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See detailBacillus amyloliquefaciens GA1 as a source of potent antibiotics and other secondary metabolites for biocontrol of plant pathogens.
Arguelles-Arias, A.; Ongena, MARC ULg; Halimi, B. et al

in Microbial Cell Factories (2009), 8(1), 63

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Phytopathogenic fungi affecting crop and post-harvested vegetables are a major threat to food production and food storage. To face these drawbacks, producers have become increasingly ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Phytopathogenic fungi affecting crop and post-harvested vegetables are a major threat to food production and food storage. To face these drawbacks, producers have become increasingly dependent on agrochemicals. However, intensive use of these compounds has led to the emergence of pathogen resistance and severe negative environmental impacts. There are also a number of plant diseases for which chemical solutions are ineffective or non-existent as well as an increasing demand by consumers for pesticide-free food. Thus, biological control through the use of natural antagonistic microorganisms has emerged as a promising alternative to chemical pesticides for more rational and safe crop management. RESULTS: The genome of the plant-associated B. amyloliquefaciens GA1 was sample sequenced. Several gene clusters involved in the synthesis of biocontrol agents were detected. Four gene clusters were shown to direct the synthesis of the cyclic lipopeptides surfactin, iturin A and fengycin as well as the iron-siderophore bacillibactin. Beside these non-ribosomaly synthetised peptides, three additional gene clusters directing the synthesis of the antibacterial polyketides macrolactin, bacillaene and difficidin were identified. Mass spectrometry analysis of culture supernatants led to the identification of these secondary metabolites, hence demonstrating that the corresponding biosynthetic gene clusters are functional in strain GA1. In addition, genes encoding enzymes involved in synthesis and export of the dipeptide antibiotic bacilysin were highlighted. However, only its chlorinated derivative, chlorotetaine, could be detected in culture supernatants. On the contrary, genes involved in ribosome-dependent synthesis of bacteriocin and other antibiotic peptides were not detected as compared to the reference strain B. amyloliquefaciens FZB42. CONCLUSION: The production of all of these antibiotic compounds highlights B. amyloliquefaciens GA1 as a good candidate for the development of biocontrol agents. [less ▲]

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See detailBacillus anthracis
Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Linden, Annick ULg; Mainil, Jacques ULg

Learning material (2002)

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See detailThe Bacillus licheniformis BlaP beta-lactamase as a model protein scaffold to study the insertion of protein fragments.
Vandevenne, Marylène ULg; Filée, Patrice ULg; Scarafone, Natacha ULg et al

in Protein Science : A Publication of the Protein Society (2007), 16(10), 2260-71

Using genetic engineering technologies, the chitin-binding domain (ChBD) of the human macrophage chitotriosidase has been inserted into the host protein BlaP, a class A beta-lactamase produced by Bacillus ... [more ▼]

Using genetic engineering technologies, the chitin-binding domain (ChBD) of the human macrophage chitotriosidase has been inserted into the host protein BlaP, a class A beta-lactamase produced by Bacillus licheniformis. The product of this construction behaved as a soluble chimeric protein that conserves both the capacity to bind chitin and to hydrolyze beta-lactam moiety. Here we describe the biochemical and biophysical properties of this protein (BlaPChBD). This work contributes to a better understanding of the reciprocal structural and functional effects of the insertion on the host protein scaffold and the heterologous structured protein fragments. The use of BlaP as a protein carrier represents an efficient approach to the functional study of heterologous protein fragments. [less ▲]

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See detailBacillus lipopeptides as MAMPs for non-pathogenic bacteria perception and defense responses elicitation in plant cells.
Henry, Guillaume; Ongena, MARC ULg; Jourdan, Emmanuel ULg et al

in Bulletin OILB/SROP = IOBC/WPRS Bulletin (2009), 43

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See detailBacillus lipopeptides: versatile weapons for plant disease biocontrol.
Ongena, MARC ULg; Jacques, Philippe

in Trends in Microbiology (2008), 16(3), 115-25

In the context of biocontrol of plant diseases, the three families of Bacillus lipopeptides - surfactins, iturins and fengycins were at first mostly studied for their antagonistic activity for a wide ... [more ▼]

