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See detailL’institution de la contre-culture
Saint-Amand, Denis ULg

Conference (2015, October)

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See detailLipid analysis on a putative early land plant and its matrix: Preliminary results
Versteegh, Gerath J.M.; Cascales-Miñana, Borja ULg; Gerrienne, Philippe ULg et al

Conference (2015, October)

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See detailSociology of literature and sociocriticism
Saint-Amand, Denis ULg

Conference (2015, October)

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See detailBelgian wildlife as potential zoonotic reservoir of hepatitis E virus
Thiry, Damien ULg

Conference (2015, October)

Hepatitis E is an acute human liver disease in healthy individuals but may become chronic. It is caused by the hepatitis E virus (HEV) and can have a zoonotic origin. In this study, 383 sera from wild ... [more ▼]

Hepatitis E is an acute human liver disease in healthy individuals but may become chronic. It is caused by the hepatitis E virus (HEV) and can have a zoonotic origin. In this study, 383 sera from wild boars were selected for serology; for virology, 69 sera and 61 livers from young wild boars were used. A total of 189 and 235 sera of respectively red and roe deer were collected for serological analysis. For virology, 84 and 68 sera and 29 and 27 livers from respectively red and roe deer were sampled. An apparent seroprevalence of 34% was found in wild boars, 1% in red deer and 3% in roe deer. In order to assess the ELISA screening prevalence, Western blot (WB) analyses and a ROC curve analysis were performed. Different scenarios with varying ELISA specificities relative to WB were analysed. In wild boar, seroprevalence remained high whatever the scenario; 4 out of 69 sera and 4 out of 61 livers were detected as positive for HEV RNA. All sequences obtained from sera belonged to genotype HEV-3. HEV RNA, belonging to genotype HEV-3, was detected in one red deer liver. Wild boar can be considered as a host reservoir of the virus in Belgium. However, the low prevalence in deer makes these species an unlikely reservoir. This evidence needs further investigation in order to determine in which situation deer can serve as reservoir and raise the question of the dynamics of HEV infection between wild fauna, domestic pigs and humans. [less ▲]

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See detailTriclosan retardes development of Sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus)
Dussenne, Mélanie ULg; Frederich, Bruno ULg; Das, Krishna ULg et al

Conference (2015, October)

The aquatic environment represents the final sink for many chemicals, including bactericidal agents. Among them Triclosan (TCS), with his chemical structure similar to thyroid hormones (THs), may have ... [more ▼]

The aquatic environment represents the final sink for many chemicals, including bactericidal agents. Among them Triclosan (TCS), with his chemical structure similar to thyroid hormones (THs), may have adverse effects on the thyroid system. The study we carried out aims to evaluate the effects of TCS exposure on development of Cyprinodon variegatus, a fish model used in ecotoxicological studies. We investigated the potential effects of TCS on C. variegatus during two key periods; embryonic development and metamorphosis. We exposed eggs and larvae to environmental relevant concentrations. We showed that TCS had no effect on reproduction parameters, such as egg fertility or survival rate of larvae. However, we highlighted the fact that hatching of exposed larvae was delayed of around 6 to 13 hours compared to control embryos. During the larval phase, measurements of THs levels were performed. We showed that TCS affected the typical ontogenic variations of the whole body thyroid hormones concentrations during metamorphosis. As THs are known to control somatic growth and development, we tested the effects of TCS exposure on morphological development. We observed no deformity or malformation, but we revealed a developmental retardation in larvae exposed to TCS, of around 18 to 32 hours. Such a developmental delay had never been highlighted in previous studies on TCS exposed fish. We hypothesize that the disruption of THs homeostasis affects the timing of the start of metamorphosis. As a consequence, exposed larvae showed an extended larval phase compared to the control group. The harmful effects of TCS on physiology and development are a major concern, as marine organisms are constantly exposed to it. Furthermore, strong connections exist between thyroid and reproductive system, which might have deleterious effects on population dynamics. [less ▲]

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See detailDévelopper l'autorégulation et les compétences en résolution de problèmes : une étude exploratoire en fin d'enseignement primaire
Fagnant, Annick ULg; Jaegers, Doriane ULg

Conference (2015, October)

L’article s’appuie sur une étude exploratoire en fin d'enseignement primaire (grade 6, élèves de 11-12 ans). L’approche d’enseignement/apprentissage mise en place visait conjointement à développer des ... [more ▼]

L’article s’appuie sur une étude exploratoire en fin d'enseignement primaire (grade 6, élèves de 11-12 ans). L’approche d’enseignement/apprentissage mise en place visait conjointement à développer des capacités d’autorégulation et l’apprentissage d’une démarche de résolution de problèmes en favorisant les régulations interactives et, particulièrement, le recours à une grille de co-évaluation. Le dispositif quasi-expérimental de l’étude permet d’apprécier les progrès plus importants des élèves de la classe expérimentale (comparativement à une classe contrôle) en termes de performances mais aussi d’une certaine anticipation et planification de la démarche de résolution. Ils démontrent aussi de meilleures capacités d’autoévaluation. Les entretiens réalisés avec quelques élèves permettent de mettre en évidence la plus-value des différentes formes de régulations interactives mises en place. Enfin, plusieurs éléments permettent également d’émettre l’hypothèse d’un impact positif de l’approche sur les variables affectives et motivationnelles. [less ▲]

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See detailDéchéance de nationalité et terrorisme : quelle marge de manoeuvre pour l'Etat?
Wautelet, Patrick ULg

Conference (2015, October)

Cette présentation a pour objet de situer de manière critique les récentes interventions du législateur belge en matière de déchéance de la nationalité belge, en montrant quelles sont les limites ... [more ▼]

Cette présentation a pour objet de situer de manière critique les récentes interventions du législateur belge en matière de déchéance de la nationalité belge, en montrant quelles sont les limites internationales à l'action du législateur national. Le cadre législatif en vigueur en Belgiqe est analysé en particulier à la lumière de l'interdiction de discrimination [less ▲]

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See detailFonds 'vautours', contentieux des dettes souveraines et droit de propriété
Wautelet, Patrick ULg

Conference (2015, October)

Cette présentation a pour objectif de contextualiser la loi du 12 juillet 2015 visant à réprimer l'action des fonds dits 'vautours' en offrant une première analyse critique de la loi, principalement au ... [more ▼]

Cette présentation a pour objectif de contextualiser la loi du 12 juillet 2015 visant à réprimer l'action des fonds dits 'vautours' en offrant une première analyse critique de la loi, principalement au regard de la protection internationale du droit de propriété [less ▲]

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See detailApparatuses as loci of bio-political emergence: development of genetic testing in Belgium
Fallon, Catherine ULg

Conference (2015, October)

In his vision of “biopolitics” Lemke (2011) proposes to conceptualize life and politics as entities intertwined within a dynamic relationship. These technologies change the production of norms and the ... [more ▼]

In his vision of “biopolitics” Lemke (2011) proposes to conceptualize life and politics as entities intertwined within a dynamic relationship. These technologies change the production of norms and the apparatuses (Foucault 2008) organizing the distribution of the living in the domain of utility: therefore biopolitics must be analyzed as center pieces in the transformation of politics. The developments in genomics and epigenetics support the vision of the individual body as an “information network” rather than a physical substrate. The experts (with the active support of the patients) construct models for the calculation of life in the development of policy regulation and contribute actively to frame the policy relevant issues – either at individual or at population level, on the basis of power strategies mobilizing and disseminating specific forms of knowledge which are disciplined and selective. The contribution will present the recent evolution of the apparatuses producing the technical regulation and financial norms for the use of genetic testing in the federal Belgian public health system, considering the two complementary level of the “dispositif” : - At the political level, transformation of the « Conseil supérieur de la Génétique humaine » (1973-2013) into a « Collège de médecins pour le centre de génétique humaine » and the development of new control relations between the subsidizing and control bodies and the hospitals, - At the individual level, transformation of the cooperation between medical doctors, biomedical experts and psycho-sociologists in the relationship with the patients, as they can be observed at the level of the hospital; Who has the resources (intellectual, technological or financial) to control the technology and its use ? what are the social, institutional and technological constrains? who defines and select the legitimate options ? The analysis is not so much normative than critical, giving due attention to the social context and contingent rationalities in the evolution of this peculiar political action, with the aim of opening new areas of discussions transgressing disciplinary and institutional borders which are too often considered as self evident. [less ▲]

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See detailPlankton ecosystem response to the decadal variation of winter intensity in the Mediterranean Sea : a long-term study (1979-2014)
Goffart, Anne ULg; Collignon, Amandine ULg; Hecq, Jean-Henri ULg et al

Conference (2015, October)

In the Mediterranean Sea, several studies with distinct data sets indicate that the pelagic ecosystem underwent periods of change in the late 1980s and in the early 2000s. Here we used a unique long-term ... [more ▼]

In the Mediterranean Sea, several studies with distinct data sets indicate that the pelagic ecosystem underwent periods of change in the late 1980s and in the early 2000s. Here we used a unique long-term time series of data collected in the well-preserved Bay of Calvi (Corsica island, Ligurian Sea, NW Mediterranean) from 1979 and 2014 to explore the synchrony between changes in environmental conditions and phyto- and zooplankton dynamics. We identified an almost decadal, long-term variability in winter intensity, with three distinct periods: the 1980s (1979-1988), the 1990s (1989-1998) and the 2000s (1999-2014), which were characterized by moderate, mild and highly variable winters, respectively. We pointed out how the decadal changes in winter intensity affected (i) the duration and intensity of phyto- and zooplankton blooms, (ii) the mean yearly biomasses, and (iii) the nature of the assemblages. High phyto- and zooplankton biomasses were observed in years characterized by moderate and severe winters, and low phyto- and zooplankton abundances were recorded in years with mild winters. Moderate/severe and mild winters were favorable for diatoms and gelatinous zooplankton, respectively. Focusing on meroplanktonic species, we explored ecological consequences of decadal variations observed in the Bay of Calvi for resource management. We highlighted parallelisms with other European seas. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of LMIs in supporting nonstandard professional transitions
Pichault, François ULg

