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See detailDomestic tools, hafting, and the evolution of technology: The Upper Palaeolithic of Hohle Fels as a case study
Taipale, Noora ULg; Conard, Nicholas J.; Rots, Veerle ULg

Poster (2016, September)

Innovations relevant to human evolution often involve subsistence technology, which can affect the success of individual groups, and Homo sapiens in general. However, Palaeolithic technologies include ... [more ▼]

Innovations relevant to human evolution often involve subsistence technology, which can affect the success of individual groups, and Homo sapiens in general. However, Palaeolithic technologies include more than just hunting tools, and a proper understanding of hunter-gatherer ways of living requires knowledge of the organisation of diverse tasks and activities, including the manufacture and maintenance of tools and other equipment. One central aspect of technological evolution is the development of tool hafting [1, 2], which is not only restricted to hunting and gathering implements, but also affects so-called domestic tool categories. We present the results of an on-going project that focuses on hafting and use of stone tools in the Upper Palaeolithic through detailed functional analysis of selected assemblages from European key sites (Hohle Fels, Abri Pataud, Maisières-Canal), which have yielded rich lithic and organic assemblages from secure chronological contexts. Here the focus is on classic Upper Palaeolithic tool categories, such as endscrapers and burins, from the Gravettian and Magdalenian levels of the cave site Hohle Fels (Germany) [3, 4]. We suggest that domestic tools can offer a valuable source material, since for most of them, hafting is not a necessity as it is for spear and arrow tips. An increase in hafting implies an increase in time investment, which has implications for task organisation and specialisation. The Hohle Fels assemblage offers an interesting case study for temporal changes (or continuity) in the frequency and techniques of tool hafting. The projectile technology shows a clear shift from the Gravettian to the Magadalenian, marked by the introduction of a microlithic technology (backed bladelets). For other tool categories, the changes seem more subtle. Our goal is to characterise the tools used in manufacture and maintenance tasks, and to evaluate whether the Gravettian to Magdalenian transition witnesses changes in tool design and use that go beyond hunting equipment. The observed differences between tool classes and time periods are explained with a reference to details of tool use, such as the rate of edge wear development and stone tool exhaustion, as well as shifts in treatment of organic raw materials. The results suggest that domestic tools can aid in understanding long-term technological evolution, and create a baseline against which we can (re)assess the role of shifts observed in technologies that are more susceptible to morphological change, such as projectiles. References: [1] Rots, V., 2013. Insights into early Middle Palaeolithic tool use and hafting in Western Europe: The functional analysis of level IIa of the early Middle Palaeolithic site of Biache-Saint-Vaast (France). J. Archaeol. Sci. 40, 497–506. [2] Barham, L., 2013. From Hand to Handle: The First Industrial Revolution. Oxford University Press, Oxford. [3] Conard, N. J., Bolus, M., 2003. Radiocarbon dating the appearance of modern humans and timing of cultural innovations in Europe: New results and new challenges. J. Hum. Evol. 44, 331–371. [4] Taller, A., Bolus, M., Conard, N. J., 2014. The Magdalenian of Hohle Fels Cave and the Resettlement of the Swabian Jura after the LGM. In: Otte, M., Le Brun-Ricalens, F. (Eds.), Modes de contacts et de déplacements au Paléolithique eurasiatique: Actes du Colloque international de la commission 8 (Paléolithique supérieur) de l'UISPP, Université de Liège, 28–31 mai 2012. Centre National de Recherche Archéologique, Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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See detailMonitoring topography of laboratory fluvial dike models subjected to breaching based on a laser profilometry technique
Rifai, Ismail ULg; Erpicum, Sébastien ULg; Archambeau, Pierre ULg et al

in International Symposium on River Sedimentation: Stuttgart 19th-22d september 2016 (2016, September)

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See detailFunctional properties of extracellular polysaccharides produced by Enterobacter A47 grown on agro-food industry by-products
Antunes, Silvia; Freitas, Filomena; Alves, Vitor et al

Poster (2016, September)

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See detailComparative analysis of the respiratory microbiota of healthy dogs and dogs with canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
Roels, Elodie ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Darnis, Elodie ULg et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2016, September)

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See detailThe BCCM/ULC collection to conserve and study the biodiversity of Polar cyanobacteria
Wilmotte, Annick ULg; Renard, Marine ULg; Lara, Yannick ULg et al

Poster (2016, September)

The BCCM/ULC public collection of Cyanobacteria has been funded since 2011 by the Belgian Science Policy Office. BCCM/ULC is currently holding 226 cyanobacterial strains, with 119 being of Antarctic ... [more ▼]

The BCCM/ULC public collection of Cyanobacteria has been funded since 2011 by the Belgian Science Policy Office. BCCM/ULC is currently holding 226 cyanobacterial strains, with 119 being of Antarctic origin (including 3 from the sub-Antarctic). The cyanobacteria constitute the bacterial phylum with the largest morphological diversity and their taxonomy is still a work in progress. In Polar Regions, Cyanobacteria represent key primary producers and are important drivers of the food webs in a wide range of aquatic to terrestrial habitats. For example, they build extensive benthic microbial mats in lakes and soil crusts in terrestrial biotopes. They have adapted to their environment, and may present interesting features to survive freeze/thaw cycles, seasonally contrasted light intensities, high UV radiations, dessication and other stresses. In this poster, we present the results of the 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis for 76 Antarctic strains. This allows us to illustrate the diversity present in the collection, to detect lineages for which no genome has yet been sequenced, and to pinpoint taxonomic problems that should be addressed in a more comprehensive study. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in crop yields, soil organic carbon and soil nitrogen content under climate change and variable management practices"
Dumont, Benjamin ULg; Basso, Bruno; Shcherbak, Iurii et al

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailWhen to use locking implants?
Balligand, Marc ULg

in Proceedings of the 18th ESVOT congress (2016, September)

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See detailBinary Phase Behavior of Saturated Triacylglycerols containing Stearic and Palmitic Acid
Bhaggan, Krishnadath ULg; Smith, K.W.; Blecker, Christophe ULg et al

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailMethodology to model the energy vulnerability of households in Europe based on the current mapping of fuel poverty and transport poverty and its likely evolution until 2040
Pierson, Charlotte; Reiter, Sigrid ULg

Conference (2016, September)

Fuel poverty refers to a situation in which an individual or household is not able to meet their basic energy needs. Fuel poverty is currently growing in the European Union. Research in this field is ... [more ▼]

Fuel poverty refers to a situation in which an individual or household is not able to meet their basic energy needs. Fuel poverty is currently growing in the European Union. Research in this field is often limited to the assessment of the current risk of fuel poverty based on energy consumptions due to housing. Urban sprawl generates a significant increase in energy consumption related to daily mobility, which generates energy poverty related to transportation needs. This article presents a methodology for modeling the current and future energy poverty of households in Europe on the basis of energy consumptions due to housing, to daily mobility and their combination. Indicators for fuel poverty and transport poverty will be based on Hills’ method, which is widely recognized internationally for fuel poverty assessment and which takes into account two thresholds: energy expenses of households and their available residual income. This article will outline the spatial modeling process of energy costs due to dwellings and mobility thanks to the coupling of a GIS tool, cadastral datasets, existing methods for the assessment of buildings and transport energy consumptions and updated databases (EPB certificates, detailed mobility surveys, data from smart meters, mobile phones and GPS). Different scenarios will be selected to predict the evolution of fuel and transport poverty until 2040 on the basis of national and European prospective studies or, alternatively, based on the historical evaluation of some key parameters and their extrapolation. The evolution of built-up areas will be model thanks to the multinomial logistic regression model (MLR) that enables to visualize the consequence of different urban densities expansion. The different parameters that will influence the evolution of fuel and transport poverty until 2040 will be highlighted (climate change, urban expansion, fuel prices, energy performance of buildings and vehicles, etc.). [less ▲]

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See detailUse of NIR hyperspectral imaging to detect and quantify nodules on root system of associated crops
Eylenbosch, Damien ULg; Pierreux, Jérome ULg; Fernández Pierna, Juan Antonio et al

in ESA 14 -Growing landscape - Cultivating innovative agricultural systems (2016, September)

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See detailStudy of Meta-Analysis Strategies for Network Inference using Information-Theoretic Approaches
Pham, Cam Ngoc ULg; Haibe-Kains; Bellot, Pau et al

in IEEE Dexa workshops 2016 (2016, September)

