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See detailImpact of the depth on bacterial diversity in an agricultural soil
Stroobants, Aurore ULg; Degrune, Florine ULg; Lambert, Christophe et al

Poster (2013, February 08)

Bacteria are the most abundant and diverse microorganisms in soils. They play an important role in soil formation, contribute to plant nutrition and are involved in various processes in agroecosystems ... [more ▼]

Bacteria are the most abundant and diverse microorganisms in soils. They play an important role in soil formation, contribute to plant nutrition and are involved in various processes in agroecosystems such as nutrient cycling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the depth on bacterial diversity and quantity in an agricultural soil. Samples was collected on May 2011 and May 2012 at three different depths : 10, 25 and 45 centimeters. The quantity of total bacteria was measured by real time PCR and the analysis of the diversity was performed by the high throughput sequencing technology. Results obtained by these methods show that the biomass and the bacterial quantity and diversity (Shannon index) decrease with the depth, particularly at 45 centimeters. The biomass is, in average, 6.5 fold less important at 45 cm than at 10 cm and the quantity is 17 fold lower at 45 cm than at 10 cm. Our results also indicate that many taxa, such as Betaprotebacteria, Deltaproterobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Burkholderiales are influenced by the depth. The results will be presented in more details on the poster. [less ▲]

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See detailIs ultra-short cold ischemia the key to IBDL avoidance in DCD-LT?
DETRY, Olivier ULg; DE ROOVER, Arnaud ULg; Ledinh, Hieu et al

Poster (2013, February 08)

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See detailSurvey of rice diseases in three regions in Madagascar
Razanakoto Mamiharisoa, Lea; De Clerck, Caroline ULg; Zalmine, F. et al

Poster (2013, February 08)

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See detailTowards a characterisation of iron oxide-rich rocks used during the Archaic period on the Costa Arreica in Northern Chile
Salomon, Hélène ULg; Coquinot, Yvan; Salazar, Diego et al

Poster (2013, February 07)

Iron or manganese oxide rich rocks were constantly and intensively used by hunter- gatherers from around 300 kya. Nonetheless, few is none concerning the supply in raw ferruginous materials. The mine San ... [more ▼]

Iron or manganese oxide rich rocks were constantly and intensively used by hunter- gatherers from around 300 kya. Nonetheless, few is none concerning the supply in raw ferruginous materials. The mine San Ramón 15 in northern part of the Chilean coast reveals an exceptional evidence of the extraction of iron and probably manganese oxide rich materials by groups of hunters-fishers-gatherers. Two extraction phases were determined during the excavation of the mine trench: the oldest one during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition (11000-8000 cal. BP) and the second one from 4300 cal. BP. A rich set of lithic pounding stones and hammer stones were recorded in the mine refus. The mine trench follows a various meters wide lenticular vein in the granodioritic bedrock from the Jurassic. The vein is principally made of hydrothermal pyrolusite, magnetite and goethite which are extremely hard materials and yellow to brown and black. Thus we suppose that the prehispanic miners intensively extracted a peculiar part of the vein, between the hard magnetite and the bedrock, so that few evidence of the material extracted in the mine were recorded. Our investigations focus on the determination of the characteristics of the quite messing materials which were extracted and we try to identify the following phases of transformation and utilisation. In order to address these issues, we sampled and document the lithology of the vein and of the numerous geological formations which provide iron rich materials in the neighbourhood. Furthermore, fragments of iron oxides from the mine refus, as well as red or black residues on tools from divers Archaic sites in the area (hammer stones in the mine, lithic weapons, grinding-stones and shells in the shellmiddens and rock-shelters) in order to compare their mineralogical and geochemical composition. [less ▲]

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See detailPhenotypic and genetic variability of methane emissions and milk fatty acid contents of Walloon Holstein dairy cows
Vanrobays, Marie-Laure ULg; Kandel, Purna Bhadra ULg; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg et al

Poster (2013, February 07)

There is a growing interest in reducing methane (CH4) emissions from enteric fermentation of dairy cows because these emissions contribute to climate change and represent losses of gross energy intake for ... [more ▼]

There is a growing interest in reducing methane (CH4) emissions from enteric fermentation of dairy cows because these emissions contribute to climate change and represent losses of gross energy intake for cows. Milk fatty acid (FA) profile is influenced by rumen fermentations. The aim of this study was to estimate phenotypic and genetic variability of enteric CH4 emissions of dairy cows and FA contents of milk. CH4 emissions (g/d) and milk FA contents are predicted from milk mid-infrared (MIR) spectra based on calibration equations developed by Vanlierde et al. (2013) and Soyeurt et al. (2011), respectively. Data included 161,681 records from 22,642 cows in 489 herds. Genetic parameters of MIR CH4 emissions and 7 groups of FA contents in milk were estimated for Walloon Holstein cows in first parity using bivariate (CH4 emission with a FA trait) random regression test-day models. Saturated FA presented higher genetic correlations with MIR CH4 production than unsaturated FA (0.25 vs. 0.10). Genetic correlations with MIR CH4 emissions were higher for short-(SC) and medium-chain (MC) FA (0.24 and 0.23, respectively) than for long-chain (LC) FA (0.13). Phenotypic correlations between MIR CH4 emissions and SC and MC FA were also higher than those between MIR CH4 emissions and LC FA (0.20 vs. -0.08). Finally, results showed that MIR milk FA profile and MIR CH4 emissions are correlated emphasizing indirect link between milk FA and CH4 emissions through rumen metabolism. [less ▲]

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See detailNeanderthals see red : production of red powder in the Late Mousterian in Ormesson, France
Salomon, Hélène ULg; Geurten, Stéphanie; Bodu, Pierre et al

Poster (2013, February 07)

Les Bossats, near Ormesson, is a newly discovered late Mousterian site dated around 47.000 B.P. by thermoluminescence. The archaeological level, fossilized by loess, revealed a rich industry based on the ... [more ▼]