Conference (2015, October)

The succession of economic and financial crises has led to the development of multiple categories of jobs ranging from unemployment and precarious jobs to full-time salaried positions (Schmid, 2015 ... [more ▼]

The succession of economic and financial crises has led to the development of multiple categories of jobs ranging from unemployment and precarious jobs to full-time salaried positions (Schmid, 2015). Between these two “extreme” situations, a “grey zone” of hybrid work categories is developing, with jobs supported by public authorities, temporary jobs, integration programs via internships and intensive training, incubators for new entrepreneurs, franchising, contract work, etc. The main common feature of such hybrid categories is a progressive transformation of the traditional employment relationships towards “multilaterality” (Countouris, 2007). If a context of nonstandard work arrangements (Cappelli & Keller, 2013) paves the way to nonstandard forms of professional transitions, it may also drive dissatisfaction, as the growing grey zone of hybrid statuses may be associated with cumulated precariousness, without counterparts (Kalleberg, 2009). Professional transitions through alternative work arrangements raise many questions in terms of job security, continuity of wage, skills development, integration into the social security system, etc. (Davidov, 2004; Havard et al., 2009; Keller & Seifert, 2013; Wears & Fisher, 2012). Who should take care of these issues? If individuals are no longer following a classical organisational and/or professional career, to what extent must their career path be automatically considered as their own responsibility and a result of their entrepreneurial capabilities? Between the “hierarchical” steering of organisational careers and the free “market” interplay specific to boundaryless careers (Arthur & Rousseau, 1996), there is a place for median formulas, seeking to both relieve individuals of the administrative difficulties linked to a discontinuous series of different statuses, while offering them new services that meet simultaneously their demands for flexibility and security. Our paper explores the extent to which such Labour Market Intermediaries (LMIs) can effectively secure nonstandard career paths. In order to characterize their roles, we created a multidimensional grid made up of 6 criteria: 1) partnership logic, 2) responsibility for matchmaking, 3) prevailing regulatory framework, 4) HR packages offered, 5) availability of information produced and 6) innovativeness. We illustrate this analytical framework via several case studies of LMIs operating in Belgium. Beyond the creation of an original multidimensional grid, our results outline two ideal-typical ways of securing nonstandard careers paths. Some LMIs reconstruct internal labour markets and operate as “quasi-employers”. Others suggest more disruptive solutions in which workers are supported while becoming fully responsible for their career as “self-employers”. Between these two extreme situations, many other possibilities may emerge according the variations of each criterion. Our multidimensional grid is an attempt to enrich existing typologies provided by the literature (Autor, 2008; Benner, 2003; Bonet et al., 2013). At the end of our analysis, a challenging hypothesis emerges from our empirical material. Once the support offered by LMIs goes away from the traditional employment patterns, a radical shift seems to occur in the purpose of career management: it is no longer a question of securing the employment relationship itself but rather a question of smoothing over welfare entitlements and incomes through professional transitions. It probably reflects more profound changes in the labour market, under the aegis of an active welfare State (Van Berkel et al., 2011)… [less ▲]

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See detailThe antibiotic resistance in the environment
Bardiau, Marjorie ULg

Conference (2015, October)

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See detailGestationnal trophoblastic diseases
GOFFIN, Frédéric ULg; Seckl, M

Conference (2015, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
See detailSoil production and hillslope transport in mid-latitudes during the last glacial-interglacial cycle: A combined data and modelling approach in northern Ardennes
Bovy, Benoît ULg; Braun, Jean; Demoulin, Alain ULg

Conference (2015, October)

The relative efficiency of various hillslope processes through Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles in the mid-latitudes is not well constrained. Based on a unique set of topographic and soil thickness ... [more ▼]

The relative efficiency of various hillslope processes through Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles in the mid-latitudes is not well constrained. Based on a unique set of topographic and soil thickness data in the Ardennes (Belgium), we combine the new CLICHE model of climate-dependent hillslope evolution with an inversion algorithm in order to get deeper insight into the ways and timing of hillslope dynamics under one such climatic cycle. We simulate the evolution of a synthetic hill reproducing the terrain attribute distributions of the hillslopes of a ~2500 km2 real area under a simple two-stage 120-kyr-long climatic scenario with linear transitions. The inversion method samples a misfit function in the model parameter space, based on estimates of the fit of topographic derivative distributions in classes of soil thickness and of the relative frequencies of the predicted soil thickness classes. Though the inversion results show convergence patterns for several parameters, no unique solution emerges. We obtain five clusters of good fits, whose centroids are taken as acceptable model solutions. Based on the predicted time series of average denudation rate and soil thickness, plus snapshots of the soil distribution at characteristic times, we compare these solutions with independent data not involved in the misfit function and identify the most realistic one. Providing first-order estimates of several parameters that compare well with published data, it shows that denudation rates increase dramatically at both warm-cold and cold-warm transitions when the mean annual temperature passes through the [0, -5°C] range. It also underlines the overwhelming importance of gelifluction in transporting soil and shaping hillslopes. [less ▲]

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See detailMars atmospheric escape constrained using MAVEN IUVS coronal observations
Chaffin; Deighan; Chauffray et al

Conference (2015, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULg)
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See detailLaparoscopic management of bladder endometriosis
BRICHANT, Géraldine ULg; NICOLAS, Hubert; NISOLLE, Michelle ULg

Conference (2015, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (3 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailValorisation de la biomasse pour des applications vers des marchés de niche
Richel, Aurore ULg

Conference (2015, October)

Dans le contexte économique actuel de notre société, il est reconnu que des alternatives et des compléments à la pétrochimie devront être développés dans un futur proche. L’une des solutions possibles ... [more ▼]

Dans le contexte économique actuel de notre société, il est reconnu que des alternatives et des compléments à la pétrochimie devront être développés dans un futur proche. L’une des solutions possibles réside dans le développement de procédés permettant de substituer les actuels produits pétro-sourcés par de nouveaux matériaux bio-basés issus de la biomasse. Sur base de ce constat, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech et son laboratoire de Chimie Biologique Industrielle se positionnent sur cette thématique en abordant les aspects technico-économiques de transformation du végétal en une gamme de produits à haute valeur ajoutée à destination de divers secteurs applicatifs tels que les matériaux, le cosmétique, le pharmaceutique, etc. L'importance de l'agronomie et des techniques agricoles, combinée à une gestion appropriée des déchets en circuits courts, sont deux piliers discutés dans ce exposé et illustrés au travers de divers exemples stratégiques. [less ▲]

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See detailImplication of adamalysin proteases in mesothelioma
Sepult, Christelle ULg; Rocks, Natacha ULg; Bekaert, Sandrine et al

Conference (2015, September 30)

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See detailL'enseignement-apprentissage du néerlandais en Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles: objectifs, méthodes, résultats
Rasier, Laurent ULg; Hiligsmann, Philippe

Conference (2015, September 30)

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See detailBien soigner l'arthrose: un enjeu capital pour notre société!
Henrotin, Yves ULg

Conference (2015, September 29)

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See detailSimulations of the auroral signatures of Jupiter’s magnetospheric injections
Dumont, Maïté ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Radioti, Aikaterini ULg et al

Conference (2015, September 29)

We report the evolution of ultraviolet auroral features located equatorward of the main emission appearing in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of the northern and the southern Jovian hemisphere. We ... [more ▼]

We report the evolution of ultraviolet auroral features located equatorward of the main emission appearing in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of the northern and the southern Jovian hemisphere. We investigate the possibility that those ultraviolet auroral structures are associated with energetic particle injections. For this study, we compare the characteristics of the simulated auroral signature of plasma injections with the observed parameters of equatorward isolated auroral structures. [less ▲]

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See detailPasser à Alma d’Ex Libris : projet de réinformatisation ? projet de bibliothèque ? L'expérience de l'Université de Liège 6 mois avant et 6 mois après
Renaville, François ULg; Thirion, Paul ULg

Conference (2015, September 29)

En janvier 2014, les Bibliothèques de l'Université de Liège ont décidé de passer au système de gestion de bibliothèque Alma. Le projet a débuté en août 2014 ; six mois après, la migration vers Alma et le ... [more ▼]

En janvier 2014, les Bibliothèques de l'Université de Liège ont décidé de passer au système de gestion de bibliothèque Alma. Le projet a débuté en août 2014 ; six mois après, la migration vers Alma et le lancement d'une nouvelle interface de découverte Primo étaient réalisés. Cette présentation balaye les moments clés de ce projet, en mettant l'accent sur la composante organisationnelle et la gestion du changement, ainsi que sur les premiers mois d’expérience avec le nouvel outil. [less ▲]

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See detailBetter tests better care : Syndrome-based diagnostics for respiratory tract infections
MELIN, Pierrette ULg

Conference (2015, September 29)

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See detailDynamics of the active region in Jupiter’s aurorae
Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Badman, Sarah et al

Conference (2015, September 29)

The Far-UV aurorae at Jupiter variety on a wide range of timescales. This study focuses on the dynamics of the active region on timescales of a few minutes. Up to now, only the time-tag mode of the Space ... [more ▼]