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See detailProcess oriented characterisation of oolitic iron concentrate during dephosphorisation by roasting and leaching
Ionkov, Krassimir; Gomes, Otavio; Neumann, Reiner et al

in Proceedings of the XXVIII International Mineral Processing Congress (IMPC 2016) (2016, September)

Phosphorus in iron ores is considered as a deleterious component to iron making reflecting in cold shortness of the produced steel. The present study investigates the phosphorus migration pattern ... [more ▼]

Phosphorus in iron ores is considered as a deleterious component to iron making reflecting in cold shortness of the produced steel. The present study investigates the phosphorus migration pattern resulting from thermal treatment of an oolitic-type iron concentrate with and without additives. To this end focused mineralogical and microscopic observations were performed. The results have shown that roasting with alkaline additive drives phosphorus outside the hematite hosting mineral, however it remains evenly distributed inside the volume of the oolites. It penetrates inside the newly formed cementing phases of Al-Na-Si-Fe-type and also fills the interstices between the crystals. Other than phosphorus, aluminum, calcium and iron tend also to migrate towards the amorphous-type cementing phase. Finally, the possibilities for P removal by means of magnetic separation and acid leaching of the roasted concentrate were evaluated. The obtained final product presents a standard iron concentrate suitable for steelmaking with its phosphorous being dropped from 0.71% to 0.05% and iron grade of a nearly 66% being reached. [less ▲]

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See detailPlant esterified oxylipins: structure – function relationship
Genva, Manon ULg; Andersson, Mats X.; Nasir, Mehmet Nail ULg et al

Poster (2016, September)

In the present work, high quantities of arabidopsides were extracted and purified from Arabidopsis thaliana L.

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See detailFiber technology, rope-making, textiles and the Lochstäbe from the Aurignacian of the Swabian Jura
Conard, Nicholas; Rots, Veerle ULg

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailEngineering education at the heart of the Raw Materials Value Chain
Pirard, Eric ULg; Sonnemann, Guido

in Mazijn, Bernard (Ed.) Proceedings 8th Conference on Engineering Education for Sustainable Development (2016, September)

EIT Raw Materials has the mission to reinforce Europe’s innovation capacity by preparing the entrepreneurs and innovators of tomorrow. By fully integrating the three sides of the knowledge triangle ... [more ▼]

EIT Raw Materials has the mission to reinforce Europe’s innovation capacity by preparing the entrepreneurs and innovators of tomorrow. By fully integrating the three sides of the knowledge triangle (education, research and industry), the EIT Raw Materials aims at boosting the innovation process: from idea to product; from lab to market and from student to entrepreneur. A key mission of the EIT Raw Materials is to educate young professionals and specifically engineers and scientists by breaking the barriers of classical disciplines. The so-called T-shaped professional will have a strong entrepreneurial mindset and combine an in depth knowledge of his own discipline with a sound understanding of the challenges appearing along the whole raw materials value chain, such as exploration, extraction and processing of primary resources, recycling of secondary resources and substitution of critical and toxic materials. It is essential that these T-shaped professionals understand their role within the value chain as actors of a more circular economy. Every educational activity organized under the umbrella of the EIT Raw Materials (RM) Academy will therefore make sure to involve all stakeholders of the raw materials value chain and to contribute to raising awareness with respect to the societal function of raw materials and the related supply and availability challenges. To achieve these missions and create a long lasting impact, the RM Academy aims to innovate in terms of teaching, which includes: • The promotion of problem-based learning, self organisation and learning by doing. • The offer of an open learning environment and a series of online courses. • Enabling a high degree of mobility of students and professionals. • Facilitating access to experimental platforms and pilot plants for hands-on training • Adopting a strong multidisciplinary approach (e.g. joint courses across sectors) • Thinking beyond boundaries and systematically exploring and generating new ideas • Transforming innovations into feasible business solutions • Joint curriculum development Critical reflection, peer review processes as well as assessments and collegial discussions under the roof of the EIT Raw Material Academy will be used for continuing quality development of the programs. [less ▲]

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See detailNonlinear vibration analysis of the SmallSat spacecraft: From identification to design
Detroux, Thibaut ULg; Noël, Jean-Philippe ULg; Masset, Luc ULg et al

Conference (2016, September)

The objective of the present contribution is to introduce nonlinear experimental and numerical tools and methods applicable to real-life structures. The study is illustrated using the SmallSat spacecraft ... [more ▼]

The objective of the present contribution is to introduce nonlinear experimental and numerical tools and methods applicable to real-life structures. The study is illustrated using the SmallSat spacecraft developed by Airbus Defence and Space, which possesses several localized nonlinearities. The computation of nonlinear normal modes and bifurcations reveals that the satellite possesses complex dynamics including modal interactions, quasiperiodic oscillations and isolated resonances. [less ▲]

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See detailValeurs de référence de débit de filtration glomérulaire en population noire-africaine
Yayo, E; Monnet, D; Attoungbré, M.-L. et al

in Néphrologie & Thérapeutique (2016, September), 12(5), 273

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See detailPresentation of germplasm Health Unit-Gembloux
Massart, Sébastien ULg

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailInvestigation of the coagulation system in canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
Roels, Elodie ULg; Bauer, N.; Lecut, Ch. et al

Poster (2016, September)

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See detailMeeting in Brackets - Devising Belgian Mental Health Policies through Inter-organisational Meetings
Thunus, Sophie ULg

Conference (2016, September)

Object: this paper analyses inter-organisational meetings held in response to a reform of the Belgian mental health care system. It proposes to shift the researcher’s attention from the instrumental ... [more ▼]

Object: this paper analyses inter-organisational meetings held in response to a reform of the Belgian mental health care system. It proposes to shift the researcher’s attention from the instrumental function attributed to meetings to the role they actually play in this reform. Aims: based on the observation that meetings frequently failed to reach their instrumental outcome, this paper first asks which other roles meetings might play and how. Second, it suggests that the concept of bracketing might be helpful in perceiving, describing and analysing the roles played by meetings. Methods: this paper relies on empirical material collected through semi-structured interviews, direct observation and documentary analyse. Excerpts from interviews and field notes of observation are used as a basis for analysing 4 specific meetings. These meetings have been selected according to their relevance to the research question of the role played by meetings and a set of criteria relating to the meeting type, participants, topic and context. Results: this paper demonstrates that, next to their instrumental function, meetings play at least three complementary roles, which are defined as expressive, representative and performative. It argues that these three roles of meetings are better understood by using the concept of bracketing in three ways: as a methodological, descriptive and analytical tool. [less ▲]

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See detailUtilisation of CO2 from an Industrial source for Methanol production
Font-Palma, Carolina; Douven, Sigrid ULg; Léonard, Grégoire ULg

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailLes aménagements immobiliers. Problèmes d'identification et d'interprétation
Mas, Juliette ULg

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailClinically relevant optical properties of three types of intraocular lenses
Gatinel, Damien; Loicq, Jerôme ULg

Conference (2016, September)

Purpose: To experimentally compare the optical performance of three types of hydrophobic intraocular lenses (IOLs): extended depth of focus (TECNIS Symfony), bifocal (TECNIS ZMB00), and trifocal ... [more ▼]

Purpose: To experimentally compare the optical performance of three types of hydrophobic intraocular lenses (IOLs): extended depth of focus (TECNIS Symfony), bifocal (TECNIS ZMB00), and trifocal (FineVision GFree). Setting: Rothschild Foundation Paris, France - Liege Space Center Liège, Belgique Methods: Surface topography was analyzed by optical microscopy. Modulation transfer function (MTF) and spherical aberrations were determined on optical bench for variable pupil apertures and with two cornea models (0 µm and +0.28 µm). United States Air Force target imaging was analyzed for different focal points (near, intermediate, and far). Point spread function (PSF) and halos were quantified and compared. Results: All lenses presented step-like optic topography. For a pupil size of = 3 mm, distinctive MTF peaks were observed for all lenses: two peaks for the extended depth of focus and bifocal lenses with +1.75 and +4.00 diopters (D) addition, respectively, and three peaks for the trifocal lens with +1.75 and +3.50 addition for intermediate and near vision, respectively. The extended depth of focus and bifocal lens had slightly higher MTF at best focus with the +0.28 µm cornea model than with the 0 µm model, whereas the trifocal lens was likely to be more independent of the corneal spherical aberrations. Conclusions: Each lens appears to rely on light diffraction for optical performance, presenting halos with comparable intensities. For small pupil apertures, the MTF peaks for the far and intermediate focal distances of the trifocal and extended depth of focus lenses overlap, but the trifocal lens presented an additional MTF peak for the near focal points. [less ▲]