Les Bossats, near Ormesson, is a newly discovered late Mousterian site dated around 47.000 B.P. by thermoluminescence. The archaeological level, fossilized by loess, revealed a rich industry based on the discoide mode, associated with numerous fragments of red iron-rich rocks. The geological sources were identified by means of SEM-EDX, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, PIXE and by petrographical observation of thin sections. The past mechanical and morphological modifications of the pigment blocks were characterized by macro-photography, microscopy and topographical micro- measures of the used surfaces. It was thus possible to demonstrate that the colouring materials were selected in the neighbouring by the Neanderthals. Fourteen blocks and fragments show different use wears such as facets, grooves and scars. The Neanderthals implemented numerous techniques in order to produce preferentially red powder. The archaeological remains reveal an organized and versatile processing sequence of red ferruginous materials. During the late Mousterian a great phenomenon in expansion in western Europe is remarkable by the much wider exploitation of mineral red and black materials corresponding to technical modifications and divers utilizations under development. [less ▲]

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See detailPrévalence des cas de lymphadénite granulomateuse sous‐maxillaire chez des porcs abattus en Belgique
Vyt, Philip; Denoël, Joseph ULg; Cassart, Dominique ULg et al

Poster (2013, February 06)

In pigs the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) causes granulomatous lymphadenitis. Carcasses with such lesions must be detected, as parts of the affected carcasses and organs have to be condemned. These ... [more ▼]

In pigs the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) causes granulomatous lymphadenitis. Carcasses with such lesions must be detected, as parts of the affected carcasses and organs have to be condemned. These nontuberculous mycobacteria are opportunistic pathogens which have acquired an increasing importance in public health in recent decades due to their ability to cause lung diseases, lymphadenitis in children and systemic infections in immunocompromised patients ‐ even if the potential risk of infection of an immunocompromised person by MAC in the consumption of undercooked pork still has to be determined. The first objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of submandibular granulomatous lymphadenitis in pigs slaughtered in Belgium. Between August 2010 and September 2011, 16,211 carcasses were inspected by the same veterinarian in 2 slaughterhouses – one in Flanders, the other in Wallonia. Eighty‐six suspected cases of submandibular granulomatous lymphadenitis (0.53% of pigs; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.42‐0.65%) were identified, collected and submitted to histopathological (Ziehl‐Neelsen and haematoxylin‐eosin staining) and bacteriological (culture, PCR, molecular typing) tests. The second objective of the study was to characterize lesions and to identify the relative importance of MAC and Rhodococcus equi to explain the lesions. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) was isolated from 6 lymph nodes (7.0%; 95% CI: 2.6‐14.6%) and Rhodococcus equi from 45 (52.3%; 95% CI: 41.3‐63.2%). The final objective of the study consisted in farm investigation to evaluate the possible source of contamination of pigs by MAH. Potential sources such as sawdust, water, wild birds and/or cattle were identified. [less ▲]

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See detailModeling the mutation of socio-ecosystems in Central Africa
Gillet, Pauline ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg

Poster (2013, February)

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See detailPrevalentie van eenzaamheid bij 65-plussers in België
Vermeulen, Bram; Maggi, Patrick ULg; Delye, Samuel ULg et al

Poster (2013, February)

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See detailScan for selective sweeps associated with muscular devolpment in Belgian Blue beef cattle
Druet, Tom ULg; Ahariz, Naïma ULg; Cambisano, Nadine ULg et al

Poster (2013, February)

The Belgian Blue beef cattle is well known for its double muscling phenotype resulting from fixation of a deletion in the myostatin gene. Since this fixation, further intensive selection for muscular ... [more ▼]

The Belgian Blue beef cattle is well known for its double muscling phenotype resulting from fixation of a deletion in the myostatin gene. Since this fixation, further intensive selection for muscular development has been particularly succesful. This response to selection might be due to fixation of more genetic variants increasing muscular development. In the present study, we search for selective sweeps in the Belgian Blue genome which might result from the fixation of such variants. To that end we used data from 593 sires genotyped with the BovineHD SNP array. In addition, we used the Belgian Blue dual purpose and the Holstein breeds as controls. We first performed scans for regions of complete homozygosity resulting from fixation. Large fixed regions were found around major genes known to be fixed in the Belgian Blue cattle breed (MSTN, PLAG1 and MC1R) but no other regions of the same magnitude was found. Among the smaller identified regions, only few of them were unique to the Belgian Blue breed. Statistical tests based on long range haplotype information were also implemented, revealing large regions in the genome of reduced haplotype homozygosity specific to the Belgian Blue breed. Some of these regions corresponded to known major genes (MSTN, roan locus, PLAG1 or MC1R) while other regions were new. To determine whether these regions might be the result of selection for muscular development, we performed association studies for muscular development. None of the identified QTL matched with the regions of reduced haplotype homozygosity and the largest QTLs did not presented evidence of strong selective sweeps. These results suggest that the response to selection for muscular development in Belgian Blue beef cattle is probably the result of polygenic selection. [less ▲]

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See detailComparaison of the allergenicity of the zymogen and mature form of Der p 3.
Bouaziz, Ahlem ULg

Poster (2013, February)

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See detailUnravelling the roles of lysine acetylation by Elp3 during inner ear development
Mateo Sanchez, Susana ULg; Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Laguesse, Sophie ULg et al

Poster (2013, January 28)

The inner ear is composed of the vestibular system that controls balance, and the cochlea, which is dedicated to hearing. In both parts of the inner ear, sensory epithelia comprise supporting cells ... [more ▼]