The Far-UV aurorae at Jupiter variety on a wide range of timescales. This study focuses on the dynamics of the active region on timescales of a few minutes. Up to now, only the time-tag mode of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph provides access to such fast variations with a high spatial resolution. This active region, located on the dusk flank of the area inside the main auroral oval, is the locus of particularly bright (up to several mega Reyleighs) and sudden (a few tens of seconds) enhancements called flares. A previous study also showed that these flare could reoccur quasi-periodically every 2-3 minutes and propagate from dusk to dawn. Here we use data obtained in 2013 and 2014 to show that this quasi-periodic behavior is only present on half of the cases and that the affected region could either cover the whole active region or a much smaller area (∼5000km^2). We also found areas that were still during part of the observation sequence and then began to blink (see Figure 1). We also show that there no systematically preferred propagation direction. Finally, sequences acquired successively in the two hemispheres show that the quasi-periodic flares can be in phase [less ▲]

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See detailExperimental and in silico approaches to study the interaction of Remorin with plant plasma membrane : specific interaction of the C-term domain with lipids
Deleu, Magali ULg; Nasir, Mehmet Nail ULg; Gronnier, Julien et al

Conference (2015, September 29)

The function of Remorins, a diverse family of plant-specific proteins (1) is far to be fully elucidated. One of them, StREM1.3 (for Solanum tuberosum Remorin from group 1, homolog 3) has been reported to ... [more ▼]

The function of Remorins, a diverse family of plant-specific proteins (1) is far to be fully elucidated. One of them, StREM1.3 (for Solanum tuberosum Remorin from group 1, homolog 3) has been reported to regulate cell-to-cell propagation of the potato virus X (2). It was also shown to be localized to the inner leaflet of plasma membranes (PMs) and along plasmodesmata, bridges connecting neighbor cells essential for cell-to-cell communication in plants (3). The mechanisms driving StREM1.3 association with PM is still an open question. It was shown recently that a domain of 28 residues at the C-terminus of the potato (RemCA) is required and sufficient for anchoring to the PM (4). Here we combined experimental and in silico biophysics to unravel the molecular bases of RemCA membrane binding. Biomimetic membrane models of plant PM such as monolayers and liposomes were used with various biophysical techniques (Langmuir monolayer technique, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroïsm) and modeling tools (home-made methods and molecular dynamics) (5) to answer to three questions: (i) What is the conformation adopted by RemCA within a membrane?, (ii) Is there any membrane lipid specificity in the RemCA-membrane binding? (iii) What is the role of the two different RemCA domains in the interaction? Results show that RemCA displays a preference for plant phosphoinositide and sitosterol-enriched inner leaflet plasma membrane rafts. Within the membrane, the C-terminal and the N-terminal domains adopt a random coil and a -helical conformation respectively. The C-terminal domain acts as a driver to bind RemCA to the membrane while the N-terminal domain stabilizes the peptide at the membrane. Lysine residues have a crucial importance in this interaction. References (1) Raffaele et al., Plant Physiol., 2007, 145: 593–600 (2) Raffaela et al., Plant Cell, 2009, 21: 1541–1555. (3) Maule, Curr. Opin. Plant Biol., 2008, 11: 680–686. (4) Perraki et al., Plant Physiology, 2012, 160 : 624-637. (5) Deleu et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta – Biomembranes, 2014, 1838 : 3171-3190. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh-throughput sequencing of toxins with pharmacological interest: proof of concept and first applications
Echterbille, Julien ULg; Degueldre, Michel ULg; Boulanger, Madeleine ULg et al

Conference (2015, September 28)

Animal venoms are complex chemical cocktails, comprising wide ranges of biologically active reticulated peptides that target with high selectivity and efficacy varieties of membrane receptors. Assuming ... [more ▼]

Animal venoms are complex chemical cocktails, comprising wide ranges of biologically active reticulated peptides that target with high selectivity and efficacy varieties of membrane receptors. Assuming the fact that each of the 170,000 venomous species reported can produce more than 250 bioactive toxins, at least 40,000,000 bioactive peptides and proteins may be discovered. Among the four described species of mambas, Eastern Jameson’s mamba (Dendroaspis jamesonii kaimosae) venom is the less characterized since only 9 peptides are referenced in database. This work aims at developing a new strategy devoted to the deep analysis of animal venoms. Our approach consists in a first separation of the venom using cation exchange chromatography. Each primary fraction is then purified a second time by classical RP-HPLC. A total of 328 fractions, containing amongst 1 and 4 toxins, are finally collected. MALDI-MS analysis of each fraction is done in order (1) to obtain information about masses and (2) to obtain sequences of toxins thanks to MALDI-In Source Decay (ISD) dissociation coupled with on MALDI target plate reduction of the peptides. ISD has already been demonstrated efficient for toxin sequencing1, and especially when using 1,5-DAN as reducing matrix2. ISD yields to sequences that cover more than 50% of peptide sequences by series of singly charged c-type ions. Thanks to this methodology, we were able to obtain 85% of satisfactory results i.e. spectra giving quite long tags of amino acids (up to 20 residues). As a way to validate our method, a tag coming from ISD spectrum interpretation has found a match in database for an Eastern Jameson’s mamba toxin. The global sequence has then been obtained by extrapolation on the ISD spectrum. Since ISD spectra are simpler than classical MS/MS spectra, automation of spectra interpretation, difficult with other fragmentation techniques (CID, ETD…), is implementable. In the near future, sequences obtained with this approach will be used to direct tests of biological activity through sequence homologies with already known ligands for different kinds of membrane receptors. [less ▲]

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See detailPsychological benefits of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program after breast cancer
Leclerc, Anne-France ULg; FOIDART-DESSALLE, Marguerite ULg; Bury, Thierry ULg et al

Conference (2015, September 27)

Background : Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women, affecting 8 women out of 100. With early detection and improved treatments, the number of deaths linked to this disease has declined ... [more ▼]

Background : Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women, affecting 8 women out of 100. With early detection and improved treatments, the number of deaths linked to this disease has declined. However, the disease and its treatments are at the origin of many undesirable side effects such as fatigue, anxiety, weight gain and sleep disorders. The objective of this study is to determine the psychological benefits of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program among women treated for breast cancer (on average six months after the end of the adjuvant radiotherapy or chimiotherapy). Material and methods : 122 patients were included into a control group (n = 61) and a treated group (n = 61). All participants were submitted to evaluations before the beginning of the trial and after three months. These evaluations included different questionnaires exploring the quality of life, anxiety, depression and various functions and other symptoms related to cancer (EORTC QLQ-C30, EQ-5D, STAI, HADS) and functional assessments. The control group has received no intervention unlike the treated group that received a three-month rehabilitation including supervised physical training (90 min) with three times a week and various psycho-educational sessions (120 min) once a week. Results : After three months, the health status (quality of life) (p < 0,0001), the functional role (p = 0,031), emotional state (p < 0,0001) and physical (p = 0,0045), cognitive (p = 0,0027) and social functions (p = 0,0018) improve significantly in the treated group. This observation also applies to symptoms of fatigue (p < 0,0001), insomnia (p < 0,0001), pain (p = 0,002), dyspnea (p = 0,009), loss of appetite (p = 0,04), anxiety (p < 0,0001) and depression (p < 0,0001) as well as physical parameters obtained through functional assessments. In the control group, these improvements do not appear. Conclusions : This study shows the feasibility and psychological benefits of such a multidisciplinary oncological rehabilitation program in women after their treatments for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to know the optimal time of beginning (during treatments or after them) and the optimal management time for this support. [less ▲]

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See detailHypoxic ischemic encephalopathy : new insights in neuroprotection
VIELLEVOYE, Renaud ULg

Conference (2015, September 26)

Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a major contributor to neonatal morbidity and mortality and is a common cause of disability with devastating impact on individuals and families. During the acute ... [more ▼]

Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a major contributor to neonatal morbidity and mortality and is a common cause of disability with devastating impact on individuals and families. During the acute phase, HIE is initially characterized by an excitotoxic cascade with hypoxic membrane depolarization, cytotoxic edema, glutamate release and intracellular accumulation of calcium leading to necrotic cell death and production of proinflammatory cytokines through the NF-κB pathway. In a second phase, reperfusion leads to production of free radicals, activation of proteases and phospholipases, exacerbing the damage to cell membrane and DNA and mitochondrial dysfunction causing caspase mediated apoptotic cell death. In a third phase, growth factors and inflammatory cytokines produced during the early phase of HIE attempt to repair damage induced by hypoxia–ischemia. Although the utility of therapeutic hypothermia induced in the 6 hours following HIE in the reduction of death or major neurodevelopmental disability is now well established in the neonate with moderate or severe encephalopathy, almost half of these children still die or have abnormal outcomes [1]. Protocols attempting to optimize cooling with deeper hypothermia (33.5°C vs 32.0°C) and/or longer duration (72h vs 120h), as well protocols studying neuroprotective effect of late hypothermia (6-24h) or hypothermia for 33-35 week GA preterm babies are currently performed. Furthermore, experimental data suggest that hypothermia extends the duration of the therapeutic window [2] and that certain drugs given during this time may improve neuroprotection either additively or synergistically. Xenon is a noble gas with anaesthetic and neuroprotective properties. It inhibits NMDA receptor, promotes cell survival and induces the production of erythropoietin and vascular endothelial growth factor through the hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) pathway. Data from experimental piglet models of hypoxia-ischemia (HI) demonstrate a synergy when Xenon is administered in combination with mild therapeutic hypothermia [3]. In the human newborn, a phase-1 trial recently established that breathing 50% Xenon for up to 18 hours with 72 hours of cooling was feasible, with no adverse effects seen with 18 months’ follow-up [4]. A monocentric phase-3 trial is currently under process in England. Melatonin is a remarkable natural antioxidant but also exhibits antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro. In animal models, melatonin administration prior or after the onset of HI significantly reduced infarct volume demonstrating both prophylactic and therapeutic effect [5-6]. When combined with hypothermia, melatonin enhances neuroprotection by reduction of the H–I-induced increase in clinically relevant biomarkers in the deep grey matter of newborn piglets [7]. Clinical studies confirmed its safety profile and its ability to reduce biomarkers level of HI in the human newborn [8]. Recently, a randomized controlled trial showed that the combination of melatonin and hypothermia administered to infants with moderate-to-severe H–I brain injury was efficacious in reducing oxidative stress, neonatal seizures and MRI brain lesions as well as in improving neurological outcomes at 6 months of age [9]. Erythropoietin (EPO) and its receptor are expressed in the developing central nervous system and are required for normal brain development. EPO is up-regulated in umbilical cord blood from babies who have suffered HI, which may be an endogenous repair mechanism. In vitro and in vivo neuroprotection induced by EPO is achieved by several mechanisms such as direct neurotrophic effect, direct antioxidant effects, decreased inflammation or regulation between pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic factors. Safety profile of EPO administration during hypothermia for newborns with HIE has been established in Phase I trials [10]. In a randomized prospective pase-2 trial, repeated low-dose rEPO reduced the risk of disability for infants with moderate but not severe HIE at 18 months, without apparent side effects [11]. A double-blind randomized controlled phase-3 trial is currently performed in France. Allopurinol is a xantine-oxidase inhibitor. In high concentrations it also scavenges hydroxyl radicals and prevents free radical formation. Allopurinol provides neuroprotection in rat and piglets models of HIE. In the human, a systematic review and meta-analysis of three studies on 114 newborns did not reveal statistically difference in the risk of death or a composite of death or severe neurodevelopmental disability between groups [12]. It was hypothesized that postnatal allopurinol treatment started too late to reduce reperfusion-induced free radical surge. However, in a recent study, allopurinol given to mothers during labor with fetal hypoxia did not significantly lower neuronal damage markers in cord blood even if post hoc analysis revealed a potential beneficial treatment effect in girls [13]. Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is a naturally occurring NMDA receptor antagonist. MgSO4 given to mothers at risk for preterm birth is associated with a reduced risk of cerebral palsy and gross motor dysfunction in their children. Its role as an adjuvant to therapeutic hypothermia in the asphyxiated term infant remains unclear. A recent review of preclinical studies using MgSO4 in HIE highlights the inconsistent impact between studies related to a lack of temperature control during and after HI, along with variability in the dose, timing of treatment [14]. A metaanalysis of five randomized controlled trials that compared magnesium to control in newborns with HIE showed a significant improvement in short term outcomes but no difference in the composite outcome of death or moderate to severe disability at 18 months [15]. Other NMDA and AMPA antagonist such as topiramate and memantine also exhibited neuroprotective properties in animal models but safety and efficacy in the human newborn with HIE still needs to be clarified [16]. N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) acts as a glutathione precursor with antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory properties. In a piglet model of HIE, NAC reduced cerebral oxidative stress, reduced cerebral lactate accumulation and improved cerebral perfusion. When combined with hypothermia in the asphyxiated rodent, NAC decreased infarct volume, improved myelin expression and functional outcomes on a synergistic pattern. NF-κB inhibitors and NO synthase inhibitors are other therapeutic options currently under investigation in in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies. Moreover, recent research performed at the University of Liege also suggests that Estetrol (E4), an estrogen synthetized exclusively by the human foetus, has neuroprotective properties in a rat model of HIE. Translation to clinical use in humans still needs to be studied [17]. Several therapies have also been suggested in order to improve mechanisms of repair and regeneration observed after the HI insult. Growth factors such as BDNF, IGF-1, EGF or bFGF can improve cell viability, stimulate the growth of new neurons or promotes oligodendroglial differentiation and myelination. Recent advances in regenerative medicine suggest that stem cell transplantation may improve repair of the damaged brain after HIE through the replacement of dead cells as well as through the release of trophic factors [18]. Animal preclinical data are promising. However many questions need to be answered with well-designed controlled trials before clinical application in daily practice. References [1] Edwards AD et al. (2010) Neurological outcomes at 18 months of age after moderate hypothermia for perinatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy: synthesis and meta-analysis of trial data. BMJ. 340:c363. [2] O'Brien F et al. (2006) Delayed whole-body cooling to 33 or 35 degrees c and the development of impaired energy generation consequential to transient cerebral hypoxia-ischemia in the newborn piglet. Pediatrics 117:1549–59. [3] Chakkarapani, E. et al. (2010) Xenon enhances hypothermic neuroprotection in asphyxiated newborn pigs. Ann. Neurol. 68, 330–341 [4] Dingley, J. et al. (2014) Xenon ventilation during therapeutic hypothermia in neonatal encephalopathy: a feasibility study. Pediatrics 133, 809–818 [5] Carloni, S. et al. (2008) Melatonin protects from the long-term consequences of a neonatal hypoxic–ischemic brain injury in rats. J. Pineal. Res. 44, 157–164 [6] Hutton, L.C. et al. (2009) Neuroprotective properties of melatonin in a model of birth asphyxia in the spiny mouse (Acomyscahirinus). Dev. Neurosci. 31, 437–451 [7] Robertson, N.J. et al. (2013) Melatonin augments hypothermic neuroprotection in a perinatal asphyxia model. Brain 136, 90–105 [8] Fulia, G. et al. (2001) Increased levels of malondialdehyde and nitrite/nitrate in the blood of asphyxiated newborns: reduction by melatonin. Journal of Pineal Research; 31(4):343–349. [9] Aly, H. et al. (2015) Melatonin use for neuroprotection in perinatal asphyxia: a randomized controlled pilot study. J. Perinatol. 35, 186–191 [10] Wu, Y.W. et al. (2012) Erythropoietin for neuroprotection in neonatal encephalopathy: safety and pharmacokinetics. Pediatrics 130, 683–691 [11] Zhu, C. et al. (2009) Erythropoietin improved neurologic outcomes in newborns with hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy. Pediatrics 124, 218–226 [12] Chaudhari, T. and McGuire, W. (2012) Allopurinol for preventing mortality and morbidity in newborn infants with hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy. Cochrane Database Syst. Rev. 7, Cd006817 [13] Kaandorp, J.J. et al. (2015) Maternal allopurinol administration during suspected fetal hypoxia: a novel neuroprotective intervention? A multicentre randomised placebo controlled trial. Arch. Dis. Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 100, F216–F223 [14] Galinsky, R. et al. (2014) Magnesium is not consistently neuroprotective for perinatal hypoxia-ischemia in term-equivalent models in preclinical studies: a systematic review. Dev. Neurosci. 36, 73–82 [15] Tagin, M. et al. (2013) Magnesium for newborns with hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J. Perinatol. 33, 663–669 [16] Wu, Q et al. (2015) Neuroprotective agents for neonatal hypoxic–ischemic brain injury. Drug Discovery Today. [17] Tskitishvili, E et al. (2014). Estetrol attenuates neonatal hypoxic–ischemic brain injury. Experimental Neurology, 261, 298-307. [18] Kelen, D and Robertson, NJ. (2010) Experimental treatments for hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. Early Human Development 86; 369–377. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysicochimie de la pollution atmosphérique
Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg

Conference (2015, September 25)

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See detailBaltic seagrass meadows as a sediment carbon sink
Jankowska, Emilia; Włodarska-Kowalczuk, Maria; Michel, Loïc ULg et al

Conference (2015, September 25)

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See detailHabitants des petites villes et des villages face à la nature dans les paysages ordinaires
Vanderheyden, Vincent ULg

Conference (2015, September 25)

La recherche sur les perceptions paysagères dénigre souvent les paysages ordinaires, ces paysages modifiés par l’homme qui n’appellent pas à la protection. Pourtant, dans les régions de forte densité de ... [more ▼]