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See detailIsolation of bacteriophages against Klebsiella pneumoniae and in vivo activity
Thiry, Damien ULg; Passet, Virginie; Dufour, Nicolas et al

Poster (2016, September)

Klebsiella pneumoniae is a bacterial pathogen able to induce severe healthcare-associated or community-acquired infections in humans and animals. The constant emergence of antibiotic resistant strains ... [more ▼]

Klebsiella pneumoniae is a bacterial pathogen able to induce severe healthcare-associated or community-acquired infections in humans and animals. The constant emergence of antibiotic resistant strains reinforces the need to find alternatives to antibiotic treatments. The use of bacteriophages is a promising approach. The aim of this study was to isolate bacteriophages directed against K. pneumoniae strains and to test their efficacy in a murine model. Bacteriophages against five different K. pneumoniae (2 of capsular type K1 and K2 and 1 undetermined) were isolated and purified from waste water collected in Paris area. The morphology of plaques (zones of bacterial killing) was recorded and several of them were purified three times by successive replating. Phage titers were determined by serial dilutions on their respective hosts as well as on 18 other Klebsiella strains to identify their host range. Kinetics of bacterial lysis were monitored during 15h at 3 multiplicities of infection, in triplicates. For in vivo experiment, a total of 10 mice were inoculated with 200 µl of K. pneumoniae (4.6E+07 CFU) by oral gavage and the level of K. pneumoniae in fecal samples was monitored for 10 days. Five mice did not receive any treatment and 5 other mice received a cocktail of three bacteriophages (8E+07 PFU) at day 4 post-inoculation. A total of 54 bacteriophages were isolated and purified with titers ranging from 2E+5 to 3.6E+10 PFU/ml. The host range study showed that bacteriophages against K. pneumoniae have a specificity related to the capsular type of their bacterial host. Lysis kinetics of bacteria suggested that different phages were isolated. Despite difficulties with the murine intestinal model, evidence was obtained that bacteriophages are able to reduce intestinal carriage. Our results show that bacteriophages isolated against K. pneumoniae are specific for a given capsular type, although further studies are necessary to provide more details on this capsular specificity and its molecular determinants. To fully address the in vivo potential of phages, a reliable mouse model of intestinal carriage of K. pneumoniae strains needs to be established. [less ▲]

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See detailThere is more to life than subsistence: use-wear and residue analyses on pre-Still Bay stone tools at Sibudu
Rots, Veerle ULg; Lentfer, Carol ULg; Schmid, Viola et al

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailThe added value of new GNSS to monitor the ionosphere
Warnant, René ULg; Deprez, Cécile ULg; Van de Vyvere, Laura

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailIdentification of bovine and porcine colistin-resistant mcr1-positive Escherichia coli.
Mainil, Jacques ULg; Muylaert, Adeline ULg; Saulmont, Marc et al

Conference (2016, September)

OBJECTIVE Polymyxins, especially colistin, have been used for years in veterinary medicine and were rediscovered a few years ago as last resort antibiotics in human medicine against multi-resistant Gram ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE Polymyxins, especially colistin, have been used for years in veterinary medicine and were rediscovered a few years ago as last resort antibiotics in human medicine against multi-resistant Gram negative bacterial pathogens. For years, only chromosome-mediated resistance to colistin was identified as a consequence of mutation(s) in lipid A-encoding genes. Recently, however, a plasmid-located gene (mcr1) was identified in Gram-negative enterobacteria and has since been found by PCR in several, but not all, bovine, human, porcine and poultry colistin-resistant Escherichia coli (Liu YY et al. Lancet Infect Dis, 2016, 16(2), 161-168; Nordmann P and Poirel L. Clin Microbiol Infect, 2016, 22, 398-400 ; Schwarz S and Johnson AP. J Antimicrob Chemother, 2016, in press, doi: 10.1093/jac/dkw274). The purpose of this study was to compare phenotypic and genetic for the detection of resistance to colistin and of the mcr1 gene in a collection of Escherichia coli isolated from different animal species and from humans. METHODS More than 3000 E. coli isolates from cattle, pigs, dogs, cats, horses, rabbits, chickens ducks and humans were tested for resistance to colistin by growing them on agar plates with 1g/ml of colistin. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) of and the presence of the mcr1 gene in all growing isolates were determined using the E test® and colony hybridization assay with a mcr1 specific gene probe, respectively. The probe-positive isolates were further tested with the mcr1 gene specific PCR. RESULTS A total of 410 E. coli isolated grew on 1g/ml colistin-containing agar plates. The majority of isolates grew well, but several grew sparsely with only few isolated colonies. As determined by the E test®, MIC of 273 isolates (67%) was 1g/ml of colistin and higher; conversely, MIC of 137 isolates (33%) was lower than 1g/ml of colistin. Of those 410 E. coli isolates, 34 from pigs and bovines (9% of isolates growing on colistin-containing agar plates; 25% of isolates with MIC higher than 1g/ml) hybridized with the mcr1 gene-derived probe: 5 from pigs and 11 from bovines gave black spots (including five from the same calf), while 18 from pigs and one from bovine gave grey spots. All but one pig isolate had a MIC between 1.5 and 16 g/ml of colistin. Fifteen “black spot” probe-positive isolates tested positive with the mcr1 gene specific PCR as did 3 porcine “grey spot” probe-positive isolates, while the remaining 16 isolates repeatedly tested negative even after lowering the annealing temperature. CONCLUSION This study confirms that (i) the results of phenotypic assays for the detection of colistin resistance can not be always trusted; (ii) the mcr1 gene is not the only one mechanism of resistance to colistin; (iii) mcr1 variants may exist that can not be detected by the classical PCR. Phenotypic assays like growth on colistin-containing agar plates can still represent a first base screening assay, although the MIC determination using the E test® confirms a >1g/ml MIC for only 2 out of 3 growing isolates. Presence of mcr1 gene and putative variants (like the most recently described mcr2 gene; Xavier BB et al., Eurosurveillance, 21, 7 July 2016) in all probe-positive isolates will be confirmed after Whole Genome Sequencing that will also allow comparing the mcr1-positive plasmids and isolates from pigs and cattle to similar human E. coli isolates. Further studies should also be performed to identify the colistin resistance mechanism in mec-negative isolates. [less ▲]

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See detailProduction of word stress by French speaking CLIL and non-CLIL learners of Dutch
Hiligsmann, Philippe; Rasier, Laurent ULg; Degrave, Pauline

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailTargeted mutagenesis of orphan GPCRs of the SREB family
Laschet, Céline ULg; Dupuis, Nadine ULg; Soni, Arvind ULg et al

Poster (2016, September)

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See detailRadioscopy laboratory diagnostic of epizootic diseases in Belgium and European countries
Cargnel, Mickaël ULg; Roelandt, Sophie; Van der Stede, Yves et al

Poster (2016, September)

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See detailSensitivity of the regional climate model ALARO-0 to land surface changes
Berckmans, Julie; Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULg; Jacquemin, Ingrid ULg et al

Poster (2016, September)

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See detailEpidemiology and Molecular Variability of little cherry virus in Belgium
Tahzima, Rachid; Peusens, Gertie; Belïen, Tim et al

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailEnzymatic interesterification for the formulation of high quality zero trans fats from rapeseed oil
Gibon, V.; Closset, S.; Maes, J. et al

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailHeart Team Liege - Session Video Link
PIERARD, Luc ULg; vahanian, Alec; LANCELLOTTI, Patrizio ULg et al

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailIdentification of virulotypes and serotypes of enteropathogenic (EPEC) and Shigatoxigenic (STEC) Escherichia coli from healthy cattle at slaughterhouses in Wallonia.
Takaki, Shino; Duprez, Jean-Noël ULg; Fakih, Ibrahim et al

Poster (2016, September)

Escherichia coli producing the attachment-effacement (AE) lesion (EPEC) and/or Shiga toxins (STEC) cause enteritis and (bloody) diarrhoea in young calves and in humans, and are also present in the ... [more ▼]