The inner ear is composed of the vestibular system that controls balance, and the cochlea, which is dedicated to hearing. In both parts of the inner ear, sensory epithelia comprise supporting cells surrounding the sensory hair cells. These cells bear at their apical surface a staircase-structured bundle, consisting of multiple rows of actin-based stereocilia and a single tubulin-based kinocilium. This hair bundle allows the transduction from mechanical stimuli, initiated by sound or gravitational changes, to electrical signals that will then be transmitted by neurons from the spiral ganglion (innervating hair cells of the cochlea) or the vestibular ganglion. The inner ear organogenesis requires a tightly regulated transcriptional program that can be affected by post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications among which lysine acetylation. Given the importance of acetylation homeostasis in controlling developmental processes, we planned to investigate its role in inner ear formation and focused our attention on Elp3 acetyl-transferase, a member of the Elongator complex recently implicated in neurogenesis. To determine the role of Elp3 in the inner ear, we first determine the spatio-temporal pattern of ELp3 mRNA expression and showed that it was expressed in the entire early otocyst at E11.5 and persisted later in the sensory epithelium of the cochlea (the organ of Corti), in the spiral ganglion, in the stria vascularis and in the vestibule. To unravel in vivo functions of Elp3 in the inner ear, we have generated conditional knock-out mice (Elp3 cKO). We submitted these mice to a battery of vestibular testing (i.e. stereotyped circling ambulation, head bobbing, retropulsion, and absence of reaching response in the tail-hanging test) and found significant abnormalities. Besides, compared to wild-type mice, the auditory brain stem response of Elp3 cKO indicated that these mice are severely deaf. At the cellular level, we did not found any structural abnormalities nor cell patterning impairments that could explain deafness or balance dysfunction in Elp3 cKO mice. However, we detected some defaults in the planar orientation of their auditory hair cell bundle. In addition, the length of the kinocilium was significantly reduced both in vestibular and cochlear hair cells from Elp3 cKO mice compared with wild type littermates. We were also able to demonstrate an increased level of apoptosis in the Elp3 cKO spiral ganglion at E14.5 leading to a reduced number of fibers innervating the cochlear hair cells as well as a reduced number of their synaptic ribbons at P0 and P15. In conclusion, our results clearly showed a role of Elp3 both in hearing and balance. We plan to go deeper in the mechanisms involved through the identification of the proteins acetylated by Elp3. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of Gamma Delta T cells in HPV-induced Cancer Progression
Van hede, Dorien ULg; Bastin, Renaud; Francis, Floriane et al

Poster (2013, January 28)

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (12 ULg)
See detailInteractomic map of the Ets factors family : Identification of unexpected functions in mRNA processing
Rambout, Xavier ULg; Simonis, Nicolas; Brohée, Sylvain et al

Poster (2013, January 28)

The Ets factors are a family of 27 transcription factors characterized by their unique DNA-binding domain. We aimed at building a protein-protein interaction (PPI) map (interactome) of the human Ets ... [more ▼]

The Ets factors are a family of 27 transcription factors characterized by their unique DNA-binding domain. We aimed at building a protein-protein interaction (PPI) map (interactome) of the human Ets factors in order to better define their roles and regulations in normal and oncogenic processes. The Ets interactome was built on a high-throughput yeast-two hybrid (Y2H) approach, and a literature and database curation. We identified 431 PPIs and 276 different protein partners. Clustering of the Ets interactome divided it into 24 functional subnetworks classified on their novelty index and their size. Cluster#1 was exclusively composed of newly identified interaction partners and was highly connected to the Erg subfamily of Ets factors. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed that it was associated to mRNA processing. In support of this result, we observed in HeLa cells that ERG and the components of cluster#1 localized in p-bodies and stress granules, physically linked cytoplasmic sites of mRNA degradation and silencing. Hence, we hypothesized that Erg proteins might have a role in post-transcriptional gene regulation and be involved in cellular mRNAs degradation. To test this hypothesis, we performed a MS2-based tethering assay and showed that the recruitment of ERG on a mRNA reporter promoted inhibition of its expression via a two-fold decrease of its half-life. ERG controls degradation of target mRNAs via different mechanisms including polysome stability, mRNA deadenylation, and p-bodies aggregation. A microarray-based appraoch identified 321 endogeneous genes whose mRNA decay rate was lowered in ERG silenced cells. Results point out the Nter domain of ERG as the predominant domain required for mRNA degradation. Importantly, oncogenic TET-Erg fusions described in AML and Ewing’s sarcoma exhibited diminished ability to degrade target mRNAs, concomitantly with the loss of the ERG Nter domain. This reinforces the important role of Erg proteins in mRNA degradation in cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferentiation of Boettcher's Cells During Postnatal Development of Rat Cochlea
Cloes, Marie ULg; Renson, Thomas; Johnen, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2013, January 28)

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See detailChemical probes and signaling pathways for the orphan GPCR GPR27
Dupuis, Nadine ULg; Gilissen, Julie ULg; Pirotte, Bernard ULg et al

Poster (2013, January 28)

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See detailDifferentiation of Boettcher’s Cells during Postnatal Development of Rat Cochlea
Cloes, Marie; Renson, Thomas; Johnen, Nicolas et al

Poster (2013, January 28)

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See detailWhole organ culture in rotating bioreactor: the rat embryonic inner ear
Renauld, Justine ULg; Johnen, Nicolas ULg; Hubert, Pascale ULg et al

Poster (2013, January 28)

In eutherian mammals, the organ responsible for the transduction of sound waves into nerve impulses is called the organ of Corti. This structure located within the cochlea, a portion of the inner ear, is ... [more ▼]

In eutherian mammals, the organ responsible for the transduction of sound waves into nerve impulses is called the organ of Corti. This structure located within the cochlea, a portion of the inner ear, is composed by two types of cells: sensory hair cells and non-sensory supporting cells. All these cells are distributed according to a specific arrangement along the whole length of the cochlea. So far, the mammalian inner ear is very sensitive to damage, with no hair cell replacement or cell proliferation occurring in the cochlea. That is why understanding the mechanisms that regulate the mammalian cochlear development is important for pursuing strategies to induce sensory hair cells regeneration. Here, we present a technique of whole embryonic inner ear culture in rotating bioreactors. Besides, we compare two different culture media, DMEM and Neurobasal-A. Rat inner ears are sampled at the 16th embryonic day (E16) and grown in rotating bioreactors during 48h or six days. After 48h, semithin sections realized in the growing cochlea show the development of the ventral epithelium and ultrathin sections confirm the differentiation of the sensory hair cells. Using immunochemistry techniques on our material after 48h or six days in vitro, we show that all the cells of the organ of Corti are differentiating, whichever the culture medium used. Our preliminary results demonstrate that organ culture of the embryonic inner ear in rotating bioreactor is possible. Such a method provides an in vitro model for the investigation of developmental, regulatory, and differentiation processes that could be helpful in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of the mammalian cochlea. [less ▲]

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See detailCis-acting inhibition of MHC class I-restricted epitope presentation by Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 genome maintenance protein
Sorel, Océane ULg; Myster, Françoise ULg; Vanderplasschen, Alain ULg et al

Poster (2013, January 18)

γ-Herpesviruses persist as latent episomes in actively dividing lymphocytes. Their consequent need to express a viral genome maintenance protein (GMP) during latency presents a potential immune target ... [more ▼]

