale de nos patients. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalyses des prédicteurs significatifs de l’alexithymie après une prise en charge en hôpital de jour
Nasello, Julian ULiege; Quertemont, Etienne ULiege; Blavier, Adelaïde ULiege et al

Poster (2017, January 18)

L’alexithymie, souvent considérée comme un trait de personnalité, serait-elle sensible aux traitements psychothérapeutiques dispensés en hôpital de jour ? Quelles en seraient les variables prédictives ... [more ▼]

L’alexithymie, souvent considérée comme un trait de personnalité, serait-elle sensible aux traitements psychothérapeutiques dispensés en hôpital de jour ? Quelles en seraient les variables prédictives ? Notre recherche a porté sur un échantillon de 192 participants hospitalisés, majoritairement représenté par des patients présentant des troubles de l’humeur (64,6%). Plusieurs variables ont été prises en considération : le sexe, l’âge, la durée d’hospitalisation (M séjour = 6 semaines), la médication, les dix échelles cliniques de base du « Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 » (MMPI-2), l’indice de négativité au traitement du MMPI-2 (échelle TRT) et le support social perçu (PSS) mesuré par la « Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support » (MSPSS). Les impacts positifs du support social perçu et les impacts négatifs de la non-adhésion au traitement se sont révélés être des prédicteurs particulièrement significatifs de l’alexithymie. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (2 ULiège)
See detailThree Types of Aurora observed by MAVEN/IUVS: Implications for Mars’ upper Atmosphere Energy Budget
Connour; Schneider; Jain et al

Poster (2017, January 17)

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See detailThe added value of plasma or urinary NGAL concentrations in clinical practice
Gregoire, Emilien ULiege; Claisse, Guillaume; GUIOT, Julien ULiege et al

Poster (2017, January 13)

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (4 ULiège)
See detailIron, zinc and manganese interaction within the frd3 Arabidopsis mutant
Scheepers, Maxime ULiege; Spielmann, Julien ULiege; Goormaghtigh, Erik et al

Poster (2017, January 12)

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See detailTracking the Subtle Mutations Thriving Host Sensing by the Plant Pathogen Streptomyces scabies
Deflandre, Benoit ULiege; Jourdan, Samuel ULiege; Francis, Isolde Maria et al

Poster (2017, January 12)

Le modèle de la pathogénicité végétale chez les Streptomyces, S. scabies est responsable de la maladie de la galle commune. La thaxtomine est la phytotoxine qui cause cette maladie. Il y a peu, la voie de ... [more ▼]

Le modèle de la pathogénicité végétale chez les Streptomyces, S. scabies est responsable de la maladie de la galle commune. La thaxtomine est la phytotoxine qui cause cette maladie. Il y a peu, la voie de production de la toxine a été découverte : celle-ci met en oeuvre un double mécanisme de régulation génétique. Cependant, certains aspects de la perception de son hôte par le pathogène sont toujours inconnus. Dans ce poster, nous proposons plusieurs hypothèses pour expliquer comment quelques éléments subtiles peuvent être à l'origine de ce mécanisme de pathogénicité. [less ▲]

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See detailMacroevolutionary patterns in sea breams, emperors and allies (Sparoidea, Acanthomorpha)
Santini, Francesco; Olivier, Damien ULiege; Frederich, Bruno ULiege

Poster (2017, January 07)

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See detailAttribution and recognition: The fluency heuristic in amnesia
Geurten, Marie ULiege; Willems, Sylvie ULiege

Poster (2017)

Fluency is one of many cues that are involved in memory decisions. To date, however, the extent to which fluency-based decisions are preserved in amnesia is not yet clear. In this study, we tested and ... [more ▼]