La recherche sur les perceptions paysagères dénigre souvent les paysages ordinaires, ces paysages modifiés par l’homme qui n’appellent pas à la protection. Pourtant, dans les régions de forte densité de population comme la Belgique, les paysages naturels sont rares ou inexistants, sans pour autant que la nature ait disparu des paysages ordinaires. Il est donc intéressant de se poser la question de la nature dans de tels paysages : à partir de quand un paysage est-il perçu comme naturel par ceux qui l’observent ou y vivent ? Les critères dépendent-ils du mode d’habiter (petite ville, village périurbain ou village rural) ou d’autres facteurs liés à la trajectoire biographique des gens ? Trois terrains d’études ont été retenus pour la recherche : la Wallonie picarde, l’Entre-Sambre et Meuse et l’Ardenne. Ces terrains offrent des paysages ruraux assez typés et suffisamment différenciés et éloignés des grandes agglomérations urbaines, hormis Tournai, ville d’envergure régionale. La Wallonie picarde présente des paysages de vastes plateaux agricoles limoneux au relief plan et peu élevé, occasionnellement surplombé de petites collines. L’Entre-Sambre-et-Meuse offre des paysages mixtes, alternant cultures, prairies et boisement dans un relief plus accidenté d’altitude moyenne. Enfin, l’Ardenne, troisième terrain, montre des paysages de hauts plateaux disséqués, dominés par les massifs forestiers et les pâturages. Ces terrains offrent un bel aperçu du continuum urbain-rural belge : de la petite ville en milieu rural au semis d’habitat très lâche du village ardennais, loin de l’habituelle dichotomie ville - campagne. Dans ces terrains, une approche empirique a été privilégiée. Nous y avons interviewé trois groupes de neuf étudiants (18-25 ans) d’un niveau d’éducation moyen (Bac +1 à Bac +3), non spécialistes en analyse du paysage, habitant dans de petites villes ou villages et un de leurs parents. Durant l’enquête, les personnes devaient classer des photos de paysages ruraux belges plus ou moins impactés par la présence de l’homme (habitat, cultures, éoliennes, pylônes, zones périurbaines) puis devaient motiver leur classement. Les entretiens ont été enregistrés, retranscrits et codés à l’aide d’un logiciel d’analyse qualitative. L’analyse de contenu montre des résultats contrastés. Un certain consensus indépendant du mode d’habiter semble se dégager concernant la présence d’éléments anthropiques récents, tels quel les éoliennes, les zones industrielles ou les pylônes électriques : cela participe à la dénaturation d’un paysage, avec une subtile nuance pour les éoliennes, où la symbolique positive écologique peut pour certains contrebalancer la perte de naturalité induite. Chez des personnes vivant dans un milieu plus urbanisé, le paysage naturel attire, car il change des habitudes de vie. Certains n’hésitent pas à qualifier un paysage de naturel pour peu qu’il contienne suffisamment de végétation, fusse une vaste étendue agricole dédiée à la monoculture. Chez des personnes vivant dans des milieux très ruraux par contre, on ne constate pas toujours la tendance inverse : même la petite ville voisine semble parfois trop urbanisée à leurs yeux pour y vivre. A leurs yeux, les paysages deviennent moins attractifs au fur et à mesure que la densité du bâti devient perceptible. Plus qu’une analyse du visuel, cette recherche montre également que les gens s’imaginent être dans le paysage, entendant les bruits ou ressentant une perte de convivialité à mesure que le paysage s’industrialise ou se remplit de maisons. [less ▲]

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See detailEn tous quartiers ou j’ay esté. Le récit de pèlerinage de Georges Lengherand, mayeur de Mons (1486–1487)
Bruwier, Marie-Cécile; Docquier, Gilles; Marchandisse, Alain ULg

Conference (2015, September 25)

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See detailOn generalized Hölder spaces
Kreit, Damien; Nicolay, Samuel ULg

Conference (2015, September 24)

We introduce generalized pointwise Hölder spaces as the point wise version of generalized uniform Hölder spaces. These last ones can be seen as a special case of generalized Besov spaces.

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See detailPerformances of a simple exhaust mechanical ventilation coupled to a mini heat pump: modeling and experimental investigations
Ransy, Frédéric ULg; Gendebien, Samuel ULg; Lemort, Vincent ULg

Conference (2015, September 24)

According to the European directive 2012/27/EU of October 2012 on energy efficiency, buildings represented 40 % of the EU’s final energy consumption in 2011. The major part of this energy consumption is ... [more ▼]

According to the European directive 2012/27/EU of October 2012 on energy efficiency, buildings represented 40 % of the EU’s final energy consumption in 2011. The major part of this energy consumption is due to the residential sector for space heating and domestic hot water production. Moreover, buildings are crucial to achieve the EU objective of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80-95 % by 2050 compared to 1990. In order to reduce these greenhouse gas emissions, retrofit measures regarding insulation and air-tightness have to be taken. However, such improvements of the building envelope lead to a relative increase in consumption related to ventilation. Indeed, according to Orme (2001), Roulet et al. (2001) and Fouih et al. (2012), the heating demand due to ventilation can reach more than 50 % of the total building heating demand for new and retrofitted buildings. To reduce the energy consumption due to ventilation, exhaust air heat pumps (EAHPs) can be used instead of the traditional heat recovery with an air-to-air heat exchanger. EAHPs recover heat from the exhaust air of the ventilation system to produce domestic hot water and space heating. According to Fehrm et al. (2002), this technology is already widely used in the northern countries such as Germany and Sweden. In fact, according to Fracastoro et al. (2010), efficiencies of EAHPs are higher than those obtained with outside air or geothermal heat pumps in certain conditions, whatever the climate location. Berg et al. (2010) have monitored three houses in Sweden equiped with exhaust air heat pumps. The seasonal performance factor (SPF) values were all within the range 1.4-1.7. This factor takes into account the energy consumption of the heat pumps and the auxiliary heating systems. A 17 kW exhaust air heat pump has also been tested by Mikola et al. (2014). The measured SPF for the heat pump only (without taking into account the auxiliary heating system) was about 2.9-3.4 in winter and 3 in the summer. Exhaust air heat pumps coupled with simple exhaust mechanical ventilation systems have many advantages compared to traditional balanced systems with heat recovery: • Only one fan is necessary and the duct system is simpler. Consequently, EAHPs are suitable for retrofitted buildings. • The heat pump can provide the whole part of the heating demand related to domestic hot water and 50 % of the heating demand related to space heating, according to Fracastoro et al. (2010). • The heat pump can also provide active cooling by inversing the refrigerating cycle. • The heat pump performance is high and remains constant with outdoor temperature changes since the temperature of the heat sink is constant (20°C). As a result, the system is cost-effective. • The system is compact, quiet and requires little maintenance. In the present paper, the energetic performances of an exhaust air heat pump are assessed through numerical and experimental studies. The thermal capacity of the machine is 1.5 kW when the inside air temperature is 20°C and the outside water temperature is 35°C. The heat pump is therefore ideally suited for new or retrofitted buildings. The system including a mechanical exhaust ventilation system and an exhaust air heat pump is first presented. Secondly, the heat pump model used afterwards to determine the heat pump seasonal performance factor is described. Thirdly, the model is calibrated to fit the measurement data. Finally, the heat pump model is coupled to a building model to determine the annual performance of the system. The system is compared to a traditional balanced ventilation system with heat recovery in terms of primary energy consumption, for different heating and DHW production systems (electric heater, heat pump, gas condensing boiler). [less ▲]

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See detailMedicinal plants, malaria and biotechnology
Frederich, Michel ULg; Jansen, Olivia ULg; Muganga, Raymond et al

Conference (2015, September 24)

The first part of the talk will be dedicated to the investigation of medicinal plants with the objective to identify new antimalarial treatments. According to the last World Malaria Report [1], there were ... [more ▼]

The first part of the talk will be dedicated to the investigation of medicinal plants with the objective to identify new antimalarial treatments. According to the last World Malaria Report [1], there were 584 000 deaths for 198 millions malaria cases worldwide in 2013. Particularly, the disease caused an estimated 437 000 African children died before their fifth birthday, still in 2013. Malaria is caused by a parasite, Plasmodium sp. and transmitted by Anopheles mosquitoes. The problem of parasite resistance towards common available medicines such as chloroquine, mefloquine, quinine, is increasing. In this context, the vegetal kingdom remains the main source of pharmacologically active compounds against this parasitic infection as attested by the famous quinine, isolated from Cinchona sp., artemisinin extracted from Artemisia annua and also atovaquone derived from lapachol found in several Bignoniaceae. All these substances are related to plants with traditional use against fever and malaria. Beside these well-known examples, various new antiplasmodial compounds are frequently discovered from Nature, particularly following an ethnopharmacological approach, as reviewed by several authors in recent years [2-6]. Then, the pharmacological and phytochemical study of plants from traditional pharmacopoeias can be of first interest not only to discover new antimalarial “lead compounds”, but also to valorize local vegetal species whose efficacy and safety would have been demonstrated in laboratory and by clinical investigations [7,8]. Some results obtained with Dicoma tomentosa from Burkina-Faso [9] and Terminalia mollis from Rwanda [10] will be presented. In the second part of the talk, two applications of biotechnology for the production of artemisinin and paclitaxel and then some works developed at the ‘Université de la Réunion’ will be presented. In the framework of this collaboration, Psiadia arguta, an endemic plant from Reunion Island, which is known to have cytotoxic, anti-plasmodial and anti-inflammatory properties, was subjected to micropropagation. The objective of the work was to compare the biological properties and the phytochemical composition of callus, vitroplants and acclimatized plants of Psiadia arguta [11]. 1. WHO, World Malaria Report 2014, December 2014, Geneva (http://www.who.int/malaria/publications/world_malaria_report_2014/en/). 2. Batista R, Silva Ade J Jr, de Oliveira AB: Plant-derived antimalarial agents: new leads and efficient phytomedicines. Part II. Non-alkaloidal natural products. Molecules 2009, 14:3037-72. 3. Bero J, Frédérich M, Quetin-Leclercq J : Antimalarial compounds isolated from plants used in traditional medicine. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology 2009, 61:1401–1433. 4. Bero J and Quetin-Leclercq J: Natural products published in 2009 from plants traditionally used to treat malaria. Planta Medica 2011, 77:631-40. 5. Kaur K, Jain M, Kaur T, Jain R: Antimalarials from nature. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry 2009, 17:3229–3256. 6. Nogueira CR and Lopes LMX: Antiplasmodial Natural Products. Molecules 2011, 16:2146-2190 7. Ginsburg H and Deharo E: A call for using natural compounds in the development of new antimalarial treatments – an introduction. Malaria Journal 2011, 10 (suppl. 1):S1 8. Willcox M, Graz B, Falquet J, Diakite C, Giani S, Diallo D: A “reverse pharmacology” approach for developing an antimalarial phytomedicine. Malaria journal 2011, 10(suppl1):S8 9. Jansen, O., Tits, M., Angenot, L., Nicolas, J.-P., De Mol, P., Nikiema, J.-B., & Frédérich, M : Anti-plasmodial activity of Dicoma tomentosa (Asteraceae) and identification of urospermal A-15-O-acetate as the main active compound. Malaria Journal 2012, 11, 289. 10. Muganga, R., Angenot, L., Tits, M., & Frédérich, M : In vitro and in vivo antiplasmodial activity of three Rwandan medicinal plants and identification of their active compounds. Planta Medica 2013, 80(6), 482-489. 11. Mahy Justine, Comparative study of biological activities and analysis of volatile compounds of Psiadia arguta in various cultures: vitroplants and acclimatized plants. Mémoire de M2, 2013, Université de Liège/Université de la Réunion. [less ▲]