In the context of biocontrol of plant diseases, the three families of Bacillus lipopeptides - surfactins, iturins and fengycins were at first mostly studied for their antagonistic activity for a wide range of potential phytopathogens, including bacteria, fungi and oomycetes. Recent investigations have shed light on the fact that these lipopeptides can also influence the ecological fitness of the producing strain in terms of root colonization (and thereby persistence in the rhizosphere) and also have a key role in the beneficial interaction of Bacillus species with plants by stimulating host defence mechanisms. The different structural traits and physico-chemical properties of these effective surface- and membrane-active amphiphilic biomolecules explain their involvement in most of the mechanisms developed by bacteria for the biocontrol of different plant pathogens. [less ▲]

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See detailBacillus subtilis as a biopesticide : biochemical and technological aspects
Thonart, Philippe ULg; Heuze, V.; Destain, Jacqueline ULg et al

in Progress in biotechnology (1994), 9

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See detailBacillus subtilis as a tool for screening soil metagenomic libraries for antimicrobial activities
Biver, Sophie ULg; Steels, Sébastien ULg; Portetelle, Daniel ULg et al

in Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology (2013), 23(6), 850-855

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See detailBacillus subtilis M4 decreases plant susceptibility towards fungal pathogens by increasing host resistance associated with differential gene expression
Ongena, MARC ULg; Duby, Franceline ULg; Jourdan, E. et al

in Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology (2005), 67(5), 692-698

Results presented in this paper describe the ability of Bacillus subtilis strain M4 to reduce disease incidence caused by Colletotrichum lagenarium and Pythium aphanidermatum on cucumber and tomato ... [more ▼]

Results presented in this paper describe the ability of Bacillus subtilis strain M4 to reduce disease incidence caused by Colletotrichum lagenarium and Pythium aphanidermatum on cucumber and tomato, respectively. Disease protection in both pathosystems was most probably due to induction of resistance in the host plant since experiments were designed in order to avoid any direct contact between the biocontrol agent and the pathogen. Pre-inoculation with strain M4 thus sensitised both plants to react more efficiently to subsequent pathogen infection. In cucumber, the use of endospores provided a disease control level similar to that obtained with vegetative cells. In contrast, a mixture of lipopeptides from the surfactin, iturin and fengycin families showed no resistance-inducing potential. Interestingly, treatment with strain M4 was also associated with significant changes in gene transcription in the host plant as revealed by cDNA-AFLP analyses. Several AFLP fragments corresponded to genes not expressed in control plants and specifically induced by the Bacillus treatment. In support to the macroscopic protective effect, this differential accumulation of mRNA also illustrates the plant reaction following perception of strain M4, and constitutes one of the very first examples of defence-associated modifications at the transcriptional level elicited by a non-pathogenic bacterium in a host plant. [less ▲]

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See detailBacillus subtilis sequencing report
Jacquemin, Sophie; Portetelle, Daniel ULg; Vandenbol, Micheline ULg

Poster (1997)

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See detailBacillus subtilis spore production in bioreactor : influence of culture method.
Meurisse, E.; Moukon, A.; Anong, J. B. et al

Poster (1994, July)

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See detailBacillus subtilis: biocontrol and growth promotion
Ongena, Marc ULg

Conference (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (1 ULg)
See detailBacillus-based biocontrol of Fusarium disease on tomato cultures in Burundi
Nihorimbere, Venant; Ongena, Marc ULg; Cawoy, Hélène ULg et al

Poster (2009, May 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (4 ULg)
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See detailBacillus-based biological control of plant diseases
Cawoy, Hélène ULg; Bettiol, Wagner; Fickers, Patrick et al

in Stoytcheva, Margarita (Ed.) Pesticides in the Modern World - Pesticides Use and Management (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 143 (20 ULg)