γ-Herpesviruses persist as latent episomes in actively dividing lymphocytes. Their consequent need to express a viral genome maintenance protein (GMP) during latency presents a potential immune target. However, the GMPs from several γ-herpesviruses have evolved related strategies to limit their own MHC class I epitope presentation to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) is a γ-herpesvirus that persists asymptomatically in its natural host, the wildebeest. However, AlHV-1 transmission to a large number of susceptible ruminants, including cattle, results in the development of a lethal lymphoproliferative disease named malignant catarrhal fever (MCF). We recently observed that the AlHV-1 GMP-homologue encoded by ORF73 is highly expressed during MCF and that the impairment of its expression renders AlHV-1 unable to induce MCF. With its 1300 aa, AlHV-1 ORF73 is the largest γ-herpesvirus GMP described to date and contains a large acidic internal repeat region that could be involved in the cis-acting CTL evasion mechanism. Here, we sought to determine the CTL evasion properties of AlHV-1 ORF73. We first performed bioinformatic analyses to characterize the protein domains. Then, we used an in vitro assay to demonstrate that ORF73 severely limits the presentation at the cell surface of an MHC class I-restricted epitope linked to ORF73 in cis. These results suggest that AlHV-1 has developed mechanisms to evade cytotoxic anti-viral response during latency. The exact mechanisms explaining the presentation defect remain to be deciphered as well as the role of the cis-acting CTL evasion mechanism of ORF73 in the pathogenesis of MCF. [less ▲]

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See detailNutrient and phytoplankton responses to external forcing in a Mediterranean coastal area unbiaised by terrestrial inputs and local activities (Calvi, Corsica)
Goffart, Anne ULg; Hecq, Jean-Henri ULg; Collignon, Amandine ULg et al

Poster (2013, January)

We present a synthesis of a long-term (1979-2011) high-resolution study performed in the oligotrophic Bay of Calvi (Corsica, northwestern Mediterranean). We explore and discuss the mechanisms controlling ... [more ▼]

We present a synthesis of a long-term (1979-2011) high-resolution study performed in the oligotrophic Bay of Calvi (Corsica, northwestern Mediterranean). We explore and discuss the mechanisms controlling the interannual variability of both nutrient and phytoplankton bloom dynamics. [less ▲]

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See detailI am (un)happy but I don't know why: Subliminal positive-self statements effects
Bustin, Gaëlle ULg; Weinberger, Joel

Poster (2013, January)

This study provides evidence that positive self-statements can increase mood among unhappy people if they are presented subliminally. In study 1, participants with low and high levels of dispositional ... [more ▼]

This study provides evidence that positive self-statements can increase mood among unhappy people if they are presented subliminally. In study 1, participants with low and high levels of dispositional happiness were presented subliminally with the two words I AM which were immediately paired with a positive word. Results revealed that being exposed to subliminal positive self-statements seems to provide a boost in mood for people with less happy dispositions. Surprisingly, opposite effects were found for participants who had joyful dispositions: exposure to subliminal positive self-statements tended to lower their mood. Study 2 confirmed these results with an implicit measure of mood. Such results suggest that subliminal messages can affect emotions and highlight the necessity of taking personality into account in unconscious cognition research. [less ▲]

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See detailValidation of a French Version of a New Anxiety Trait Scale for Children
Geurten, Marie ULg; Meulemans, Thierry ULg; Fresson, Megan ULg et al

Poster (2013)

Anxiety diagnosis is relatively complex in children because intensity as well as symptoms of anxiety change during childhood (Bouden, Halayem, & Fakhfakh, 2002). The principal aim of this study was to ... [more ▼]

Anxiety diagnosis is relatively complex in children because intensity as well as symptoms of anxiety change during childhood (Bouden, Halayem, & Fakhfakh, 2002). The principal aim of this study was to validate through Confirmatory Factor Analyses (CFA) the a priori three-factor structure of the French version of the anxiety trait scale for children which includes psychological (“tend to be worried about everything”), behavioral (“tend to be upset, nervous or grumbling”), and somatic symptoms (“headache complaints”) of anxiety. This scale was previously found to discriminate, with high sensitivity and specificity, children with anxiety from control group. A first CFA performed on 288 6-12 year-old children showed an acceptable fit (2/df =2.66; RMSEA=.07 and CFI=.94). A second three-factor model was constructed and showed a better fit with a new sample of 287 children (2/df =2.18; RMSEA=.06 and CFI=.96), with a lower ECVI value for the model 2. For this model, the Cronbach’s alpha for each of the subscales ranged from .71 to .86, which confirmed the good internal reliability of the scale. This study provides a new three-factor structure for this anxiety scale and proposes normative data for French-speaking children. [less ▲]

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See detailL’agriculture périurbaine de la ville de Kinshasa et les revenus des maraîchers
Masiala Bode, Mabu; Lebailly, Philippe ULg

Poster (2013)

Ce poster vise à étudier la dynamique spatiale du site de Nzeza Nlandu, à déterminer les revenus tirés du maraîchage, à analyser le lien qui existe entre les revenus maraîchers et les superficies ... [more ▼]

Ce poster vise à étudier la dynamique spatiale du site de Nzeza Nlandu, à déterminer les revenus tirés du maraîchage, à analyser le lien qui existe entre les revenus maraîchers et les superficies emblavées et, à faire ressortir la contribution des revenus maraîchers dans les dépenses courantes des ménages exploitants. [less ▲]

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See detailExpansion of CD16+ CD56+ NK cells in vericyte® NK cell growth medium
Brohée, Laura ULg; Bastin, Renaud ULg; Wingert, S et al

Poster (2013)

Natural Killer (NK) cells play a key role in host resistance to virus and tumour. These cells are potent killers of virus infected and tumour cells via a direct recognition of the target by activation ... [more ▼]