Fluency is one of many cues that are involved in memory decisions. To date, however, the extent to which fluency-based decisions are preserved in amnesia is not yet clear. In this study, we tested and found differences in how patients with amnesia (n = 8) and control participants (n = 16) use fluency when making recognition decisions (Experiment 1). Our results suggested that these differences could be due to changes in the readiness with which patients attribute the subjective feeling of fluency to pre-exposure when an alternative explanation is available (i.e., the perceptual quality of the item). Secondly, we explored the hypothesis that changes in attribution processes in patients with amnesia are explained by a decrease in contingency between processing fluency and previous occurrence of stimuli in patients’ daily lives, leading them to consider that fluency is not a relevant cue for memory (Experiment 2). Specifically, 42 healthy participants were put either in a condition where the positive contingency between fluent processing and previous encounters with an item was systematically confirmed (classic condition) or in a condition where the classical association between fluency and prior exposure was systematically reversed (reversed condition). Results indicated that participants more readily attribute fluency to the alternative external source than to past experience in the reversed condition than in the classic condition, mimicking the pattern of results shown by participants with amnesia in Experiment 1. Implications of these findings are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-regulation in addiction: The dual-process model in emerging adulthood
Hoffmann, Joelle; Glowacz, Fabienne ULiege; Schmits, Emilie ULiege

Poster (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (1 ULiège)
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See detailImpact of vibroseismic underwater sound on the behaviour of baleen whales
Tougaard, Jakob; Luke, Klaus; Siebert, Ursula et al

Poster (2017)

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See detailStudies on sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) stranded on the coast of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany in 2016.
Piatkowski, Uwe; Wohlsein, Peter; Van Neer, Abbo et al

Poster (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (2 ULiège)
See detailA new solar reference spectrum from 165 to 3088 nm
Damé, Luc; Meftah, Mustapha; Bolsée, David et al

Poster (2017)

Since April 5, 2008 and until February 15, 2017 the SOLAR/SOLSPEC spectro-radiometer on the International Space Station performed accurate measurements of Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) from the far ... [more ▼]

Since April 5, 2008 and until February 15, 2017 the SOLAR/SOLSPEC spectro-radiometer on the International Space Station performed accurate measurements of Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) from the far ultraviolet to the infrared (165 nm to 3088 nm). These measurements are of primary importance for a better understanding of solar physics and of the impact of solar variability on climate (via Earth's atmospheric photochemistry). In particular, a new reference solar spectrum is established covering most of the unusual solar cycle 24 from minimum in 2008 to maximum. Temporal variability in the UV (165 to 400 nm) is presented in several wavelengths bands. These results are possible thanks to revised engineering corrections, improved calibrations and new procedures to account for thermal and aging advanced corrections. Uncertainties on these measurements are evaluated and compare favorably with other instruments. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurobiologische Korrelate von exekutiver Kontrolle im alternden Gehirn
Overhage, Sina; Eickhoff, Simon; Jockwitz, Christiane et al

Poster (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (1 ULiège)
See detailGenomic prediction of a PRRS-vaccinated training population to predict host response to PRRS virus-only or PRRS virus/PCV2b co-infection
Dunkelberger, Jenelle R; Serão, Nicolas VL; Niederweder, Megan et al

Poster (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (1 ULiège)
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See detailStudy of virus-like particles of human papillomavirus in capillary electrophoresis
Bettonville, Virginie ULiege; Nicol, Jérôme; Furst, Tania et al

Poster (2017)

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See detailStructural characterization of protein using an enzymatic reactor
Grifnée, Elodie ULiege

Poster (2017)

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See detailFeedback effect on children's global metacognitive judgments
Geurten, Marie ULiege; Meulemans, Thierry ULiege

Poster (2017)

In three experiments, we investigated whether the feedback effect on the accuracy of children’s metacognitive judgments results from an improvement in monitoring processes or the use of the Anchoring-and ... [more ▼]