Escherichia coli producing the attachment-effacement (AE) lesion (EPEC) and/or Shiga toxins (STEC) cause enteritis and (bloody) diarrhoea in young calves and in humans, and are also present in the intestines of healthy cattle. Besides the O157:H7 serotype, which is the main serotype causing STEC outbreaks in the world EPEC and STEC can belong to dozens of O serogroups. Of them, 9 have been frequently identified worldwide: O5, O26, O103, O104, O111, O118, O121, O145 and O165. The aim of this study is to identify the virulotypes and the O serotypes of EPEC and STEC isolated from healthy cattle at slaughterhouses in Wallonia. A total of 245 faeces (216 <1year-old bulls, 25 cows and 4 heifers) were sampled between April and June 2014 in 2 slaughterhouses in Wallonia and grown overnight at 37°C in Lauryl sulfate Enterobacteriaceae selective broth. The enrichment broths were assayed with an stx1, stx2 (Shiga toxin) and eae (AE lesion) triplex PCR and positive broths were inoculated onto 4 agar media: McConkey’s, Chromagar ES, Chromagar ES with tellurite and Chromagar STEC. Up to ten colonies per plate were picked up, sub-cultured and tested by the colony hybridization assay with gene probes targeting the stx1, stx2 and eae genes. The triplex PCR was again performed on all probe-positive isolates. The PCR-positive E. coli were subsequently assayed with two pentaplex PCR targeting the specific genes coding for the ten O serogroups listed above. Of the 2563 sub-cultured isolates, 744 isolates (29%) from 62 animals (25%) tested positive with the colony hybridization assay. Of them, 687 isolates (92%) from 59 animals were positive with the triplex PCR and the results of both tests were in agreement for 617 isolates (83%). One to 29 isolates per animal were probe- and PCR-positive. The positive isolates grew on Chromagar STEC (379; 55%), on Chromagar ES with tellurite (189; 28%), on Chromagar ES (62; 9%) or on McConkey’s agar (57; 8%). The most frequent virulotypes were eae+ (EPEC: 372 isolates; 54%), eae+stx1+ (AE_STEC: 119 isolates; 17%) and stx2+ (STEC: 118 isolates; 17%). In some animals different virulotypes were identified. The serogrouping with the two pentaplex PCR is in progress. AE-STEC, EPEC and STEC are excreted by 25% of the healthy cattle at slaughterhouses in Wallonia and different virulotypes can be excreted by the same animal. Conversely the methodology followed gives no precise idea of the actual level of excretion since the hybridization and PCR were performed after enrichment in selective broth. Therefore multiple isolates belonging to the same virulotype might represent the same clone. Identification of the serogroups and comparison by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis should help to clarify that point. Quantitative (q)PCR is today the best method to quantify bacterial excretion, but is more expensive. The results of the hybridization and PCR correspond to between 80 and 90%. Though the colony hybridization is still useful for large-scale surveillance it needs radioactive probes for highest sensitivity and is more time-consuming than PCR. Therefore the PCR should be the first routine choice if it can be automatized at large scale. Further steps are the confirmation of the PCR results of the 70 isolates with different hybridization and PCR results and the identification of the serogroups with the two pentaplex PCR and later with PCR for the other serogroups, to compare them with isolates from young diarrhoeic calves and from humans. [less ▲]

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See detailSIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF RECEPTOR DYNAMICS IN A BMP REGULATORY NETWORK
Germain, Morgan ULg; Bolander, Johanna; Ji, Wei et al

Poster (2016, September)

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See detailAn innovative non-animal chitosan hydrogel is able to restore the rheology of osteoarthritis synovial fluid ex vivo
Henrotin, Yves ULg; Rocasalbas, Guillem; Chausson, Mickaël et al

Poster (2016, September)

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See detailApproche stratégique de formation du personnel local au sein des ONG internationales dans un contexte incertain : cas du Burundi
Hakizumukama, Alexis ULg

in Actes des Rencontres Internationales sur la Diversité (2016, September)

The human resources management issues is a major challenge for the current and future international organizations, especially those of the non merchant sector, as the environmental context in which they ... [more ▼]

The human resources management issues is a major challenge for the current and future international organizations, especially those of the non merchant sector, as the environmental context in which they operate is changing more and more quickly. Thus, beyond the mobilization and the gradual professionalization of volunteers to adapt their contribution to the missions of NGOs, these organizations are also experiencing a real need for personnel able to adapt without too much difficulty, the complexity of the local context whose evolution often proves unpredictable. But this labor, multiple and high skills, is often scarce on the local labor market. This finding essentially explains the presence of expatriates who work daily alongside local employees who may be employees and volunteers, and whose management requires a sufficiently coherent strategy with organizational goals and interests of these stakeholders. HRM strategy implementation within the subsidiaries shall submit their leaders to multiple challenges brought by a set of actors focused on different and even divergent interests. The model and HRM practices in any organization, reflect the dominant HRM strategy. During our research, we pay special attention to the evolution of HRM models (Pichault and Nizet, 2013) and strategy implemented in the training of local personnel by subsidiaries studied by relying on the theory of social regulation (Reynaud, 1997, 1999). The conclusions of our work indicate that the development of HRM strategy following a joint regulatory process appears best suited to international NGOs working in uncertain environment. [less ▲]

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See detailProperties of single fasteners - Ring shank nails
Mergny, Elke ULg; Sandhaas, Carmen

Conference (2016, September)

In Eurocode 5, nailed joints are designed using the Johansen model extended with the rope effect. The necessary input parameters are embedment strength fh, yield moment My and withdrawal capacity Fax. We ... [more ▼]

In Eurocode 5, nailed joints are designed using the Johansen model extended with the rope effect. The necessary input parameters are embedment strength fh, yield moment My and withdrawal capacity Fax. We can obtain these parameters by using empirical equations based on regression analysis. These equations are given by EC5, for smoothed nails. However, especially for ring shank nails, no consistent rules are given in the current version of Eurocode 5 and the values must be taken from technical documents of the single nails. The aim of this STSM was firstly to develop a database. It was based on 96 reports, mostly about ring shank nails tests, carried out for certification purposes, from 33 producers. Based on this extensive database, regression analyses have been carried out, especially the wire tension strength 𝑓𝑢, the yield moment 𝑀𝑦 and nail tension capacity 𝐹𝑡, all are direct nail proprieties. Potential benefits are more robust design models covering a large range of nails, reduced testing and simplified design equations. [less ▲]

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See detailConclusion
Veymiers, Richard ULg

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailCancer du canal anal: identification de deux sous-types distincts
Herfs, Michael ULg

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailA new method for identifying experimental and Palaeolithic hafting adhesives using GC×GC-HRTOFMS
Cnuts, Dries ULg; Perrault, Katelynn ULg; Dubois, Lena ULg et al

Poster (2016, September)

Hafting adhesives can be seen as an indication of the cognitive and technical capabilities of the manufacturers and therefore play a key role in the debate on human evolution [1], [2]. These adhesives are ... [more ▼]

Hafting adhesives can be seen as an indication of the cognitive and technical capabilities of the manufacturers and therefore play a key role in the debate on human evolution [1], [2]. These adhesives are mainly from plant origin (resins, gums or tar) and are often mixed with beeswax and other additives in order to make them less brittle. Archaeological evidence indicates that these adhesives were already in use in the Paleolithic from at least 120.000 years ago [3]. Discoveries for this period are however very rare and only become abundant from the Neolithic onwards [4]. Their longer exposure to biochemical alteration processes limits the chance of survival in the archaeological record. If they are present on Paleolithic stone tools, they appear often in such small quantities that they are challenging to identify by traditional gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or even to remove them effectively from the stone tool. The destructive nature of traditional GC-MS analysis can damage these rare samples for other analyses. Our study aims to overcome this problem by using headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) for sample extraction and analysis by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography –high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-HRTOFMS), which has the benefit of analyzing the volatile organic compound (VOC)s from the substance and it does not destroy the complete matrix of the adhesive. We present the results of a pilot study intended to examine the potential of this technique for analyzing Palaeolithic adhesives. The study involved (1) an examination of experimental compound adhesives (containing pine and spruce resin, acacia gum and birch tar; beeswax and additives like charcoal, flax or ochre), (2) a blind test on experimental samples to test the reliability of the method and to determine the minimal quantity necessary for analysis, and (3) the analysis of different Palaeolithic adhesives and of experimental samples of at least 15 years old. The analysis was done on extracted and non-extracted adhesives. A unique chromatographic fingerprint was obtained for all experimental adhesive samples. The VOC profile of these adhesives proved to be extremely complex and therefore benefitted significantly from multidimensional separation techniques. GC×GC-HRTOFMS provided an optimal chromatographic separation of adhesive components. HRTOFMS data was used in order to obtain high-resolution mass spectral data to contribute to compound identification. Our study demonstrates that GC×GC-HRTOFMS is a well suited method for identifying small quantities of compound adhesives with significant potential for Palaeolithic contexts. The additional sensitivity afforded by this technique in comparison to traditional GC-MS is a substantial benefit for these quantities. Furthermore, by only analyzing the VOCs of the adhesives, these rare archeological samples are not destroyed and can still be used for other types of analysis. [1] L. Wadley, ‘Compound-Adhesive Manufacture as a Behavioral Proxy for Complex Cognition in the Middle Stone Age’, Curr. Anthropol., vol. 51, no. s1, pp. S111–S119, Jun. 2010. [2] L. Barham, From Hand to Handle: The First Industrial Revolution. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. [3] P. P. A. Mazza, F. Martini, B. Sala, M. Magi, M. P. Colombini, G. Giachi, F. Landucci, C. Lemorini, F. Modugno, and E. Ribechini, ‘A new Palaeolithic discovery: tar-hafted stone tools in a European Mid-Pleistocene bone-bearing bed’, J. Archaeol. Sci., vol. 33, no. 9, pp. 1310–1318, Sep. 2006. [4] M. Regert, ‘Investigating the history of prehistoric glues by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.’, J. Sep. Sci., vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 244–54, Feb. 2004. [less ▲]