Natural Killer (NK) cells play a key role in host resistance to virus and tumour. These cells are potent killers of virus infected and tumour cells via a direct recognition of the target by activation receptor such as NKG2D or by inducing Fcγ receptor (FcγRIII, CD16) mediated antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Current NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy aims to produce large amounts of functional NK cells, unfortunately most culture media used for NK cell expansion induced the downregulation of CD16 on NK cells. Here, we tested the impact of a new NK cell growth medium (Vericyte® from Medicyte) on CD16 expression. Sorted NK cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultivated in vericyte® NK cell growth medium and cells issued from these cultures were characterized in term of expansion and phenotype at several time points. After 5 days of culture, an expansion of both NK cells and PBMC was observed and maintained at least until day 20 of culture. In PBMC cultures, we observe only a small preferential NK cell growth since NK cells were around 5-10% at beginning of the culture and this percentage increased to 15% at the end of the culture. However, these cells showed a high proliferative potential when we started the culture with sorted NK cells (the proportion of contaminant cells remain low, under 5%). NK cells expressed CD56 and NKp46 and interestingly after a decreased expression of CD16 on the cell surface at day 3, this receptor was up regulated and most of the cells are CD56bright CD16bright from day 7 to day 12. According FACS FCS/SSC dot plot, NK cells acquired morphology of large activated lymphocytes and some of them expressed activation markers such CD25. Finally, these cells were able to kill efficiently tumour cell line K562. Thus our data show that vericyte® NK cell growth medium allows the expansion of functional CD16+CD56+ NK cells. Cytokine production and ADCC function are under investigation. [less ▲]

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See detailThermal and structural behaviour of four industrial laurie fats
Anihouvi, Prudent; Blecker, Christophe ULg; Dombrée, Anne et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailDifferentiation of Boettcher's cells during postnatal development of rat cochlea
Cloes, Marie ULg; Renson, Thomas; Johnen, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailCurrent net ecosystem exchange of CO2 in a young mixed forest: any heritage from the previous ecosystem?
Violette, Aurélie ULg; Heinesch, Bernard ULg; Erpicum, Michel ULg et al

Poster (2013)

For 15 years, networks of flux towers have been developed to determine accurate carbon balance with the eddy-covariance method and determine if forests are sink or source of carbon. However, for ... [more ▼]

For 15 years, networks of flux towers have been developed to determine accurate carbon balance with the eddy-covariance method and determine if forests are sink or source of carbon. However, for prediction of the evolution of carbon cycle and climate, major uncertainties remain on the ecosystem respiration (Reco, which includes the respiration of above ground part of trees, roots respiration and mineralization of the soil organic matter), the gross primary productivity (GPP) and their difference, the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of forests. These uncertainties are consequences of spatial and inter-annual variability, driven by previous and current climatic conditions, as well as by the particular history of the site (management, diseases, etc.). In this study we focus on the carbon cycle in two mixed forests in the Belgian Ardennes. The first site, Vielsalm, is a mature stand mostly composed of beeches (Fagus sylvatica) and douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) from 80 to 100 years old. The second site, La Robinette, was covered before 1995 with spruces. After an important windfall and a clear cutting, the site was replanted, between 1995 and 2000, with spruces (Piceas abies) and deciduous species (mostly Betula pendula, Aulnus glutinosa and Salix aurita). The challenge here is to highlight how initial conditions can influence the current behavior of the carbon cycle in a growing stand compared to a mature one, where initial conditions are supposed to be forgotten. A modeling approach suits particularly well for sensitivity tests and estimation of the temporal lag between an event and the ecosystem response. We use the forest ecosystem model ASPECTS (Rasse et al., Ecological Modelling 141, 35-52, 2001). This model predicts long-term forest growth by calculating, over time, hourly NEE. It was developed and already validated on the Vielsalm forest. Modelling results are confronted to eddy-covariance data on both sites from 2006 to 2011. The main difference between both sites seems to rely on soil respiration, which is probably partly a heritage of the previous ecosystem at the young forest site. [less ▲]

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See detailBrucella surveillance in stranded marine mammals from the North Sea
Alonso-Velaco, E.; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Michel, P. et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailTypologie des exploitations agricoles familiales du territoire de Kipushi/RDC
Tshomba Kalumbu, John; Nkulu Mwine Fyama, Jules; Berti, Fabio ULg et al

Poster (2013)

Ce poster vise à établir la typologie structurelle et fonctionnelle des exploitations agricoles familiales du territoire de Kipushi et à identifier et analyser les facteurs de production susceptibles ... [more ▼]

Ce poster vise à établir la typologie structurelle et fonctionnelle des exploitations agricoles familiales du territoire de Kipushi et à identifier et analyser les facteurs de production susceptibles d’influencer le niveau de compétitivité de cette agriculture périurbaine. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of iron and siderophores in Steptomyces development
Lambert, Stéphany ULg

Poster (2013)

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See detailAvantages et inconvénients d’une forêt communautaire
Meunier, Quentin; Boldrini, Sylvie; Boukouendji, B. et al

Poster (2013)

Le poster présente de façon didactique les avantages et inconvénients pour une communauté villageoise de démarrer un processus de forêt communautaire au Gabon

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See detailEvaluation of a new [18F] labeled tracer targeting synaptic vesicle protein 2C by ex vivo autoradiography and in vivo PET study in rat brain.
Warnock, Geoffrey; Aerts, Joël ULg; Mestdagh, Nathalie et al

Poster (2013)

Introduction The synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2) family is a group of integral membrane glycoproteins homologous to the major facilitator superfamily and could be involved in several neuronal diseasesa ... [more ▼]