In three experiments, we investigated whether the feedback effect on the accuracy of children’s metacognitive judgments results from an improvement in monitoring processes or the use of the Anchoring-and-Adjustment heuristic. The purpose of Experiment 1 was to investigate whether 4-, 6-, and 8-year-old children are able to use feedback to increase the accuracy of their memory judgments. To do so, children in three age groups were divided into two experimental conditions (feedback or no feedback). After studying a list of associated words, participants were instructed to predict their future memory performance, and then they were asked to recall as many items as possible. Next, half of the participants were given concrete feedback about the accuracy of their global prediction. Once the feedback was provided, all children were presented with another set of associated word pairs and the procedure was repeated. Our results revealed that children’s predictions were more accurate in the feedback than in the no feedback condition, indicating that getting feedback about the accuracy of their judgments had a positive influence on their subsequent memory predictions. In Experiment 2, we sought to determine whether young children are able to use the Anchoring-and-Adjustment heuristic to guide their global memory predictions. For this purpose, 4-, 6-, and 8-year-old children were divided into three experimental conditions depending on the anchor that was provided (high, low, or no anchor). Data indicated that children’s predictions were higher in the high than in the low anchor condition, suggesting that children in all age groups adjusted their prospective judgment depending on the random anchor they were given. Finally, the primary aim of Experiment 3 was to determine whether the feedback effect can serve as an external anchor for children’s global prospective judgments. To do so, children (aged 4, 6, and 8 years) were presented with two memory tasks that differed in terms of difficulty. Participants were randomly assigned to an anchoring (high, low, or no anchor) and a feedback (feedback or no feedback) condition to obtain a balanced experimental design. Results showed that children in the feedback condition adjusted their predictions toward the feedback, regardless of the task’s difficulty. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that external information provided by feedback is used as an anchor for judgment. This interpretation is strengthened by the correlation found between the two scores computed to assess participants’ susceptibility to anchoring and feedback effects, which indicates that children who are more sensitive to the anchoring effect are also more sensitive to the feedback effect. [less ▲]

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See detailAround the fireplace: heat exposure and adhesive alteration
Cnuts, Dries ULiege; Tomasso, Sonja ULiege; Rots, Veerle ULiege

Poster (2017)

Currently, there is no agreement about the timing of the habitual use of fire in the Palaeolithic. Some researchers (Roebroeks and Villa, 2011) situate the control of fire in North-western Europe around ... [more ▼]

Currently, there is no agreement about the timing of the habitual use of fire in the Palaeolithic. Some researchers (Roebroeks and Villa, 2011) situate the control of fire in North-western Europe around 400ka and question the early claims of fire structures (before 400 ka) since these traces could also be produced by natural events. The only other available line of direct evidence, strike-a-lights, appear only to occur later in the Palaeolithic record (Stapert and Johansen, 1999; Sorensen et al., 2014; Rots, 2015). The lack of convincing evidence has forced researchers to use indirect evidence as adhesives to estimate the timing of control of fire. It is assumed that a synthetic adhesive like birch tar, which was already in use from at least 120ka (Mazza et al., 2006), cannot be produced without an extensive pyro-technological knowledge. The link between fire control and adhesive technology is evident since fire is required for a range of activities related to hafting technology: the production of birch bark, mixing of resin with other materials, dehafting of stone tools. Moreover, archaeological evidence indicates that dehafted stone tools may have been thrown into the fire when discarded. Once the tools are buried, they may be subjected to heat from an overlying fireplace. The effect of heat exposure on these fragile organic substances has never been investigated, and it is hypothesised that this might be a possible explanation for the rare survival of these adhesives in the archaeological record. Our study aims at monitoring the effect of heat exposure by combustion on a range of experimental compound adhesives on flint tools. The results of the combustion experiments are presented and it is demonstrated that the vertically transferred combustion heat is responsible for the loss of adhering adhesives. A correlation between the degree of loss and the specific adhesive mixture could be observed. The combustion experiment also leads to a wide range of accidental residues deposited on the stone tools. Our results stress the importance of identifying the processes that might be responsible for the formation or degradation of residues adhering to a stone tool surface. [less ▲]

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See detailReactive extrusion of pharmaceutical grade PLLA
Regibeau, Nicolas ULiege; Tilkin, Rémi ULiege; Grandfils, Christian ULiege et al

Poster (2017)

During the 20th century, degradable aliphatic polyesters have undergone fast and dynamic developments. Nowadays, these materials can be found in several areas of human activities. Originally there have ... [more ▼]