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See detailVITRICELL: new efficient method for cryopreserving cells by vitrification
Connan, Delphine ULg; Ectors, Fabien ULg; Antoine, Nadine ULg et al

Conference (2016, September)

Using stem and related cells for clinical purposes requires efficient and bio-safe handling. Cryopreservation is a mandatory key step of storage and transportation, during which cells undergo extreme ... [more ▼]

Using stem and related cells for clinical purposes requires efficient and bio-safe handling. Cryopreservation is a mandatory key step of storage and transportation, during which cells undergo extreme physical and chemical conditions prone to alter their viability as well as their biological properties. Conventional slow-freezing often results in poor survival rates mainly due to excessive cell dehydration and water crystallization. We have addressed this problem by developing a new cryopreservation method based on aseptic and automatable vitrification in sealed french straws. Furthermore, only bio-safe and chemically defined cryopreservation media are used. We have demonstrated that, despite additional constraints, our aseptic vitrification process is more efficient (recovery rates, morphology, pluripotency…) than conventional slow freezing for cryopreserving human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). These results have been confirmed on various sensitive stem cell-like lines and embryos from human and non-human species. VITRICELL will soon provide researchers and clinicians with its vitrification kits, allowing to upgrade the current yields and safety after cryopreservation of their high-value cells. [less ▲]

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See detail10 years of advances in nonlinear system identification in structural dynamics: A review
Noël, Jean-Philippe ULg; Kerschen, Gaëtan ULg

in Proceedings of ISMA 2016 - International Conference on Noise and Vibration Engineering (2016, September)

Nonlinear system identification is a vast research field, today attracting a great deal of attention in the structural dynamics community. Ten years ago, an MSSP paper reviewing the progress achieved ... [more ▼]

Nonlinear system identification is a vast research field, today attracting a great deal of attention in the structural dynamics community. Ten years ago, an MSSP paper reviewing the progress achieved until then concluded that the identification of simple continuous structures with localised nonlinearities was within reach. The past decade witnessed a shift in emphasis, accommodating the growing industrial need for a first generation of tools capable of addressing complex nonlinearities in larger-scale structures. The objective of the present paper is to survey the key developments which arose in the field since 2006 towards developing these tools. [less ▲]

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See detailTeaching of Life Cycle Assessment methodology to sensitize future engineers to sustainable development
Belboom, Sandra ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg

in Proceedings of the 8th Conference on ‘Engineering Education for Sustainable Development’ (2016, September)

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See detailComparing conventional excellence: moral and technical features of "good research"
Charlier, Nathan ULg

Conference (2016, September)

During a stay at Lancaster University, I was struck to discover how the institutional branding relied on the rhetoric of excellence. Several flags scattered over the campus are displaying statements such ... [more ▼]

During a stay at Lancaster University, I was struck to discover how the institutional branding relied on the rhetoric of excellence. Several flags scattered over the campus are displaying statements such as: "our physicists helped discover the Higgs boson particle", "Lancaster University is ranked among the top 10 universities in the UK", "our volcanologists made the first observation of a rare type of lava", etc. These quotes convey technologies such as rankings, but also moral and epistemological aspects regarding the role and status of scientific knowledge. This fostered my reflection regarding the fieldwork I made in different research institutions located in Belgium: while academic excellence is not at the core of their branding per se, it is indeed a key issue for many actors concerned with research governance. My paper proposes to map the different ways to frame the notion of excellence in four institutions: two large biotech research centres and two universities in Flanders and Wallonia. It relies on 25 semi-structured interviews with tenured academics involved in their institution's research management. The paper will compare how "good research" is valued in different settings: what counts when one evaluates the "excellence" of a scientific production/career? To which technologies, indicators and to which "moral principles" are interviewees referring to when they discuss excellence? How do they engage in criticizing certain framings and praise others? Eligible for the rhetoric or comparative panel, my contribution will present four distinct institutional conventions that govern research practices and sorts the good scientist from the bad. [less ▲]

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See detailSetting up ex-vivo biomechanics studies
Balligand, Marc ULg

in Proceedings of the 18th ESVOT congress (2016, September)

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See detailChemical profiling of major components in natural waxes to elucidate their roles in liquid oil structuring
Diem Doan, Chi; Ming To, Chak; Lynen, Frederik et al

Poster (2016, September)

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See detailGay adoptive families: between stressors and losses. 2 contrasted cases
Messina, Roberta ULg; D'Amore, Salvatore ULg

Conference (2016, September)

Gay adoptive families are more and more present in the European context (currently the full joint adoption by same sex couples is granted in 9 European countries and 4 countries permit the step-child ... [more ▼]

Gay adoptive families are more and more present in the European context (currently the full joint adoption by same sex couples is granted in 9 European countries and 4 countries permit the step-child adoption). Despite the numerous studies on lesbian and gay parent- headed families, the current literature that has focused specifically on gay adoptive parent families remains rather limited. This research has the aim of increase the scientific knowledge on this new family form with the purpose to shed light on typical stressors experienced by parents and by children. The specificity of these families consists, among others, to be at the crossroads of two levels of complexity: being adoptive families and being LG families. Like all LG families, gay adoptive families have to face different stressors such as the lack of support by families of origin and social context, the need to hide their parenting project, the fear to not be considered parents "like the others" and the worry that their children are discriminated because of parents’ homosexuality. In addition to these stressors linked to the family structure, there is the challenge to adopt a child already marked by difficult life experiences and abandonment. The specificity of these families is the product of the difficulties encountered from the couples to became parents and of the experience of loss experienced by the child. The result of this whole meeting, is often found in parents’ strategies to face stressors and in the weight that the loss takes on for the child and in the relational dynamics of the family. Through two contrasting cases we will reflect on the possible adaptive strategies of parents and on the importance of integrating the child history in a new family story in which past, present and future come together and don’t know fractures. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of bovine methicillin resistant staphylococci from Europe, Africa and North America by colony hybridization, PCR and antibiotic sensitivity.
Ngassam Tchamba, Cyrille ULg; Thiry, Damien ULg; Bardiau, Marjorie et al

Conference (2016, September)

Mastitis is the costliest pathology in dairy cattle and staphylococci are the most prevalent bacterial mastitis pathogens worldwide. Antimicrobial treatment of mastitis has led to the selection of ... [more ▼]