Introduction The synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2) family is a group of integral membrane glycoproteins homologous to the major facilitator superfamily and could be involved in several neuronal diseasesa. The binding of the novel, no-carrier-added, [18F] labeled compound [18F]UCB-F to the SV2C isoform was evaluated in rat brain. Methods Radiochemistry No-carrier added [18F]UCB-F was obtained following the method shown in Fig. 1. The identity and purity of the tracer were evaluated by radioUPLC and chiral radioHPLC. Autoradiography Sprague Dawley rat brain sections were incubated at RT with buffered [18F]UCB-F solutions and exposed on film. Matching sections were stained with cresyl violet for structural identification. PET studies PET studies (Siemens Concorde Focus 120 µPET) were performed under isoflurane anesthesia. The tracer was injected as a bolus via the tail vein. After a 10-min transmission scan to correct for attenuation, dynamic emission data was recorded for a total of 60 min. The impact of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity on tracer uptake in the brain was evaluated using cyclosporine (50 mg/kg SC). Metabolite analysis During PET studies, arterial blood samples were taken for the measurement of tracer metabolites. Plasma was separated by centrifugation and proteins were acid-precipitated. Metabolites were detected using HPLC and confirmed by gamma counting. Results The tracer was obtained with a decay corrected yield of ±10%. Specific activity ranged from 10 GBq/µmol to 40 GBq/µmol. Ex vivo autoradiography showed that the binding of [18F]UCB-F to SV2C closely matched the expected distribution b (Fig.2). In vivo PET studies revealed that [18F]UCB-F briefly entered the brain, but exhibited extremely rapid washout. A large accumulation in the liver and intestines was observed. Metabolite analysis in the plasma revealed high protein binding and rapid metabolism. Inhibition of P-gp transport with cyclosporin had no clear effect on the rapid washout from the brain. Conclusions Despite a close match between [18F]UCB-F SV2C binding and the expected brain distribution, the pharmacokinetics in rat brain appear unfavorable for the use of this tracer to quantify SV2C in vivo. Acknowledgement / References a Lynch & al (2004) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101:9861 b Janz & Sudhof (1999) Neuroscience 94:1279 c The authors thank the Walloon Region and the FRNS Belgium for financial support. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of olefins from enzymatically interesterified palm oil
Gibon, Véronique; Maes, Jeroen; Dijckmans, Peggy et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailUnravelling the Roles of Elp3 in Ciliogenesis and Planar Polarity Establishment.
Huysseune, Sandra ULg; Boutin, Camille; Laguesse, Sophie ULg et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailEnzymatic remediation of crude palm oil
Gibon, Véronique; Kodali, Sitharam; Maes, Jeroen et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailApprovisionnement alimentaire de la ville de Bukavu : flux en provenance de l'intérieur du Sud-Kivu, du Rwanda et du Nord-Kivu
Vwima Ngezirabona, Stany ULg; Lebailly, Philippe ULg

Poster (2013)

Ce travail caractérise les flux principaux d’approvisionnements alimentaires de la ville de Bukavu en provenance de l’intérieur de la province du Sud-Kivu, du Nord-Kivu et du Rwanda issus du pointage des ... [more ▼]

Ce travail caractérise les flux principaux d’approvisionnements alimentaires de la ville de Bukavu en provenance de l’intérieur de la province du Sud-Kivu, du Nord-Kivu et du Rwanda issus du pointage des flux des produits alimentaires. [less ▲]

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See detailThe first Upper Paleolithic human remains from Belgium: Aurignacian, Gravettian and Magdalenian fossils at the “troisième caverne” of Goyet
Rougier, H.; Crevecoeur, I.; Beauval, C. et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailCO2, CH4 and N2O dynamics and fluxes in the brackish Lake Grevelingen (The Netherlands)
Borges, Alberto ULg; Meysman, Filip; Harlay, Jérôme ULg

Poster (2013)

Lake Grevelingen in the South West Netherlands is a former estuary locked off from the sea by two dikes and a brackish lake since 1971 (salinities from 29 to 33 during our sampling). It is connected with ... [more ▼]

Lake Grevelingen in the South West Netherlands is a former estuary locked off from the sea by two dikes and a brackish lake since 1971 (salinities from 29 to 33 during our sampling). It is connected with the North Sea by sluices, has a surface area of 108 km2, a mean depth of 5.3 m, a maximum depth of 48 m, and about 60% of the area the depth is less than 5 m. In summer, anoxia occurs in bottom waters. From January 2012 to December 2012 a biogeochemical survey was conducted at monthly interval at a fixed station (35 m depth) at Den Osse. Here, we focus on the analysis of partial pressure of CO2, and concentrations of CH4 and N2O obtained throughout the water column. pCO2 followed a typical seasonal cycle for temperate coastal environments shifting from CO2 over-saturation in winter to spring CO2 under-saturation due to the spring phytoplankton bloom, and shifting back to over-saturation in fall. Unlike the adjacent Southern Bight of the North Sea and the adjacent Oosterschelde, CO2 under-saturation prevailed in summer in Lake Grevelingen. CH4 values were minimal in winter ( 20 nM) and as stratification developed during spring and summer a distinct maximum of CH4 (up to 730 nM) developed at the pycnocline (5 to 10 m). N2O showed little seasonal variations and only a very faint increase with depth, except in August when bottom waters became anoxic. At this time, N2O shown a maximum ( 22 nM) at the oxycline (probably related to enhanced N2O production by nitrification at low O2 concentrations), and decreased in the anoxic layer ( 3 nM) (probably related to denitrification). [less ▲]

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See detailThe adventures of a little star
Nazé, Yaël ULg; Thonnard, Florine

Poster (2013)

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See detailExploring the sky
Nazé, Yaël ULg

Poster (2013)

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See detailThe Belgian sky
Nazé, Yaël ULg; Fontaine, Sébastien ULg

Poster (2013)

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See detailConstaining the wind collision region geometry in the WN+O binary V444 Cyg
Lomax, Jamie; Nazé, Yaël ULg; Hoffman, jennifer

Poster (2013)

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See detailPhotoferrotrophy and Fe-cycling in a freshwater column
Llirós, M; Crowe, SA; García-Armisen, T et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailPIXE-PIGE analysis of early medieval window glass from the abbey of Stavelot
Van Wersch, Line ULg; Mathis, François ULg; Biron, Isabelle et al

Poster (2013)

From the 1 st century, glass found in northern Europe was made from a mix of sand and natron that had to be imported from eastern Mediterranean [1]. After the fall of the Roman Empire, glassmakers could ... [more ▼]

From the 1 st century, glass found in northern Europe was made from a mix of sand and natron that had to be imported from eastern Mediterranean [1]. After the fall of the Roman Empire, glassmakers could either recycle existing glass or continue to import material. Then, around the end of the 8 th century, the first testimonies of potash glass, made with sand and trees ashes, are attested [1]. This type of glass would then prevail but the reasons and mechanisms of its appearance remain beyond understanding. They could be linked to the development of architecture and the growing needs of window glass. Founded in the middle of the VII th century, the abbey of Stavelot was a first time ruined by Vikings in 881. In the destruction levels, hundreds fragments of window glass were found [2]. 34 fragments were analysed in PIXE-PIGE at the cyclotron of the Institute of Nuclear and Atomic Physics and of Spectrometry of the University of Liège. The results show coexistence of both natron and potash glass on the site, even in the same archaeological contexts. For the coloration, the recipes to obtain turquoise or amber glass were comparable to those known on other early medieval sites [3], but to make green potash glass the artisans have used to two types of recipes. This shows the need to carry on researches and analysis on early medieval window glass in order to understand its production techniques that are also at the origin of famous gothic stained glass [less ▲]