During the 20th century, degradable aliphatic polyesters have undergone fast and dynamic developments. Nowadays, these materials can be found in several areas of human activities. Originally there have been first designed for the pharmaceutical and medical fields, in particular in surgery and for drug delivery systems. In these domains, polymers are synthesized according to a batch procedure due to the low capacity needed. This work is dedicated to the optimization of a continuous synthesis of pharmaceutical grade polyesters (e.g. poly-L-lactide, PLLA) by reactive extrusion using a twin screws extruder. This equipment presents several advantages compared to batch reactor such as: absence of solvent, high degree of mixing, easiness of scale-up, and rapid continuous synthesis. PLLA synthesis by reactive extrusion has been performed adopting a co-rotating twin-screws extruder (diameter=11 mm and L/D ratio=40). A highly active catalyst must be used to reach the target conversion due to the limited residence time. Tin octoate, approved by US Food and Drugs Administration, has been used alone as catalyst considering a catalyst / monomer molar ratio of 1/5000. A polyethylene glycol has been adopted as initiator. 1H.NMR and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) have been adopted to monitor the conversion rate of the monomer and to analyse the mean molecular weights and the corresponding polydispersity. Static mechanical tests have also carried out to assess the influence of residual monomer within the polymer. Our optimization study has highlighted that the main challenging aspects were the control of the reaction atmosphere and of the residence time. In the first case, even presence in trace water can competitively initiate the polymerization, but also promote hydrolysis. In order to reach a high monomer conversion (≥ 99 %), the residence time has to be well controlled and extended. This latter parameter is particularly affected by the screw configuration and the use of the protic initiator. In particular, the screw configuration was based on previous studies dedicated to the synthesis of polyesters by reactive extrusion [1, 2]. After synthesis, post-processing step was realized in order to reduce the monomer residue. Once optimized we have succeeded to reach in a reproducible way high molecular weight PLLA (typically in a range of 50 to 100 KDa) with a high monomer conversion (>96 %) on a time scale of some minutes. Post-polymerization has successfully decreased the residual monomer below 1%. In conclusion, this work provides a continuous and robust process to synthesize pharmaceutical grade PLLA by reactive extrusion. References : [less ▲]

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See detailRewiring of porcine mRNA and miRNA networks in response to selection of residual feed intake
Beiki, Hamid; Schroyen, Martine ULiege; Rakshandeh, Anoosh et al

Poster (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (1 ULiège)
See detailDevelopment and integration of entomopathogenic fungi for crops protection in Democratic Republic of Congo
Fingu Mabola, Junior Corneille ULiege; Bawin, Thomas; Nsevolo Miankeba, Papy et al

Poster (2017)

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DR Congo) has enormous agricultural potentialities likely to contribute to its economic development. However, the sector is characterized by significant yield losses ... [more ▼]

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DR Congo) has enormous agricultural potentialities likely to contribute to its economic development. However, the sector is characterized by significant yield losses due notably to the pressure of pests. In response to this situation, most farmers use synthetic chemical pesticides, despite the problems of residues on harvested materials and their widely documented side effects on biodiversity. Up to now, efforts are made to promote healthy farming in the long term, taking into account both economic and environmental aspects. According to this principals, pest management is now achieved through the combination of agronomic, biological and physical means, chemical control being the last resort if necessary. Considering the context of DR Congo, biological control remains by far the least developed of all means in pest management. This is due to the lack of technical equipment. Nevertheless, compared to entomophagous macroorganisms, microorganisms offer the advantage of not requiring substantial resources for their integration into agriculture. This is notably the case for entomopathogenic fungi (EF): in addition to the fact that they may be multiplied on readily available substrates, their abundance in nature makes it possible to isolate new, more efficient strains with more or less marked selectivity. However, very little research on EF is carried out in this country. The present study aims to integrate these biological control agents into the pest management strategy in DR Congo. This research project will focus on two approaches: (1) evaluation of the genetic diversity of EF strains in DR Congo, which will lead to the establishment of a reference collection; and (2) screening of potential candidates for biopesticide development. Researches will be carried out on the southwestern part of the country, focusing on insect cadavers and soil samples from cultivated areas. Pure strains will be isolated on synthetic culture media then identified according to their morphological, physiological and molecular traits. Biological tests including virulence and effectiveness under various environmental conditions in laboratory will be carried out against the most important agricultural pests to be determined following a field monitoring. Finally, culture trials of EF with locally available resources at low cost will be conducted to encourage the adoption of the technology. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of agitation rate on oxydative degradation of monoethanolamine
Benkoussas, Hana ULiege; Léonard, Grégoire ULiege; Kerbachi, Rabah

Poster (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 110 (71 ULiège)
See detailIncidence of MAGED2 on cell cycle after a camptothecin treatment
Trussart, Charlotte ULiege; Pirlot, Céline; Piette, Jacques ULiege et al

Poster (2017)

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See detailÉtude de la spécificité d’épreuves langagières chez des enfants présentant une dyspraxie verbale (DV) vs un trouble phonologique (TP)
Masson, Pauline ULiege; Martinez Perez, Trecy ULiege