Mastitis is the costliest pathology in dairy cattle and staphylococci are the most prevalent bacterial mastitis pathogens worldwide. Antimicrobial treatment of mastitis has led to the selection of resistant staphylococci, of which the Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are the most studied ones. Still, MR has also been described for non-aureus staphylococci (MRS) species. Bovine MRS(A) represent not only a problem in the treatment of mastitis, but also a potential hazard in public health via the inter-Staphylococcus transferability of the mobile “Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome” (SCC) carrying the mec genes encoding MR and the zoonotic potential of some Staphylococcus species. The aim of this study is the comparison of genetic and phenotypic methods for the identification of MRS(A) isolated from bovine mastitis in European, African and North-American countries. A total of 1168 mastitis-associated staphylococci were isolated between 2005 and 2014 in Belgium, Italy, Switzerland, Senegal, Niger and Canada, and kept at -80°C until further use. Out of them, 867 isolates were identified to S. aureus while 301 isolates were non aureus staphylococci. All 1168 staphylococci were tested genetically by the dot blot hybridization assay on positively charged nylon membranes (Roche) after DNA extraction with 32P-radioactively labelled probes derived from the mecA and mecC genes and phenotypically by growth on “Chrom MRSA ID®” agar plates. Isolates positive at both or either tests were further studied by PCR targeting the same two genes and by the disk diffusion assay to oxacillin and cefoxitin. A total of 265 isolates (23%) were positive at both or either tests. Out of them, 27 S. aureus (10%) but no non-aureus (0%) tested positive both for DNA hybridization with the mecA probe and for growth on “Chrom MRSA ID®” plates. No isolate tested positive with the mecC probe. In addition, 32 S. aureus (12%) and 15 non aureus (6%) were positive with the mecA probe only and 169 S. aureus (64%) and 22 non aureus (8%) grew on “Chrom MRSA ID®” plates only. The S. aureus originate from Belgium (105), Italy (6), Canada (31), Senegal (38) and Niger (48) whereas the non-aureus originate from Belgium (25), Italy (1) and Niger (11). All of them are being tested with the PCR targeting the mecA gene and by the disk diffusion assay to oxacillin and cefoxitin. Most isolates (72%) grew on “Chrom MRSA ID®” plates only while few (18%) were positive to the hybridization with the mecA probe only. This high difference between the results of both tests could be explained by the weak specificity of phenotypic tests comparing to genetic tests. The others 10% of the isolates (S. aureus) which are positive with the two methods (dot blot hybridization and “Chrom MRSA ID®”) can be considered as MRSA mediated by the mecA gene. However, results of PCR and disk diffusion assay will confirm respectively the presence of mec genes and which of the two methods is the most suitable for identifying MRS from mastitis cases in cattle. Comparison of the results of phenotypic and genetic assays will indicate whether other variant(s) than mecA and mecC may be present in MRS. Further genetic and phenotypic studies are needed to (i) identify the non-aureus isolates to the species level; (ii) compare the MRS(A) isolated in the different countries by their biotypes, serotypes, lysotypes, and virulotypes, without forgetting their SCCmec and their clonal complex; and (iii) identify the mec gene variant present in hybridization-positive PCR-negative isolates, if any. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of the Jovian aurorae
Bonfond, Bertrand ULg

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailCpG-DNA expand immunosuppressive interstitial macrophages from Ly6c+ local precursors
Sabatel, Catherine ULg; Radermecker, Coraline ULg; Fievez, Laurence ULg et al

in Proceeding of Cell Symposia: 100 years of phagocytes (2016, September)

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See detailHome blood pressure in kidney transplant recipients (Ktr) - Validity of different schedules of self-monitoring
SAINT-REMY, Annie ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Journal of Hypertension (2016, September), 34(e supplement 2), 119

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See detailSystematic Downstream Development, Optimization and Equipment Design for Biobased Products and Processes
Bednarz, Andreas; Rüngeler, Bettina; Scherübel, Peter et al

in Chemie Ingenieur Technik (2016, September), 88(9), 1375-1376

Biobased synthesis poses specific challenges due to the properties of raw materials, intermediates, and products. They are induced by the higher oxygen content as compared to fossil feedstock. Thus low ... [more ▼]

Biobased synthesis poses specific challenges due to the properties of raw materials, intermediates, and products. They are induced by the higher oxygen content as compared to fossil feedstock. Thus low vapor pressure, higher viscosity, low concentration in aqueous solution will require new, preferably liquid-based downstream processes, for which many different options can be proposed. A systematic method to evaluate such a multitude of options based on cascaded option trees is presented, which combines representation and evaluation of options on a suitably chosen level of detail. Criteria, which have to be fulfilled by the options, are flexibly evaluated ranging from input of experts to detailed simulation. Clear visualization also allows transparent communication of results to members of interdisciplinary teams and project partners. The method is demonstrated for extractive separation steps including real-world problems encountered. This includes high viscosities, presence of solids or microorganisms leading to crud formation, and optimization of process conditions solving the conflicting challenges balancing e.g. between low toxicity to microorganisms and process efficiency. [less ▲]

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See detailCrystallization and morphologies of waxes in rice bran oil
Diem Doan, Chi; Patel, Ashok R.; Danthine, Sabine ULg et al

Conference (2016, September)

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See detailFrom resource to process efficiency. Educating a new generation of georesources engineers
Pirard, Eric ULg; Fiorentino, Rosalia ULg

in Mazijn, Bernard (Ed.) Proceedings 8th Conference on Engineering Education for Sustainable Development (2016, September)

Even though the Circular Economy paradigm clearly puts the emphasis on recycling, it is essential to understand that we will still need for decades to explore and find resources in the earth crust. Mining ... [more ▼]

Even though the Circular Economy paradigm clearly puts the emphasis on recycling, it is essential to understand that we will still need for decades to explore and find resources in the earth crust. Mining is vital to feed the loop and make sure enough metals and minerals are made available to society. But, mining is also one of the most challenging industrial operations when it comes to sustainability objectives. A modern education in mineral resources engineering must build on a strong technical background but give students the opportunity to confront their knowledge with societal needs and responsibilities. The EMerald Erasmus Mundus Master program in Georesources Engineering was set up by four leading European universities with the clear objective to educate responsible professionals who will be actors of sustainable solutions. Therefore, the University of Lorraine, the Lulea Technical University, the TU Bergakademie Freiberg and the University of Liege (coordinator) designed a unique curriculum bridging the traditional gap between natural sciences and engineering, encompassing the valley too often separating the industrial operators from the stakeholders of a mining project. The program offers a unique blend of courses from geology to mineral processing with the aim to familiarize students with the most advanced tools for improving the efficiency of processes. Field trips and industrial visits are a key component of this program as are the non-technical seminars delivered by professionals (lawyers, entrepreneurs, NGO leaders, etc.). Evaluation is often based on written reports, documentary research and short oral presentations to make sure students acquire the indispensable soft skills for efficient communication on environmental and societal issues linked to the impact of extractive activities. Internships and hands-on practices on pilot platforms or laboratory equipments are absolutely essential to reach the highest standards and meet the objectives of the master program. This is costly and can only be maintained thanks to the strong presence of the participating universities in research programs. All four universities are core partners of the EIT Raw Materials knowledge innovation community. This gives an additional leveraging effect when it comes to the education of young entrepreneurs with a strong sustainability mindset. [less ▲]

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See detailAge-related changes in the modulation of attentional brain responses to sleep pressure at night
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Reichert, Carolin; Maire, Micheline et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2016, September)

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See detailUniversité d'été du Cifen 2015 : insertion professionnelle et parcours enseignants. Mise en perspective et présentation du programme de la journée
Simons, Germain ULg

in Didactiques en Pratique (2016, September), 2

Cette communication ouvrait l'Université d'été 2015 du Cifen. La thématique du colloque : "insertion professionnelle et parcours enseignants" y fut brièvement présentée, de même que les questions qui ... [more ▼]

Cette communication ouvrait l'Université d'été 2015 du Cifen. La thématique du colloque : "insertion professionnelle et parcours enseignants" y fut brièvement présentée, de même que les questions qui allaient baliser cette journée d'études. Ensuite le programme de la journée fut rappelé aux participants. [less ▲]

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See detailExperimental Assessment of The Influence of Interface Geometries on Structural Response
Dossogne, Tilàn ULg; Jerome, Trevor; Lancereau, Damien et al

Poster (2016, September)

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See detailCompte rendu de l’atelier « Entretiens de stages »
Francois, Nathalie ULg; Simons, Germain ULg; Van Hoof, Florence ULg

in Didactiques en Pratique (2016, September), 2

Cet article présente le compte rendu d'un atelier portant sur les entretiens de stages dans l'enseignement. Lors de l'atelier, les participants étaient invités à analyser des extraits d'entretiens entre ... [more ▼]

Cet article présente le compte rendu d'un atelier portant sur les entretiens de stages dans l'enseignement. Lors de l'atelier, les participants étaient invités à analyser des extraits d'entretiens entre un futur enseignant, son maitre de stage et son formateur. La discussion collective a permis ensuite de mettre en exergue des éléments potentiellement porteurs et facilitateurs dans ces situations d'entretiens. [less ▲]