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See detailPB15 polymorphic distinction in paint samples by combining micro- Raman spectroscopy and chemometrical analysis
Van Pevenage, Jolien; Defeyt, Catherine ULg; Moens, Luc et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailPredictive Value of Squamo-Columnar Junction Markers and p16ink4 in Multi-Observer Classification of Cervical Precursor Lesions
Jimenez, C; Howitt, BE; Nucci, MR et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailBrucella surveillance in stranded marine mammals from the North Sea
Alonso-Velasco, E.; Jauniaux, Thierry ULg; Michel, P. et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailDimensionnement et modélisation d'une micro-centrale solaire
Dumont, Olivier ULg

Poster (2013)

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See detailMicroRNA targeting of CoREST controls polarization of migrating cortical neurons.
Volvert, M. L.; Prevot, Pierre-Paul ULg; Pirotte, S. et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailCollection Efficiency and Design Requirements for Metallic Nanowire Networks in Solar Cells
Langley, Daniel ULg; Giusti, Gael; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy ULg et al

Poster (2013)

In using TCMs based on metallic nanowires it is important to determine the effect of nanowire geometry and spatial arrangement on the resulting network. To this end we have extensively simulated the ... [more ▼]

In using TCMs based on metallic nanowires it is important to determine the effect of nanowire geometry and spatial arrangement on the resulting network. To this end we have extensively simulated the effect of wire length and device size on the percolation properties of the network produced. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations of 2D conductive stick networks including for the first time stick lengths approximating nanowires which are produced experimentally. Each simulation is performed based on an average stick length but the actual lengths of the nanowires in the simulation are randomly generated with a normal distribution around the defined average length. The effects of density and length distribution on the percolation threshold are also explored. The results of such simulations are also employed to determine an elementary representative volume, which can be directly applied to a device design by allowing the determination of the nanowire density required to produce a conductive network associated with a characteristic length, such as diffusion length or pixel size. We also extend this work to the specific application of metallic nanowire networks as front electrodes in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC), allowing a calculation of the collection efficiency as a function of network density. These calculations were based on the diffusion length of electrons generated within a DSSC and a spatial mapping of the collection efficiency function on the solar cell surface. [less ▲]

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See detailErdheim-Chester Disease : A Monocentric Series Of 96 Patients
Haroche, Julien; Arnaud, Laurent; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailEffects of diazoxide, benzothiadiazine and benzopyrane derivatives on mitochondrial proton and electron leaks of cardiomyocytes (H9C2 cell line).
Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange ULg; Ceusters, Justine ULg; Charef, M et al

Poster (2013)

Background: Mitochondria are double membrane- organelles that play a central role in cellular metabolism, calcium homeostasis and redox signaling. They have been also considered as main producers of ... [more ▼]

Background: Mitochondria are double membrane- organelles that play a central role in cellular metabolism, calcium homeostasis and redox signaling. They have been also considered as main producers of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In many cancer cells those organelles become dysfunctional leading to a shift of energy metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to active glycolysis and an increase of ROS generation. According to Warberg’ theory, cancer damage might occur at the mitochondrial level, affecting tiny structures within each cell implicated in the energy production through ATP. New insight is that mitochondria might be a good therapeutic target for metabolic syndromes, ischemia/reperfusion injury and organs transplantation. Therefore, search for novel molecules able to keep mitochondria functional are of relevant interest. Methodology: Cardiomyocytes (H9C2 cells) were from ATCC (USA) and grown till confluence. The basal cellular respiratory rate, proton and electron leaks as well as ATP production were measured with the High Resolution Oxygraphy (Oroboros, Austria). All compounds: diazoxide (DIAZ), diazoxide –related analogs (1: BPDZ-259, 2: BPDZ-444), and benzopyran derivatives (3: BPDZ-490, 4: BPDZ-711) were tested at final concentration of 10-5 M, except when specified and compared to control samples (cells with or without DMSO). Results and conclusion: The basal respiratory rate of H9C2 cells (5x106/mL) was changed depending on the chemical structure of the tested compounds: e.g. compound 3 strongly enhanced the routine respiration, while 4 displayed a marked lowering effect. In contrast, the addition of similar concentration of benzothiadiazin derivatives (1, 2) had no effect on routine respiration but also on the other respiratory parameters such as oligomycin-induced leak and ATP production. Similar profile was obtained with the reference molecule: diazoxide. Overall, our findings indicate that both diazoxide-like analogues (1 and 2) and diazoxide were without significant effect on basal respiration, ATP production, even on maximal respiration. Interestingly, two derivatives show opposite effects: compound 3 behaves as a uncoupling agent and the other one (4) exhibits a real lowering effect on respiration but that was reversible. The latter effect might be of interest if this kind of molecules could be used for further use as an agent for organ conservation during transplantation. Our results also demonstrate that diazoxide, a well-known Mito-KATP opener, did not exert its effect beside of clinical situation like ischemia/reperfusion injury. [less ▲]

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See detailInduction of photosynthetic electron transfer upon anoxia in Chlamydomonas: role of hydrogenase activity and PSI-cyclic electron flow
Godaux, Damien ULg; Berne, Nicolas ULg; Remacle, Claire ULg et al

Poster (2013)

In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, anoxic environment leads to the expression of various fermentative/anaerobic pathways. Among them, oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases catalyze the reduction of protons from ... [more ▼]