Poster (2017)

Malgré une augmentation de la recherche sur la dyspraxie verbale, l’évaluation de ce trouble langagier reste problématique. La littérature propose une variété de critères pour le diagnostic de la ... [more ▼]

Malgré une augmentation de la recherche sur la dyspraxie verbale, l’évaluation de ce trouble langagier reste problématique. La littérature propose une variété de critères pour le diagnostic de la dyspraxie verbale, cependant la majorité des caractéristiques cliniques sont également partagées avec les troubles phonologiques (Davis & Velleman, 2000 ; Murray et al., 2015). L’objectif de cette recherche est de déterminer des épreuves qui permettent de différencier une dyspraxie verbale et un trouble phonologique. Nous avons exploré les marqueurs les plus couramment utilisés dans la littérature : l’imprécision des productions phonologiques et l’intelligibilité réduite (Aziz et al., 2010), l’inconstance des erreurs (Forrest, 2003 ; Tubul-Lavy, 2012), la prosodie inappropriée (Shriberg et al., 2003) et la lenteur d’articulation (Shriberg, 2013). Nous avons récolté des données auprès de deux groupes d’enfants francophones présentant une dyspraxie verbale (N=12) ou un trouble phonologique (N=12). Nos deux groupes sont appariés sur le score du QI non verbal, le niveau de compréhension orale et le niveau socio-économique. Les résultats de cette recherche mettent en évidence quatre mesures dont les valeurs de sensibilité/spécificité sont entre acceptables (>80%) et bonnes (>90%) : les pourcentages de réponses correctes et de consonnes correctes à une épreuve de dénomination d'images ; la stabilité des productions dans une épreuve de récit sur images (mots présentés à trois reprises) ; et la vitesse d’articulation pour la série diadocosinésique /pataka/. Pour ces quatre mesures, les résultats montrent que la dyspraxie verbale et le trouble phonologique se situent sur un continuum de sévérité (la dyspraxie verbale entrainant des manifestations plus sévères que le trouble phonologique). Ces résultats seront discutés lors de la session poster. [less ▲]

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See detail[18F]UCB-H RADIOTRACER AS A TOOL TO UNDERSTAND THE ROLE OF THE SV2A PROTEIN
Serrano Navacerrada, Maria Elisa ULiege; Becker, Guillaume ULiege; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege et al

Poster (2017)

Background: SV2A is the most studied isoform of the Synaptic Vesicle 2 proteins, which are involved in the synaptic vesicle trafficking, being important both in normal as in pathological process (1, 2 ... [more ▼]

Background: SV2A is the most studied isoform of the Synaptic Vesicle 2 proteins, which are involved in the synaptic vesicle trafficking, being important both in normal as in pathological process (1, 2). Until now, only one study in vivo has been reported, showing a reduction of SV2A levels in the epilepsy (3). [18F]UCB-H was developed like a current tool to study the role of SV2A with in vivo techniques (4, 5), and as a tool in clinical investigations. The objective of this research was to evaluate the radiotracer specificity to this isoform comparing with the others, through a competition assay in rats with ex-vivo autoradiography and mPET imaging. Methods: Forty male Sprague-Dawley were used in ex-vivo autoradiography experiments (N=20) and in microPET imaging (N=20). Animals were pre-treated 30 minutes before the injection of [18F]UCB-H with a dose IP either of vehicle, Keppra (SV2A ligand), UCB068 (SV2B ligand) or UCB054 (SV2C ligand). Ex-vivo autoradiography was carried out 5 minutes after radiotracer injection while mPET images were acquiring with a dynamic scanner of 1 hour. Standard Uptake Value (SUV) and Distribution Volume (VT) were calculated and the correlation between both parameters was determined. Results: In ex-vivo autoradiography, ANOVA of two-ways showed statistical significant differences in brain uptake of [18F]UCB-H among the groups pretreated with Keppra or the ligand for SV2B and the control group. Regarding mPET data, statistical significant differences were found between the group injected with keppra and the rest of groups. Pearson Correlation between SUV and VT was strong, with a value of 0.955. Conclusion: Even if a considerable affinity between the ligands UCB068 and UCB054, and the receptor for the isoform SV2A exists, it is only detected during the first 5 minutes (ex-vivo technique), being certainly due to a nonspecific binding. This binding is not strong enough to show a direct competition with the radiotracer during a mPET acquisition. These results allow us to conclude that [18F]UCB-H is a suitable radiotracer for the imaging of the isoform SV2A in vivo, allowing us the clinical study about the molecular base of a disease with a high population impact, like the epilepsy. 1) Van Vliet et al., 2009. Epilepsia 2) Crèvecœur et al., 2013. BMC Neurosci. 3) Finnema et al., 2016; Sci Transl Med. 4) Bretin et al., 2013.EJNMMI Res 5) Bretin et al., 2015.Mol Imaging Biol [less ▲]