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See detailVALIDATION RELEVANCE OF ANALYTICAL METHODS IN BIOTECHNOLOGY
Marini Djang'Eing'A, Roland ULg; Hubert, Philippe ULg

Conference (2015, September 24)

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See detailPerformances analytiques d’un biomarqueur : dialogue
CAVALIER, Etienne ULg

Conference (2015, September 23)

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See detailStratospheric HCl increasing again, caused by dynamic variability, driven by increased tropopsheric wave activity
Notholt, J; Mahieu, Emmanuel ULg; Pfloeger, F et al

Conference (2015, September 22)

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See detailAir-sea ice gases exchange: update of recent findings, outcomes from sea ice models, caveats and open questions
Delille, Bruno ULg; Zhou, Jiayun; Kotovitch, Marie ULg et al

Conference (2015, September 21)

There are growing evidences that sea ice exchanges climate gases with the atmosphere. We will rapidly present a state of the art of current large scale assessment of spring and summer uptake of ... [more ▼]

There are growing evidences that sea ice exchanges climate gases with the atmosphere. We will rapidly present a state of the art of current large scale assessment of spring and summer uptake of atmospheric CO2. We will challenge these assessments with 1) new evidence of significant winter CO2 release for winter experiments 2) new finding of the role of bubbles formation and transport within sea ice and 3) impurities expulsion derived from combined artificial ice experiment and modelling. Finally, comparison of air-ice fluxes derived from automated chamber and micrometeorological method and, mechanistic and box models show significant discrepancies that suggest that the contribution of sea ice to the air-ocean fluxes of CO2 remain an open question. We will also highlight that sea ice contribute to the fluxes of other gases as CH4 ,N2O and DMS [less ▲]

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See detailPathways of recurrent high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions of the cervix
Herfs, Michael ULg

Conference (2015, September 20)

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See detailNon-invasive markers: the role of G-CSF?
Munaut, Carine ULg

Conference (2015, September 19)

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See detailInnovation in Veterinary Education. Innovative tools to teach pregnancy and parturition in the horse.
Hanzen, Christian ULg; Govaere, Jan

Conference (2015, September 18)

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See detailThe importance of physical educators’ representations about physical activity
Cloes, Marc ULg

Conference (2015, September 18)

Physical education (PE) teachers need to develop clear representaitons about physical activity (PA). In fact, they have to promote an active lifestyle among their pupils/students and it will not be ... [more ▼]

Physical education (PE) teachers need to develop clear representaitons about physical activity (PA). In fact, they have to promote an active lifestyle among their pupils/students and it will not be possible without developing an extended knowledge about physical activity. This presentation has been designed in order to make the PE teachers and their trainers that their representations about PA could be worse than they believe. Moreover, the interactive way of this presentation will provide an interesting example of an approach that could be used on the field. [less ▲]

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See detailDietary mineral intakes of young Tibetan children living in areas endemic for Kashin-Beck disease: preliminary results of a cross-sectional survey
DERMIENCE, Michael ULg; Mathieu, Françoise; Li, Xiaowei et al

Conference (2015, September 18)

Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) is an endemic and chronic osteochondropathy whose etiology remains unclear. Environmental factors are assumed to be involved, among which the selenium and iodine deficiency is ... [more ▼]

Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) is an endemic and chronic osteochondropathy whose etiology remains unclear. Environmental factors are assumed to be involved, among which the selenium and iodine deficiency is frequently cited. The prevalence rate may be high in some rural areas of the Tibet Autonomous Region. The diet of the rural community is significantly different from the other communities (nomads and city-dwellers), who remains unaffected by KBD. Because their foods are mainly derived from local agriculture and artisanal production, their mineral composition may show significant discrepancies when compared with food composition data. The present survey aims at assessing the mineral dietary intakes of young Tibetan children living in rural areas endemic for the Kashin-Beck disease. A cross-sectional survey enrolling 250 children was carried out. The intakes were recorded for two days, on two different seasons, by the 24-hour food recall method. The minerals investigated were selected for their implication in bone metabolism and a specific food composition table was compiled from the China Food composition (book 1, 2nd edition), the USDA Food search for Windows (Version 1.0, Database version SR23), and a broad investigation on mineral composition of local and traditional Tibetan foods (Dermience et al., 2014). The calculation of daily intakes for the first season is now complete and some trends are emerging. Preliminary results suggest, inter alia, that the intakes of calcium are too low with unfavorable calcium to phosphorus ratio. On the contrary, sodium and manganese intakes are too high and could exceed tolerable upper levels. [less ▲]

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See detailSoluble biomarkers in OA: can they be used as indicator of HA re-injection?
Henrotin, Yves ULg

Conference (2015, September 18)

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See detailNid de coucou. De quelques performances filmées dans l'espace public.
Hamers, Jérémy ULg

Conference (2015, September 18)

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See detailGeophysics for the quantification of water fluxes in the soil-plant system
Garré, Sarah ULg; Binley, Andrew

Conference (2015, September 17)

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See detailThe system of sanctions for the illicit trade of nuclear goods
Colussi, Ilaria Anna ULg

Conference (2015, September 17)

In the area of nuclear non proliferation, the illicit trade of goods that could be used to create nuclear weapons cannot be neglected. Indeed, many States and non-States actors seeking nuclear weapons or ... [more ▼]

In the area of nuclear non proliferation, the illicit trade of goods that could be used to create nuclear weapons cannot be neglected. Indeed, many States and non-States actors seeking nuclear weapons or wanting to maintain existing nuclear weapons arsenals or capabilities look for obtaining, acquiring and transporting in their own States or locations dual-use technologies, items and materials. This entails a chain of “actors”: (a) the suppliers of goods, (b) a procurement organization, (c) a trade company for the procurement of goods, (d) intermediaries in transport, and (e) banks which could finance the operations. Therefore, a set of measures for preventing the illicit trade, and for sanctioning the occurred one, need to be defined. The paper aims at focusing on the “sanctioning” phase for illicit trade of dual-use nuclear items. It analyses the set of sanctions established at the international and European Union level, precisely the economic sanctions (e.g.: embargos), the financial one (i.e., freezing of assets), the visa and travel bans, and the limitations on transport of goods (i.e., export/import restrictions), by considering the legal texts adopted in the international and European Union framework, according to a comparative analysis. [less ▲]

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See detailworkshop:laryngoscopy hands on station
Finck, Camille ULg

Conference (2015, September 17)

training of a group of 20 endocrine surgeons to correctly perform a laryngeal examination in fibroscopy. Live examination of a patient suffering of laryngeal paralysis

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See detailBien soigner l'arthrose: un enjeu capital pour notre société!
Henrotin, Yves ULg

Conference (2015, September 17)

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See detailStability and Aging of Phase Change Materials : An Ab Initio Perspective
Raty, Jean-Yves ULg

Conference (2015, September 17)

Data recording with Phase Change Materials is a much studied topic as the writing/erasing characteristics, cyclability and downscaling properties of these materials allow for efficient data storage in ... [more ▼]

Data recording with Phase Change Materials is a much studied topic as the writing/erasing characteristics, cyclability and downscaling properties of these materials allow for efficient data storage in future generations of devices. Nevertheless, some aspects of phase change materials are limiting their performances and delaying their wider technological application. First, aging phenomena are common to all amorphous structures, but of special importance PCMs since it impedes the realization of multi-level memories. Different interpretations have been proposed, but we focus here on the structural relaxation of amorphous GeTe, chosen because it is the simplest system that is representative of the wider class of GST alloys, lying along the GeTe-Sb2Te3 composition line of the GeSbTe phase diagram. One difficulty encountered in the simulation of these amorphous systems is that the direct generation of an amorphous structure by quenching a liquid using Density Functional Theory (DFT) based Molecular Dynamics leads to one sample with a small number of atoms, and, hence of small number of atomic environments. Here we sample a large number of local atomic environments, corresponding to different bonding schemes, by chemically substituting different alloys, selected to favor different local atomic structures. This enables spanning a larger fraction of the configuration space relevant to aging. Our results support a model of the amorphous phase and its time evolution that involves an evolution of the local (chemical) order towards that of the crystal. On the other hand its electronic properties drift away from those of the crystal, driven by an increase of the Peierls-like distortion of the local environments in the amorphous, as compared to the crystal [1]. A second problem faced by PCMs is the fact that data recording is limited at high temperature due to the increased propensity to recrystallize. One approach to counter this is to stabilize the PCM using impurity atoms such as C or N. Using DFT and the analysis of the mechanical properties (constraints theory), we demonstrate how these impurity atoms modify the rigidity of the network, which is experimentally correlated with the activation energy for crystallization [2]. Finally, the crystal phase itself has been shown to have variable conductivities depending on the thermal history and annealing conditions. If this could be used profitably for multi-level recording, it also indicates that the crystal is undergoes some temporal evolution. Using DFT, we clarify the stability behavior of GST crystal and show that the metal-insulator transition is driven by the migration of intrinsic vacancies and an Anderson localization transition [3]. [1] J.Y Raty, W. Zhang, J. Luckas, C. Chen, R. Mazzarello, C. Bichara and M. Wuttig, Nat. Comm. (2015) [2] G. Ghezzi, J.Y. Raty, S. Maitrejean, A. Roule, E. Elkaim and F. Hippert, Applied Physics Letters, 99 (2011) 151906 [3] W. Zhang, A. Thiess, P. Zalden, R. Zeller, P. H. Dederichs, J-Y. Raty, M.Wuttig, S. Blügel et R. Mazzarello, Nature Materials 11 (2012) 952 [less ▲]