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See detailGait pattern of healthy old people for fast walking condition
GILLAIN, Sophie ULg; Boutaayamou, Mohamed ULg; Schwartz, Cédric ULg et al

in Gerontechnology (2016, September)

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See detailSurfactant-assisted USP deposition of WO3 electrochromic thin films on various TCO-glass substrates
Maho, Anthony ULg; Nicolay, Sylvain; Manceriu, Laura ULg et al

Conference (2016, August 31)

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See detailLandscape diversity, better for biodiversity? - hoverflies and butterflies in different agri-environment schemes
Pécheur, Emilie ULg; Piqueray, Julien; Dopagne, Claude ULg et al

Conference (2016, August 31)

In Europe, agri-environment schemes (AES) are designed to give credit to environmental issues in agricultural practices. Among the different Walloon AES, some are dedicated to enhance and preserve ... [more ▼]

In Europe, agri-environment schemes (AES) are designed to give credit to environmental issues in agricultural practices. Among the different Walloon AES, some are dedicated to enhance and preserve biodiversity linked to the agroecosystems. This study wishes to explore, at a landscape scale, how do different AES perform regarding butterflies and syrphidae diversity. Data collection occurred in five categories of ecological infrastructures (EI): four types of agri-environmental schemes (grassy strips, wildflower strips, bird-feeding margins, species-rich meadows) and cereal crops. Five replicates were selected for each category. Syrphidae were collected in water traps once per month, from May to July. Butterflies were monitored along transects from May to Augustus. Plant species were identified in every plot, within a 1-m radius around the traps and along a transect through every plot. Preliminary results show that abundance and species diversity of butterflies is significantly higher in parcels with floral resources. Moreover, hosts plants for larvae and foraging plants for adults are significantly more present in two types of AES: the wildflower strips and the species-rich meadows. Regarding the identified plant species, categories are divided in three groups (crops apart): bird-feeding margins; species-rich meadows and grassy strips; wildflower strips (Fig.1). Concerning hoverflies, a significantly higher abundance is observed in the wildflower strips compared to the crops in June (p= 0.008). Other abundance values in May and July show no difference. These results suggest that wildflower strips are performing infrastructures for biodiversity conservation in agroecosystems. As the presence of floral resources seem to be an important factor for the presence of foraging of adults, attention should be paid to the provisioning of food resources for the larval stages, especially butterflies, at a landscape scale in order to assure a sustainable approach in biodiversity support. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation in allowing cave exploitation: ecological and evolutionary insights from the fire salamander
Manenti, Raoul; Melotto, Andrea; Tagliaferro, L. et al

Conference (2016, August 31)

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See detailA Macro-Element Formulation and Solution Procedure for Shear Analysis of RC Deep Beams
Liu, Jian ULg; Mihaylov, Boyan ULg

in the 11th fib International PhD Symposium in Civil Engineering (2016, August 30)

This paper presents a computationally-effective macro element capable of predicting the complete shear response of RC deep beams in analogy with beam elements for slender beams. The element stems from a ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a computationally-effective macro element capable of predicting the complete shear response of RC deep beams in analogy with beam elements for slender beams. The element stems from a three-parameter kinematic theory (3PKT) for the shear strength and deformation capacity of deep beams subjected to double curvature. The macro element is composed of two rotational springs and one transverse spring to simulate the nonlinear flexural and shear behaviour of the shear span. The element has two nodes (end sections) with two DOFs per node, which enables it to be easily connected to other elements of the same or different types to model structures with deep beams. The numerical implementation of the element is based on the secant stiffness approach which provides robust convergence properties. Validation studies are performed by using thirteen tests from the literature showing excellent results for the complete shear response. The obtained peak load experimental-to-predicted ratios have an average of 1.10 with a coefficient of variation of 14.2%, while these values for the mid-span deflection are 1.16 and 17.0%. [less ▲]

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See detailSuperconductors used as trapped field magnets : investigation of hybrid structures combining superconducting and ferromagnetic materials
Vanderbemden, Philippe ULg; Fagnard, Jean-François ULg; Caps, Hervé ULg et al

Conference (2016, August 30)

In addition to their unique ability to carry electric currents without loss, superconductors are able to trap significant magnetic flux densities at low temperature. In so-called type-II irreversible ... [more ▼]

In addition to their unique ability to carry electric currents without loss, superconductors are able to trap significant magnetic flux densities at low temperature. In so-called type-II irreversible superconductors, these properties are due to the pinning of individual flux lines (vortices) by defects at the nanoscale level. In this talk the influence of pinning on the magnetic properties of bulk superconductors will be explained and illustrated, with the emphasis placed on how pinning can be exploited to produce “trapped field magnets” for practical applications. We will then show how the properties of these trapped field magnets are enhanced when superconductors (SC) are combined to soft ferromagnetic (FM) alloys [1,2]. In particular we investigate the properties of macroscopic FM/SC/FM structures where the superconductor is sandwiched between two ferromagnetic sections, one of each circular face. In particular we show how the properties of the whole structure is influenced by the saturation magnetization and the geometry of the ferromagnetic material. References: 1. M P Philippe, J-F Fagnard, S Kirsch, Z Xu, A R Dennis, Y H Shi, D A Cardwell, B Vanderheyden, and P Vanderbemden, Magnetic characterisation of large grain, bulk Y–Ba–Cu–O superconductor–soft ferromagnetic alloy hybrid structures. Physica C: 502 (2014) 20-30. 2. M P Philippe, M D Ainslie, L Wera, J-F Fagnard, A R Dennis, Y H Shi, D A Cardwell, B Vanderheyden, and P Vanderbemden, Influence of soft ferromagnetic sections on the magnetic flux density profile of a large grain, bulk Y–Ba–Cu–O superconductor. Superconductor Science and Technology: 28 (2015) 095008. [less ▲]

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See detailStrychnine poisoning still happens in 2015
DEVILLE, Marine ULg; Lemaire, Eric ULg; DENOOZ, Raphael ULg et al

Conference (2016, August 29)

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See detailA hidden Markov model to estimate inbreeding from whole genome sequence data
Druet, Tom ULg; Gautier, Mathieu

Conference (2016, August 29)

Inbreeding results from the mating of related individuals and has negative consequence because it brings together deleterious variants in one individual. Inbreeding is associated with recessive diseases ... [more ▼]

Inbreeding results from the mating of related individuals and has negative consequence because it brings together deleterious variants in one individual. Inbreeding is associated with recessive diseases and reduced production or fitness. Until recently inbreeding was estimated with genealogical data, which have some limitations. Genomic estimates of inbreeding can now be obtained thanks to new technologies. Methods based on genomic relationships assume either that identical-by-state markers are identical-by-descent (IBD) or correct for the allele frequencies estimated in a « founder generation ». Similarly, with runs of homozygosity (ROH), the hypothesis is that stretches of homozygous markers longer than a determined threshold (measured in number of markers or in Mb) are IBD. Although sequencing data are more informative, most of the recent studies used genotyping data. Due to high genotyping errors rates with sequencing technologies, ROH are difficult to use on such data. We herein describe an original method to model inbreeding along chromosomes. It relies on a hidden Markov model that determines locally whether a segment is inbred and gives a measure of inbreeding's age. The method uses a function modeling the probability to observe a genotype in an inbred segments. It is well suited for sequencing data because the function incorporates genotyping errors and uncertainty associated with low or moderate coverage. We first determine the properties of our new method with different simulation scenarii. Then, we use it to estimate inbreeding in the Belgian Blue Beef cattle population with either genotyping arrays (of various densities) or whole genome sequencing data. The estimates will be compared to those obtained with other methods (pedigree, ROH, genomic relationship). Latest results will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailHow reliable are the models to study recent climate change ? A study of heat/cold waves and radiative fluxes trends over 1900-2010 using the model MAR in Belgium
Wyard, Coraline ULg; Fettweis, Xavier ULg; Scholzen, Chloé ULg

Poster (2016, August 29)

This research aims to assess the ability of the regional climate model MAR ("Modèle Atmosphérique Régional") to reconstruct the observed twentieth century climatology of extreme events and solar radiation ... [more ▼]