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See detailContribution of macrophages to myxomatous valve disease
Hulin, Alexia ULiege; Potter, Sarah; Kim, Andrew et al

Poster (2017)

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See detailIdentifying tissue specific gene expression using RNAseq data from multiple porcine tissues
Huang, Jianzhen; Schroyen, Martine ULiege; Gabler, Nick et al

Poster (2017)

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See detailNitrous oxide dynamic in sea ice
Kotovitch, Marie ULiege; Fripiat, François ULiege; Deman, Florian et al

Poster (2017)

Fluctuations in greenhouse gases (GHGs) concentration alter the energetic budget of the climate system. There is high confidence that natural systems related to snow, ice and frozen ground are affected ... [more ▼]

Fluctuations in greenhouse gases (GHGs) concentration alter the energetic budget of the climate system. There is high confidence that natural systems related to snow, ice and frozen ground are affected. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of the potent GHG naturally present in the atmosphere, but witch has seen his concentration growing since industrial era. N2O has a lifetime in the atmosphere of 114 years and a global warming potential 300 time higher than that of CO2. Yet, there are still large uncertainties and gaps in the understanding of the cycle of this compound through the ocean and particularly in sea ice. Sources and sinks of N2O are therefore still poorly quantified. The main processes (except the transport processes) involved in the N2O cycle within the aquatic environment are nitrification and denitrification. To date, only one study by Randall et al. 2012 present N2O measurements in sea ice. Randall et al. pointed out that sea ice formation and melt has the potential to generate sea-air or air-sea fluxes of N2O, respectively. Study on ammonium oxidation and anaerobic bacterial cultures shows that N2O production can potentially occur in sea ice. Denitrification can act as a sink or a source of N2O. In strictly anaerobic conditions, N2O is removed by denitrification. However, denitrification can also occur in presence of O2 at trace level concentrations (<0.2 mg L-1), and in these conditions there is a large N2O production. Recent observations of significant nitrification in Antarctic sea ice shed a new light on nitrogen cycle within sea ice. It has been suggested that nitrification supplies up to 70% of nitrate assimilated within Antarctic spring sea ice. Corollary, production of N2O, a by-product of nitrification, can potentially be significant. This was recently confirmed in Antarctic land fast ice in McMurdo Sound, where N2O release to the atmosphere was estimated to 4 µmol.m-2.yr-1. This assessment is probably an underestimate since it only accounts for dissolved N2O while a significant amount of N2O is likely to occur in the gaseous form like N2, O2 and Ar. This poster address the issue related to the production of N2O within sympagic microorganisms. What process is dominant and how much N2O is produced? The determination of the isotopic composition of N2O using cavity enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy technique (Off-axis ICOS) will allow us to determine the origin of these processes. It will be based on the relative isotope abundance values and site preference data in previous studies. [less ▲]

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See detailIN VIVO STUDY OF THE SV2A PROTEIN IN AN EPILEPTIC RAT MODEL
Serrano Navacerrada, Maria Elisa ULiege; Becker, Guillaume ULiege; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege et al

Poster (2017)

Introduction Epilepsy is one of the commonest neurological disorders, affecting more than 60 million people worldwide [1]. New and effective antiepileptic drugs mainly target the SV2A protein [2] but its ... [more ▼]