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See detailUse of dual carbon-chlorine isotope analysis to identify degradation pathways of 1,1,1-trichloroethane in groundwater
Palau, Jordi; Jamin, Pierre ULg; Badin, Alice et al

Conference (2015, September 17)

The high susceptibility of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) like 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) to be transformed via different competing pathways (biotic and abiotic) complicates the ... [more ▼]

The high susceptibility of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) like 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) to be transformed via different competing pathways (biotic and abiotic) complicates the assessment of their fate in groundwater. This knowledge is necessary to evaluate contaminant degradation and potential formation of toxic intermediates. Identifying pathways is further complicated in sites contaminated by mixed CAHs because some degradation products of 1,1,1-TCA can be formed from different precursors. Here, identification of pathways based solely on substrate-product concentration relationships may lead to ambiguous interpretations. This study investigates, for the first time, dual C−Cl isotope fractionation as a means of identifying and assessing degradation pathways of 1,1,1-TCA in groundwater. Distinctly different dual isotope trends (L = Δδ13C/Δδ37Cl) were observed for 1,1,1-TCA transformation via oxidation with heat-activated persulfate (L = ∞), reduction with zerovalent iron (L = 1.5 ± 0.1), hydrolysis and dehydrohalogenation (HY/DH, L = 0.33 ± 0.04) in laboratory experiments, illustrating the potential of a dual isotope approach. This approach was evaluated in an aerobic aquifer impacted by 1,1,1-TCA and trichloroethylene (TCE) with concentrations of up to 20 mg/L and 3.4 mg/L, respectively. For 1,1,1-TCA, the dual isotope slope determined from field samples (L = 0.6 ± 0.2, r2 = 0.75) was close to the slope observed for HY/DH in the laboratory (L = 0.33 ± 0.04), indicating that HY/DH was the predominant degradation pathway of 1,1,1-TCA in the aquifer. The observed deviation could be explained by a minor contribution of additional degradation processes. This result, along with the little degradation of TCE determined from isotope measurements, confirmed that 1,1,1-TCA was the main source of the 1,1-dichlorethylene (1,1-DCE) detected in the aquifer with concentrations of up to 10 mg/L. This study demonstrates that a dual C-Cl isotope approach can strongly improve the qualitative and quantitative assessment of 1,1,1-TCA degradation processes in the field. [less ▲]

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See detailSurgir dans le paysage urbain. Analyse sociocritique du projet Selfiecity
Hagelstein, Maud ULg

Conference (2015, September 17)

Mon intérêt pour le selfie s’inscrit dans le cadre d’une réflexion plus large sur la photographie vernaculaire (ou commune – au double sens du terme), c’est-à-dire celle qui n’est ni professionnelle, ni ... [more ▼]

Mon intérêt pour le selfie s’inscrit dans le cadre d’une réflexion plus large sur la photographie vernaculaire (ou commune – au double sens du terme), c’est-à-dire celle qui n’est ni professionnelle, ni explicitement artistique. Le selfie est un outil visuel qui me semble pouvoir bien fonctionner avec la thématique de l’espace urbain : *le selfie travaille à la mise en scène d’un sujet dans un contexte au sein duquel il s’implique, le sujet ayant ceci de particulier qu’il se constitue à la fois comme observateur d’une scène, opérateur de l’image (= opérateur de la représentation de cette scène) et comme figurant de celle-ci (partie de son contenu). *En tant qu’il indique donc bien souvent une interaction entre un sujet et son environnement (spatial, social), le selfie pourrait être un bon indicateur du rapport de figuration, d’intégration, liant l’homme à son espace urbain (direct ou indirect). Il m’intéressera ici pour une seconde raison (dont les enjeux sont plus directement politiques) : puisque le dispositif est relativement nouveau, en développement, le selfie peut servir en quelque sorte de laboratoire dans lequel on pourrait observer la constitution de normes formelles. Autrement dit, la nouveauté de cette forme d’expression lui permet d’échapper relativement (et sans doute provisoirement) à l’inévitable institutionnalisation progressive que connaît généralement l’art urbain. [less ▲]

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See detailPriniples of Voice production
Finck, Camille ULg

Conference (2015, September 17)

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See detailAnalytical performance of a biomarker: what the clinician should know
CAVALIER, Etienne ULg

Conference (2015, September 17)

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See detailBuilding bridges (preliminary steps towards a new dictionary of Ancient Egyptian)
Winand, Jean ULg

Conference (2015, September 16)

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See detailVocabulaire liturgique et strates lexicales en indo-iranien ancien
Swennen, Philippe ULg

Conference (2015, September 16)

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See detailEmpirical comparison of scoring rules at early stages of CAT
Magis, David ULg

Conference (2015, September 15)

Usual scoring rules in CATs include maximum likelihood (ML), weighted likelihood (WL) and Bayesian approaches. However, at early stages of adaptive testing, only a few item responses are available so the ... [more ▼]

Usual scoring rules in CATs include maximum likelihood (ML), weighted likelihood (WL) and Bayesian approaches. However, at early stages of adaptive testing, only a few item responses are available so the amount of information is very limited and in addition constant patterns (i.e. only correct or only incorrect responses) are often observed, yielding ML scoring intractable. Specific scoring rules (such as fixed- or variable stepsize adjustments) were developed for that purpose. However recent research highlighted that both Bayesian and WL scoring rules may provide finite values even with small sets of items. The purpose of this presentation is twofold: (a) to make a quick review of available scoring rules at early stages of CAT, and (b) to present empirical results from a simulation study that compares those scoring rules. More precisely, three scoring scenarios will be investigated: stepsize adjustment followed by ML, Bayes or WL followed by ML, and constant scoring rule throughout the CAT. These methods will be compared by means of simulated item banks and under various CAT scenarios for next item selection and stopping rules. Empirical results will be presented and practical guidelines for early stage scoring will be outlined. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards processes-based groundwater vulnerability assessments
Dassargues, Alain ULg; Popescu, Cristina; Brouyère, Serge ULg

Conference (2015, September 15)

Various groundwater vulnerability methods have recently been developed. Considering groundwater quality issues, the most common techniques are based on calculation of an index expressing the protective ... [more ▼]

Various groundwater vulnerability methods have recently been developed. Considering groundwater quality issues, the most common techniques are based on calculation of an index expressing the protective effect (i.e. in terms of solute contaminant transport) of underground formations overlying the groundwater resource (Gogu & Dassargues, 2000, Gogu et al., 2003)). However, there is a strong need for new methods giving more emphasis on the processes-based calculation of vulnerability indicators. As a first alternative, a method is proposed based on three factors describing a pollution event (Brouyère et al., 2001): (1) the transit time from the source to the target, (2) the duration of the contamination breakthrough at the target, (3) the ratio between the maximum concentration at the target to the released concentration at the contamination source. The method can feature the impact of surface runoff to preferential infiltration points. Practically, the assessment can then be based on the simulated breakthrough curves at the ‘target’ corresponding to Dirac-type solicitations (Popescu et al., 2008). Different vulnerability maps can be built according to the relative importance conventionally given to each of the three factors. This concept allows a clear distinction between conventional aspects and processes-based results in the building of a final vulnerability indicator. A second proposal consists in reframing the groundwater vulnerability assessment in a Pressure-State-Impact causal chain that is familiar to decision makers (Beaujean et al., 2013). The method is here based on the calculation of sensitivity coefficients for a user-defined groundwater state for which several physically-based indicators are proposed. The sensitivity coefficients reflect the easiness with which the groundwater state transmits pressures into impacts. They are converted to vulnerability, using the concept of ‘transgressing a given threshold’ (Luers et al., 2003). While the methodology is general and can be applied in quantity as quality issues, the choice of causal chains has to be made prior to the calculation. The vulnerability is also related to a damaged state and is related to the ‘distance’ between the current state and a given threshold. Here also, the method allows a clear distinction between conventional choices (threshold) and scientific work (Dassargues et al., 2009). [less ▲]

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See detailQuestions à Nancy Fraser : Production et Reproduction du capital
Ghanbari Matin, Soheil ULg

Conference (2015, September 15)

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See detailSharing in neuroimaging: collecting with Brainmap, quantitatively analysing and sharing with ANIMA
Genon, Sarah ULg; Reid, Andrew; Eickhoff, Simon

Conference (2015, September 14)

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See detailCorporate Board Attributes and CAC: A Comparative Study of France, Germany and UK
Boussaid, Nabila ULg; Hamza, Taher; Sougné, Danielle ULg

Conference (2015, September 14)

This paper investigates the impact of corporate board of directors’ attributes on conditional accounting conservatim in the French, German and British contexts. Using pooled regression model over the ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates the impact of corporate board of directors’ attributes on conditional accounting conservatim in the French, German and British contexts. Using pooled regression model over the period 2009-2012, our findings report that the relationship between corporate board attributes and accounting conservatism is country dependent. First, regarding the board composition, we find that the effect of board size is positive for German firms, negative for French firms and insignificant for British firms. We also document a positive association between board independence and accounting conservatism for British firms. However, we find no evidence of a positive association between codetermination and earnings conservatism in German context. Second, female seats on board seem to increase conservative reporting in financial statement only for French firms. Lastly, board meeting frequency in French and British firms appears to increase accounting conservatism. As a robustness test, we use an alternative measure of accounting conservatism namely, time–series of earnings changes measure and confirm the previous results. Overall, our results reveal that corporate board affects the financial reporting quality. [less ▲]