In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, anoxic environment leads to the expression of various fermentative/anaerobic pathways. Among them, oxygen-sensitive hydrogenases catalyze the reduction of protons from reduced ferredoxin resulting in the production of molecular hydrogen. A possible role of chloroplast hydrogenase in the anaerobic induction of photosynthesis has been suggested forty years ago (Kessler, 1973) but never further explored. H2 evolution is a minor and transient phenomenon which is often considered as a safety mechanism to protect photosynthetic chain from overreduction (Melis and Happe, 2001; Hemschemeier et al., 2009). Recent data about hydrogen production in a pgrl1 (Proton Gradient Regulation like1) mutant with limited capacity for PSI-cyclic electron flow (CEF) also suggested a participation of CEF in photosynthesis reactivation after short dark-anoxic periods (Tolleter et al., 2011). Because H2 evolution is improved in pgrl1 mutant, authors came to the conclusion that H+ gradient generated by CEF strongly prevents electron supply to the hydrogenase and is thus a limitating factor for hydrogen production. The aim of our work is to further study the role of hydrogenase and CEF in the photosynthesis reactivation process after short (~1h) or long (>18h) dark-anoxic periods. We take advantage of the availability of hydrogenase-deficient mutants (hydEF, hydG) (Posewitz et al., 2005; Godaux et al., 2013) and above-mentioned CEF-deficient pgrl1 mutant. Light-induced photosynthetic electron transfer is studied by measuring hydrogen and oxygen evolution, as well as by following kinetics of chlorophyll fluorescence emission and P700 oxidoreduction. Firstly, we show that during the induction of photosynthesis after long dark-anoxic periods, there is a linear relationship between hydrogen evolution, PSI and PSII activities, meaning that an hydrogenase- dependent photosynthetic linear electron flow (LEF) mainly operates. Moreover, PSI and PSII photochemical yield are almost null in hydrogenase-deficient mutants. We conclude that hydrogenase is the main sink for photosynthetic electrons upon illumination after prolonged anoxia. Similarly, a linear correlation can be established between hydrogen evolution, hydrogenase expression/activity, and PSI or PSII photochemical yields upon adaptation to anoxia. In the next part of our work, we focus our attention on the role of PSI-CEF in the induction of photosynthesis upon anoxia. Combined measurements of PSI/PSII activities and O2/H2 evolution show that induction of photosynthesis is delayed in a Pgrl1-deficient strain. In absence of Pgrl1 protein, the H+ gradient is also lower and we thus propose that a lack of ATP is responsible for the delayed Calvin cycle reactivation, so that hydrogen production can be achieved for a longer time without inactivation of hydrogenase activity by evolved O2. These results are in good agreement with other results obtained by our group, demonstrating that state transition is a critical process for induction of photosynthesis in anoxia (Ghysels et al., accepted). In conclusion, a Pgrl1-dependent CEF seems to be in first importance to photosynthesis induction after one hour of dark-anaerobiosis adaptation, acting together with an hydrogenase dependant LEF to set favourable conditions for Calvin cycle activation. [less ▲]

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See detailLe minerai de fer en Wallonie: une cartographie des gisements
Denayer, Julien ULg

Poster (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 171 (8 ULg)
See detailp27(Kip1) as a master regulator of cortical neuron migration.
Godin, Juliette ULg; Thomas, Noémie; Laguesse, Sophie ULg et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailEtude de modes de production de charbon de bois sur l'axe Lubumbashi-Kasenga
Nge Okwe, A.; Ngoy Shutcha, M.; Nkulu Mwine Fyama, J. et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailCharacterization of structures with a complex disposition of YBCO coated conductors for magnetic shielding applications
Wera, Laurent ULg; Fagnard, Jean-François ULg; Levin, G. A. et al

Poster (2013)

An efficient superconducting magnetic shield can be built as an assembly of YBCO 2G coated conductor sections. Each section is milled and placed around a cylindrical support in order to form a joint free ... [more ▼]

An efficient superconducting magnetic shield can be built as an assembly of YBCO 2G coated conductor sections. Each section is milled and placed around a cylindrical support in order to form a joint free superconducting loop where persistent currents can flow and provide a strong attenuation of a magnetic field. Our previous works have shown that this assembly is able to shield an axial quasi static (“DC”) magnetic field and that the shielding performances depend on the aspect ratio and the number of layers. The purpose of the present work is to study experimentally the shielding efficiency of several structures with a more complex orientation and position of YBCO coated conductors. Our aim is to design a magnetic shield that would be able to shield a magnetic field directed at any angle with respect to the superconducting loops. Such a structure can be obtained by placing pairs of coated conductors sections along three orthogonal axes. All experiments are carried out at 77K. The structure is subjected to a quasi-static (“DC”) magnetic field. A Hall probe measures the three components of the local magnetic induction inside the assembly as a function of the applied magnetic induction. The shielding efficiency of the structure is characterized as a function of (i) the magnetic field amplitude, (ii) the position of the Hall probe along the three axes, and (iii) the angles between the applied magnetic field and each axis. The experimental results allow us to determine the shielding efficiency in the central part of the new 3-axes structure. Although the shielding efficiency is lowered with respect to that of the traditional 1-axis-coil geometry, measurements at different field orientations allow us to identify the role played by each of the pairs of coils in screening the external magnetic field. [less ▲]

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See detailMulti-Scale Modelisation of the Optical Second Harmonic Generation of Tyrosine-Containing Iturinic Antimicrobial Lipopeptides
Loison, Claire; Nasir, Mehmet Nail ULg; Benichou, Emmanuel et al

Poster (2013)

The optical Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) of Mycosubtilin Langmuir Layers at the air/water interface are modeled. In this tyrosine-containing lipopepeptide, the environment of the tyrosine residue is ... [more ▼]

The optical Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) of Mycosubtilin Langmuir Layers at the air/water interface are modeled. In this tyrosine-containing lipopepeptide, the environment of the tyrosine residue is critical in defining the SHG response. To propose reasonable the structure of Mycosubtilin aggregates at the air-water interface, molecular dynamics simulations (all-atom and coarse-grained) are performed. Molecular hyperpolarizability of the lipopeptide are obtained by Quantum Chemistry calculations. Finally, the SHG susceptibilities of the interface are calculated using a simple additive model. The molecular dynamics simulations suggest that lipopeptides aggregate at the interface into half-micelles, and that this phenomena is the origin of a constraint on Tyrosine orientation. In particular the C-OH bond of the Tyrosine residue has a preferential orientation along the interface normal, pointing towards the air. This inhomogneneous orientation distribution, associated with a dominant hyperpolarizability component along the C-OH bond of the Tyrosine, yields a characteristic SHG response. Comparison with experimental data gathered in our lab are proposed. [less ▲]

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