Introduction Epilepsy is one of the commonest neurological disorders, affecting more than 60 million people worldwide [1]. New and effective antiepileptic drugs mainly target the SV2A protein [2] but its actual role is still largely unknown. [18F]UCB-H was developed as a tool to study in vivo the brain expression of this isoform [3, 4]. Due to the fact that only post-mortem studies were reported so far [5] the present pilot study was undertaken in order to evaluate for the first time in vivo in rats the SV2A expression in the validated Kaïnic Acid (KA) epilepsy model [6]. Methods Three male Sprague-Dawley were used, one injected with saline (Sham) and two with multiple KA systemic injections (5mg/kg x 3) [9]. SV2A brain levels were estimated at day 75, when spontaneous seizures started to appear. Animals were anesthetized (2.5 to 3 % isoflurane), and scanned for 1 hour with [18F]UCB-H (41 ± 5 MBq IV tail vein) in a Focus 120 microPET system and with MRI (9.4T Agilent, anatomical T2). Coregistration was done with PMOD 3.6 software. Data were expressed in SUV and areas under the curve were calculated for the different regions. Results [18F]UCB-H microPET images showed an important reduction (20-30%) for SV2A after KA injections mainly localized in amygdala, hippocampus, lateral parietal association cortex and cingulate cortex. The rest of the brain was globally unchanged. MRI revealed atrophy and inflammation in amygdala and hippocampus. Conclusions These preliminary results in KA treated rats presenting spontaneous seizures showed that [18F]UCB-H microPET was able to detect important reductions for the SV2A proteins in relevant regions for epilepsy [5]. Accordingly to this, we can infer that the KA model in rats deserves for further development and validation as a tool for the study of epilepsy. [18F]UCB-H appears as a valuable tool to follow in vivo SV2A proteins through longitudinal protocols and in turn to better understand its actual role in epilepsy. References/acknowledgements This work was funded by University of Liège, F.R.S.-FNRS, Walloon Region and UCB Pharma. Alain Plenevaux is research director from F.R.S.-FNRS. [1] Alexopoulos, Epileptology, 2004 [2] Hamann et al., Eur J Pharmacol, 2008 [3] Bretin et al., Molecular Imaging and Biology, 2015 [4] Warnock et al., J Nucl Med., 2014 [5] Wang et al., J Mol Neurosci., 2014 [6] Hellier et al., Epilepsy Res., 1998 [less ▲]

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See detailIN VIVO STUDY OF THE SV2A PROTEIN IN THE KAINIC ACID EPILEPSY RAT MODEL
Serrano Navacerrada, Maria Elisa ULiege; Becker, Guillaume ULiege; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege et al

Poster (2017)

Introduction Epilepsy is one of the commonest neurological disorders [1]. Antiepileptic drugs mainly target the SV2A protein [2] but its actual role is still largely unknown. [18F]UCB-H was developed to ... [more ▼]

Introduction Epilepsy is one of the commonest neurological disorders [1]. Antiepileptic drugs mainly target the SV2A protein [2] but its actual role is still largely unknown. [18F]UCB-H was developed to study in vivo SV2A brain proteins [3, 4]. The present pilot study was undertaken to evaluate for the first time in vivo in rats SV2A expression in the Kaïnic Acid (KA) epilepsy model [5]. Although this model is well studied in mice, few reports were devoted to rats. Imaging-wise, rats are very interesting thanks to a bigger brain size (reduction of the partial volume effect). Methods Three male Sprague-Dawley were used, one injected with saline and two with multiple KA injections (3 x 5mg/kg) [6]. 75 days later, when spontaneous seizures started to appear, microPET (Focus 120 ) was performed under isoflurane anesthesia (2.5-3 % in air) for 1 hour with [18F]UCB-H (41 ± 5 MBq IV tail vein) followed by MRI (9.4T Agilent, anatomical T2). Coregistration was done with PMOD 3.6 software. Data were expressed as SUV and areas under the curve were calculated for the different regions. Results [18F]UCB-H microPET images showed an important reduction (20-30%) for SV2A after KA injections mainly localized in amygdala, hippocampus, lateral parietal association cortex and cingulate cortex. The rest of the brain was globally unchanged. MRI revealed atrophy and inflammation in amygdala and hippocampus. Conclusions These preliminary results obtained in KA treated rats showed that [18F]UCB-H was able to detect important modifications for SV2A in relevant regions for epilepsy and appears as a valuable tool to follow in vivo SV2A through longitudinal studies. KA model in rats deserves for further development and validation as a tool for the study of epilepsy. [less ▲]

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