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See detail18FDG-PET/CT IMAGING IN SUSPECTED ACUTE RENAL ALLOGRAFT REJECTION
LOVINFOSSE, Pierre ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BOVY, Christophe ULg et al

Conference (2015, September 13)

The diagnosis procedure for kidney transplant recipients (KTR) with suspected acute rejection (AR) relies on needle biopsy. Noninvasive tests to predict nonrejection would be preferable. AR is associated ... [more ▼]

The diagnosis procedure for kidney transplant recipients (KTR) with suspected acute rejection (AR) relies on needle biopsy. Noninvasive tests to predict nonrejection would be preferable. AR is associated with a recruitment of activated leukocytes into the transplant, which are characterized by a high metabolic activity and an increased uptake of glucose analog, Fluoro-deoxyglucose ( FDG). Thus, FDG-Positron emission tomography coupled with computed tomography (PET/CT) may help noninvasively distinguish nonrejection from AR. From January 2013 to February 2015, we prospectively performed 32 FDGPET/ CT in 31 adult KTR with suspected renal AR who underwent a biopsy. Biopsies were categorized as “normal”, “borderline”, “AR” or “others” according to Banff classification. PET/CT imaging was performed within 201 ± 18 minutes after i.v. administration of 3.2 ± 0.2 MBq/kg of FDG, before any modification of immunosuppression. The mean standard uptake values (SUV) of both upper and lower renal poles were measured, with no threshold activity. Biopsies were diagnosed as “normal”, “borderline”, “AR” or “others” in 8, 10, 8 and 6 (including 3 polyoma-BK nephropathies) cases. Mean SUV respectively reached 1.5 ± 0.2, 1.6 ± 0.3, 2.9 ± 0.8, 2.2 ± 1.2 in each category. Mean SUV of biopsy-proven AR was significantly higher than “normal” cases (p<0.01). No difference was found between “normal” vs. “borderline”, or between “AR” vs. “others” histopathology. Still, a positive correlation between mean SUV and acute composite (g+i+t+v+ptc) Banff score was found, with a coefficient of 0.70 (p<0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in detecting pathological biospies were respectively 92.3% and 36.8%, with a mean SUV threshold at 1.4. FDG-PET/CT imaging may help discriminate nonrejection, thereby avoiding unnecessary transplant biopsy in KTR with suspected AR. [less ▲]

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See detailWill Big Data Deliver its Promised Productivity Growth?
Artige, Lionel ULg

Conference (2015, September 11)

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See detailGreen synthesis of polyphosphoesters, a promising class of bioinspired degradable materials
Lecomte, Philippe ULg; Baeten, Evelien

Conference (2015, September 11)

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See detailTentativi di avvicinamento a Il figlio di Bakunìn (1991) di Sergio Atzeni (1952-1995)
Curreri, Luciano ULg

Conference (2015, September 11)

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See detailPredator cues and risky habitats affect foraging activity in salamanders
Melotto, Andrea; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco; Denoël, Mathieu ULg et al

Conference (2015, September 11)

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See detailCe que l'image fait à l'histoire
Havelange, Carl ULg

Conference (2015, September 11)

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See detailL'utilisation des insectes dans la pharmacopée de l'Égypte gréco-romaine
Marganne, Marie-Hélène ULg

Conference (2015, September 11)

Telles qu'on peut les déchiffrer dans les papyrus littéraires grecs retrouvés en Égypte (IV/IIIe siècles avant notre ère – VI/VIIe siècles de notre ère), les prescriptions médicales recourent-elles à des ... [more ▼]

Telles qu'on peut les déchiffrer dans les papyrus littéraires grecs retrouvés en Égypte (IV/IIIe siècles avant notre ère – VI/VIIe siècles de notre ère), les prescriptions médicales recourent-elles à des insectes et, si tel est le cas, à quelle(s) variété(s), en raison de quelle(s) propriété(s) et pour quel(s) type(s) d'affections ? C'est à ces questions que l'on tentera de répondre, en complétant le témoignage des sources papyrologiques par celui des sources littéraires grecques et latines sur la pharmacopée de l'Égypte gréco-romaine. [less ▲]

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See detailNumerical crashworthiness analysis of an offshore wind turbine monopile impacted by a ship
Bela, Andreea ULg

Conference (2015, September 11)

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See detailDéception et incertitude en démocratie
Jamin, Jérôme ULg

Conference (2015, September 10)

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See detailOsteopontin as a new target in glioblastoma progression and resistance to radiotherapy
Henry, Aurélie ULg; Bellahcene, Akeila ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg et al

Conference (2015, September 10)

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive and common solid human brain tumor. Because of GBM heterogeneity, location and aggressiveness, none of the available treatment is curative. These treatments ... [more ▼]

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive and common solid human brain tumor. Because of GBM heterogeneity, location and aggressiveness, none of the available treatment is curative. These treatments include maximal surgical resection, radiotherapy and concomitant or adjuvant chemotherapy with Temozolomide (TMZ). However, the prognosis of adult patients with GBM remains poor and the survival outcome after treatment does not exceed 15 months. Glioblastoma-composing cells have developed many strategies to counteract these current therapies. Among the wide hallmarks acquired to survive, osteopontin (OPN) ranks correlates with lower overall and disease-free/relapse-free survival in all tumors combined, as well in brain cancer. OPN expression is largely considered as a molecular cancer marker associated with poor prognosis for patients with cancer. Our preliminary works (Lamour V and Henry A, IJC 2015) have demonstrated the role of OPN in the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells and its importance in the maintenance of the stem charachters. Within the continuance of this work, our recent studies focused on the potential role of OPN in the resistance of glioblastoma cells to radiotherapy and its implication in the initiation of Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) repair mechanism. In this context, U251-MG and U87-MG cells were used to assess the role of OPN in the initiation of the DSBs repair mechanism after an exposure to gamma-irradiation (γ–IR). The transient transfection of both cell lines with siRNA directed against OPN shown a lower induction of γ–H2AX compared to control (irrelevant siRNA). The survival of U251-OPN depleted cells was also affected after an exposure to γ–IR (based on clonogenic assays). However, the sole depletion of OPN in U87 cells affected their survival (independently of the γ–IR). To prove that the secreted form of OPN is necessary to survive after γ–IR, conditionned medium of U87-shSCR clones (rich in OPN) was used to treat U87shOPN clones before an exposure to γ–IR. By immunofluorescence, we observed that the γ–H2AX staining was higher in U87 shOPN clones than when treated with their own conditionned medium (poor in OPN). Currently, we are investigating the in vivo implication of OPN in the initiation of DSBs repair mechanism after an exposure of mice to γ–IR (whole brain exposure). For this purpose, IPTG-inducible U87 shRNA clones (SCR and OPN) have been generated and validated for an orthotopic xenograft model in NOD-SCID mice. The survival after a radiotherapy of 10 Gy (2Gy per day for 5 days) will be assessed in OPN-positive and –negative tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, these datas suggest that OPN could represent an important pronostic factor for patient response to radiotherapy in the context of GBM. [less ▲]

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See detailNewts skip aquatic life and forego reproduction in response to alien fish introduction
Winandy, Laurane ULg; Darnet, Elodie; Denoël, Mathieu ULg

Conference (2015, September 10)

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See detailNumerical simulations on embedded solids : integration of CAD and eXtended Finite Element Analysis
Duboeuf, Frédéric ULg; Béchet, Eric ULg

Conference (2015, September 10)

The aim of this communication is to propose a procedure in order to dissociate the geometric description of the field’s approximation within the extended finite element method (X-FEM) and with non ... [more ▼]

The aim of this communication is to propose a procedure in order to dissociate the geometric description of the field’s approximation within the extended finite element method (X-FEM) and with non-matching meshes. Implicit and explicit approaches are combined in order to represent with accuracy all the CAD entities regardless of their dimension. The choice of appropriate tools such as Level Sets technique allows to describe evolving interfaces with great flexibility. The design of a dedicated P1 functional space is achieved by decimating the traces of standard finite element (FE) shape functions, thanks to a new algorithm, especially when the problem domain is embedded in a space of a higher dimension. An analysis of the approximation properties of the P1 FE trace spaces on hyper-surfaces is available in the literature and applied for solving PDEs on closed surfaces without boundary. Dirichlet boundary conditions are applied using a convenient choice of stable Lagrange multiplier space, according to a new generalized algorithm. That extends the existing solutions to every combination of the space domain and boundary dimensions. In terms of solvers, the introduction of double Lagrange multipliers can be used to recover the positive definiteness of the bilinear form. This approach allows to treat any embedding, i.e. 1, 2, or 3D problems embedded in 2 or 3D background meshes. The possibility of applying the methodology to beams is investigated, with a potential application to through-thickness reinforced composites in a mixed-dimensional modelling framework. [less ▲]

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See detailChallenges for Scale-Up of Batch Phase Separation
Pfennig, Andreas ULg; Becker, Karsten; Bach, S. et al

Conference (2015, September 10)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (2 ULg)
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See detailReevaluating IUCN Red List assesment on European amphibians
Crnobrnja-Isailović, Jelka; Cogalniceanu, Dan; Denoël, Mathieu ULg et al

Conference (2015, September 09)

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See detailStudy of the impact of school average ability on career expectations
Dupont, Virginie ULg

Conference (2015, September 09)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (2 ULg)
See detailPractical training session on virus discovery from High Throughput Sequencing data
Massart, Sébastien ULg

Conference (2015, September 09)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)