This research aims to assess the ability of the regional climate model MAR ("Modèle Atmosphérique Régional") to reconstruct the observed twentieth century climatology of extreme events and solar radiation in Belgium, as a necessary condition for reliable future projections. Simulations were performed by forcing MAR with several reanalyses: the ERA40/ERA-Interim, the ERA-20C and the NCEP/NCAR-v1. The results suggests that increasing air temperature would have generated decreasing relative humidity which would have lead to a decrease in cloudiness and an increase in solar downward radiation. This research illustrates the dependency between RCMs and their forcings. The forcing reanalyses can generate divergent trends while contrary to Global Climate Models (GCM), the reanalyses assimilate observations and are supposed to represent the same climate. [less ▲]

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See detailSeasonal variation in human brain function
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

Conference (2016, August 25)

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See detailNormative data on teachers’ voice use in real-life situations
Schiller, Isabel ULg; Morsomme, Dominique ULg; Alcoulombre, Anaëlle et al

Conference (2016, August 25)

Background As part of their working routine, teachers use their voice for extended periods of time. To compensate for adverse acoustic conditions and background noise, they are also required to speak at ... [more ▼]

Background As part of their working routine, teachers use their voice for extended periods of time. To compensate for adverse acoustic conditions and background noise, they are also required to speak at high intensities. Since teaching is acknowledged to be vocally demanding, several studies have investigated teachers’ vocal load, that is, the stress inflicted on the larynx during vocalization, which is thought to be influenced by duration, intensity and frequency of phonation. A promising method for analyzing teachers’ phonatory behavior in real-life situations is the use of a portable voice dosimeter that objectively documents vocal parameters. Depending on several factors, those parameters may vary within the teaching profession (Masuda et al., 1993; Morrow and Connor, 2011; Remacle, Morsomme, and Finck, 2014). With the aim of quantifying their vocal parameters and identifying the most at-risk teaching conditions, we have established a large database of French-speaking teachers. Based on this database, this study analyzed vocal loading differences with regard to gender, teaching level, and environment (professional versus extra-professional). Methods Seventy-six French-speaking teachers (15 males and 61 females) were monitored during one workweek using the Ambulatory Phonation Monitor voice dosimeter (KayPENTAX). The subjects included 21 kindergarten, 20 primary and 35 secondary school teachers. All male subjects were in the latter group. The vocal parameters analyzed were phonation time, intensity and fundamental frequency (F0). Results The statistical analysis revealed that, irrespective of gender, phonation time, F0 and intensity level were significantly higher in the professional environment than the extra-professional environment (p<.01). Among female subjects, the F0 of kindergarten teachers was significantly higher than that of primary school teachers, which in turn was higher than that of secondary school teachers (p<.01). The phonation time and intensity were also higher in female kindergarten teachers than other female teachers, but this difference did not reach significance. As expected, regarding gender differences, we found that female secondary school teachers spoke with significantly higher F0 than their male colleagues (p<.001). In the extra-professional setting, they also spoke with a significantly higher intensity (p<.05), but no such effect was found in the professional environment. Conclusion Overall, our subjects showed an increase in vocal loading parameters when they were at work compared to their free time. This confirms the results of earlier studies and demonstrates that teaching is an occupation with remarkably high vocal demands. The analysis of mean frequency showed that lower school levels were associated with higher-pitched voice. It can be assumed that kindergarten teachers adapt to the higher F0 of their young pupils and that their effort to maintain the pupils’ attention results in greater frequency variations. References Masuda, T., Ikeda, Y., Manako, H., & Komiyama, S. (1993). Analysis of vocal abuse: Fluctuations in phonation time and intensity in 4 groups of speakers. Acta Oto-Laryngologica, 113(3), 547–552. Morrow, S. L., & Connor, N. P. (2011). Comparison of voice-use profiles between elementary classroom and music teachers. Journal of Voice, 25(3), 367–372. Remacle, A., Morsomme, D., & Finck, C. (2014). Comparison of vocal loading parameters in kindergarten and elementary school teachers. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 57(2), 406–415. [less ▲]

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See detailHow do we understand Smart City? An Evolutionary Perspective
Crutzen, Nathalie ULg; Kummitha, Rama

Conference (2016, August 25)

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See detailSocial Comparison and Gender Differences in Professional Expectations
Dupont, Virginie ULg

Conference (2016, August 24)

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See detailThe influence of background noise on vocal loading parameters in music theory teachers
Schiller, Isabel ULg; Morsomme, Dominique ULg; Sfez, Lou et al

Poster (2016, August 23)

Background: Music theory teachers, who teach rhythm, singing and other music-related skills and topics, depend greatly on a well-functioning voice. Unlike other schoolteachers, who primarily use their ... [more ▼]

Background: Music theory teachers, who teach rhythm, singing and other music-related skills and topics, depend greatly on a well-functioning voice. Unlike other schoolteachers, who primarily use their voice as a pedagogic tool, music theory teachers also use it as an instrument. Furthermore, they often engage in vocally demanding free-time activities requiring a singing voice. To date, few studies have specifically looked at the voice use of music theory teachers. This study aims (1) to measure the background noise level and the amount of vocal loading affecting this specific population, and (2) to describe the influence of background noise on vocal loading parameters. Methods: Thirteen French-speaking music theory teachers (9 females and 4 males) working in a music school were monitored for one workweek, using the VoxLog voice dosimeter (Sonvox). To investigate the professional and extra-professional environments, all subjects wore the dosimeter from early morning until the end of the day. The parameters analysed were background noise level, duration of phonation, sound pressure level (SPL) and fundamental frequency (F0) of voice. Results: Overall, the mean background noise level was 75.2 dB (SD=5.4). We measured higher background noise level at work (mean=78.2 dB, SD=5.8) than in the extra-professional environment (mean=72.2 dB, SD=5.2). As expected, a rise in background noise was accompanied by a significant rise in voice SPL in both males and females (r=.61, p<.001). A significant correlation between background noise and F0 was found in females (r=.41, p=.002), but not in males (r=.39, p=.055). Furthermore, our data exhibit a significant correlation between background noise and duration of phonation (r=.05, p<.001). Conclusion: Our data suggest, that in class, music theory teachers must cope with background noise levels that dramatically exceed the limit of 35 dB recommended by the WHO (Inserm, 2006). High background noise levels lead to an increase in voice SPL, a phenomenon known as the Lombard effect (Inserm, 2006). In female subjects, we also observed a rise in F0 further to high background noise. Like Ternström, Södersten, and Bohman’s (2002) study, our data indicate that high background noise levels increase the duration of phonation. In a noisy environment, subjects seem to prolong the voiced segments of speech to make themselves understood. In other words, high background noise levels result in higher vocal loading. In the long run, this may increase the risk of voice disorders such as hyperfunctional dysphonia or vocal fold pathologies consecutive to repeated microtrauma in music theory teachers. [less ▲]

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See detailOccurrence rates of invasive plants in limestone quarries (Southern Belgium)
Pitz, Carline ULg; Jorion, Alexis ULg; Mahy, Grégory ULg et al

Conference (2016, August 23)

In quarries, invasive plant species can slow down the installation of high conservation value vegetation. Successful management of invasive requires, at first, a quantitative assessment of invasion levels ... [more ▼]

In quarries, invasive plant species can slow down the installation of high conservation value vegetation. Successful management of invasive requires, at first, a quantitative assessment of invasion levels. Although European legislation has adopted an ambitious strategy against invasive species, there is still a lack of knowledge about their occurrence in quarries. The aim of this study was to evaluate occurrence rates of invasive plant species in limestone quarries throughout Wallonia (Southern Belgium) and identify high priority and emerging invasive plants for adapted management. During 2016 vegetation period, forty quarries were selected by stratified sampling, using abandoned and active quarries as strata. Within selected quarries, two-meter wide transects were established to cross all activity sectors. Transects were divided in 10x2m plots, resulting in 2% of total surface of each quarry being surveyed. Cover and number of individuals of invasive plants species were recorded in each plot. Species considered were those of Harmonia list (67 species), the reference at the Wallonia scale. More than 30 000 plots were surveyed. Results of our recent study are presented (occurrences rates by species, mean percentage cover per site). First results indicate that dominant invasive species originate from different introduction paths: (i) planted (Robinia pseudoacacia); (ii) ornamentals (Cotoneaster horizontalis) and (iii) spontaneous colonization (Senecio inaequidens) - and follow various invasion dynamics. We propose research and management methods to be directed towards limitation of top ten frequent species (e.g. Buddleia davidii, Senecio inaequidens), and to establish a detection system for the emerging invasive plants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (16 ULg)